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12

The only time you really need to turn your wheels when parked is when parking on a hill. Uphill you should point your wheels away from the curb. When pointing downhill you should point your wheels towards the curb. This is so if the parking mechanism should fail, the curb will hopefully stop the momentum of the vehicle and keep it from rolling very far. ...


10

The vehicle in question is a front-wheel drive. FWDs are sensitive to front wheel alignment, since the front suspension and wheel linkages work under different conditions when accelerating and not accelerating: on acceleration, the wheels push backwards on the road, thus tend to move the front suspension forwards relative to the vehicle. on de-acceleration,...


8

Note: this answer only addresses drive-by-wire; I don't know if you could tell whether the other systems employ by-wire technologies as readily. Drive-By-Wire : Look at your throttle body If it has a throttle plate actuated by cable, you have drive-by-cable, not drive-by-wire Drive-by-cable examples: Drive-by-wire examples: Notice the absence of a ...


7

Check the power steering belt. If the belt is slipping, it would probably squeal horribly, but it might not if it's really loose. It could also have broken, in which case there would be no sound. If the belt isn't turning the power steering pump, then you won't have any power steering.


7

tl;dr: Steering feedback means different things to different people. Ultimately, however, it's about using the steering wheel as both an input and an output device. At a very high level, the concept of steering feedback has to do with the user interface of the car. If we restrict the discussion to just the wheel in front of you, it's easy to imagine that ...


7

What you are describing is called bump steer. This is caused by a toe change when the suspension travels vertically. Common Causes include Incorrect tie rod height or lenght steering rack that is not mounted parallel to the datum plane. bent steering parts structural damage to the vehicle I'd start by checking the mounting of the steering rack since ...


7

First of all, that is the job of the shop where you did the alignment, not just the wheels they should also check if the steering is aligned with the position of the wheel (they are entitled to do so). Solution: You can definitely take it to the station back and show them the problem; there is a good chance that the engineer might have forgotten to do ...


7

Drive by wire systems have no mechanical connection between the input decive (like a throttle/gas pedal) and the output device (like the engine). They use only electrical signals. To my knowledge there aren't any cars that use this system for steering. Your steering wheel is mechanically connected to the front wheels but is assisted by an electric motor. ...


6

I would not back the nut off to align the nut with the cotter pinhole. Doing so can result in the taper between the knuckle and the tierod becoming loose. The cotter pin would keep the nut from backing off but it would not prevent the tapered shaft of the tierod from spinning in the tapered hole of the knuckle. As @MikeSaull has suggested lube the threads. ...


6

Found it was because a bolt holding the steering rack in place had sheared. Very dangerous and glad I decided to visit a mechanic!


6

You seem to be describing the weight of the steering, which varies from vehicle to vehicle. It isn't something to be concerned about. Many factors influence the lightness (or heaviness) of steering feel, including: steering/chassis geometry amount of hydraulic (power-steering) assist tire size I would be concerned if you cannot or struggle to turn ...


6

When you say OBD i'm assuming you mean generic data. The answer is outright NO. OBD generic data has no parameters that the alignment can be gleamed from. If the car has a steering wheel angle sensor then maybe you could tell if something is wrong. This data would be available in manufacturer specific. If the angle has been off for a long time at high ...


6

The force required for the driver to turn the steering wheel would be a torque measured in foot-pounds (or Newton-meters). Extra Credit: The actual force required for the rack in a rack and pinion style steering system to push/pull the tie-rods to turn the wheels would be a simple load measured in pounds or kilograms. The actual load the tires experience ...


5

The boot kit alone isn't going to be enough to overhaul the joint - you might need parts of the actual CV joint if the boots have been open to the elements long enough for dirt to get in there and turn the grease into grinding paste. If you're at that stage, buy an overhauled axle shaft.


5

Is the noise coming from the steering itself, or from the tyres? i.e does it make the noise as you are turning the steering wheel, or does it still do it as you hold the wheel steady during the turn? If it is the latter (the "hollywood tyre squeal" effect), that is quite common, particularly on the smooth concrete you tend to find in multi-story car parks. ...


5

This is called "cramping" the steering and it is bad for the pump and for the steering rack. What you are doing is forcing the system to try and push the steering components further than what they are meant to go. This causes over pressure on the pump (you may hear a slight squeal sound of the belt as the pump momentarily stalls), and it creates a bind in ...


5

I pulled the tires off and inspected the front end suspension and steering, and found that the sway bar linkage on the drivers side was detached.


5

tl;dr: Winter tires are different and you are sensitive enough to tell. It doesn't sound like you have a problem. It seems that you are detecting exactly what I detect when I put my winter tires on after the summer. Quoting from the Tire Rack article: New winter tires begin with deeper tread depths and more open tread designs than the tires used ...


5

I would venture to guess that it is a completely random, and in no way threatening plastic trim piece/wiring harness/adjustment lever under the steering column that is rubbing or vibrating against it's fasteners or another trim piece. It is completely intermittent because sometimes it catches itself in such a way that it doesn't vibrate, or it could be ...


4

maybe you should try to lubricate the rack and pinion and the base on which the steering system is mounted


4

When the steering wheel is at the end of its travel (completely left/right) it is normal that the power steering pump starts making some extra noise At max travel, the steering pump will produce its maximum pressure and will have to work the hardest. This will create a "hissing" type noise. When the fluid level is low, then you will hear the pump moaning ...


4

Tires are out of balance, or possible a bent rim. Take it back to where the tires were put on and tell them you have a vibration. If you have a vibration when you are using the brakes that goes away when you take your foot off the brake you may have warped rotors. I would take car of the tire balance issue first before addressing the rotors. You may only ...


4

It's possible the belts inside one of the tires is broken. With brand new tires, likely a manufacturing defect. A broken belt will make the car feel as you describe, and can be mistaken for the tires being out of balance. I've had this happen before. In my case, the tire was old and I hit too many potholes. One of the unique symptoms I remember is the ...


4

The movement of the steering as you hit a bump is called bump steer, but this has nothing to do with what the beginning of your question is about. As you turn the wheel (you turning it, not bump steer), the geometry of the steering components are such that the inner tire (which ever it may be) will turn tighter than the outer wheel. It is this way because ...


4

It sounds to me like the previous owner suspected an outer CV joint (which was my first thought when you described the problem) and changing it didn't fix the issue. I would double check that the outer CV joints look new and there is a good chance the problem could relate to one of the inner CV joints. Diagnosing the problem will likely be a case of ...


4

You need to identify the source of the leak Clean everything in your driveway. Use Gunk, water soluble, or the like and get the Power Steering Fluid gone. Then: Allow everything to dry out. Validate any leaks...mind you, you have not started the engine since you cleaned EVERYTHING that could be consider oil out of the engine bay. Now, start it and run. ...


4

If you have worn out steering parts, these can cause your issue, worn parts cause slack in the steering, when you brake it will pull to the side which has the most slack at the time. You can test for steering slack by starting the car, leave it park, set the brake and roll down the drivers window, get out and reach inside the window and rock the steering ...


4

After some reading, it appears Jeantaud's mechanism uses shorter lever arms to acheive a more accurate effect. However, both mechanisms (Ackerman and Jeantaud) are sensitive to a number of things, wheelbase, speed, and body roll from suspension travel - namely toe changes (and to a lesser extent camber changes). Mechanically these mechanisms are quite the ...


3

I would use some anti-seize on the threads then tighten it to torque spec. If it doesn't line up then I would tighten it until it does. This is just what I would do. If it is a weak bolt or a really bad place for the threads to strip then I would just loosen it until it lines up. Once the cotter pin is in it shouldn't go anywhere anyways.


3

Depending on the age of the car you may be experiencing "steering rack morning sickness". If it gets better as the car warms up you most likely have a steering rack that is on its' way out. This is a common first symptom of rack failure. Generally it occurs after the car has sat for an extended period like overnight. It will get gradually take longer and ...



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