Hot answers tagged

37

You stated you had dirt in your wheels from the incident. Two things could be happening to you: You still have dirt in one or more of your wheels causing an imbalance. A simple scrub will take care of the issue. You threw one or more of your wheel weights. These are the things which keep the wheel/tire from vibrating. You'd need to take it to a tire shop ...


19

Even though you state that no curb was hit, it could be that you still hit something small while sliding and that could have affected the alignment of the wheels. Or if there really was no obstacle hit, simply switching from the road to dirt at an angle could have been a shock to the wheels. Happened to me once to hydroplane at ~30km/h and hit a side curve ...


8

Sliding sideways into the dirt on the shoulder could cause a bent rim. I would have suspected you would be more likely to feel that at about 45mph but if the bend is relatively light, this could be the cause. Taking the car in for re-balancing would likely find the problem quickly.


6

You seem to be describing the weight of the steering, which varies from vehicle to vehicle. It isn't something to be concerned about. Many factors influence the lightness (or heaviness) of steering feel, including: steering/chassis geometry amount of hydraulic (power-steering) assist tire size I would be concerned if you cannot or struggle to turn ...


5

tl;dr: Winter tires are different and you are sensitive enough to tell. It doesn't sound like you have a problem. It seems that you are detecting exactly what I detect when I put my winter tires on after the summer. Quoting from the Tire Rack article: New winter tires begin with deeper tread depths and more open tread designs than the tires used ...


5

First of all, that is the job of the shop where you did the alignment, not just the wheels they should also check if the steering is aligned with the position of the wheel (they are entitled to do so). Solution: You can definitely take it to the station back and show them the problem; there is a good chance that the engineer might have forgotten to do ...


4

As per the comment from @Ben, it's called the "steering wheel tilt/telescope adjustment lever". Not trying to steal anyone's thunder, just getting this question off the 'unanswered question' list c:


3

If it is occurring at only a certain speed range it is most likely a wheel out of balance but could also be belt separation. If you take your vehicle to the location you got the tires many will do balancing for free. If the belts have separated they will know in the spin balance and tell you you need a new tire.


3

Unbalance tires maybe one of the reason. You may want to go to the shop and have its alignment checked. If they are new, you may have a free check up where you purchased them which i have done before.


3

It's difficult to determine the root cause of a death wobble from the behaviour alone, but there are some clues. They're just not fool proof. If you find your death wobble is related to speed, and stops when you lower your speed (instead of having to come to a full stop), then it's probably an issue with tire balance or possibly wheel bearings. If you find ...


2

Most probably, you need an alignment. The part of alignment which causes your wheel to return to center is called caster (the other two major portions of alignment are toe-in and camber). Here is a representation of the caster alignment: This website gives a pretty good explanation of caster and how it affects driving in your car: When you turn the ...


2

Looking at the reset procedure for the SAS (Steering Angle Sensor) on Ross Tech VCDS wiki here it would appear that within this software measuring blocks 08 groups 007 is returning real-time steering angle data in degrees. Where this data is located other than that I'm afraid I don't know. The part number for the SAS on VAG cars appears to be 1J0-959-654-J ...


2

Steering wheel vibration is caused by many things like brakes, suspension, but i think in your case its certainly your tires. Now 2 things could be happening. A) tires were deformed by the dirt while your car was stopping or B) tires become unbalanced. Quoting Wikipedia on Tire Balance: When the wheel rotates, asymmetries of mass may cause it to hop ...


1

I had a situation where I intended to turn right but the snow packed road caused my care to continue straight ahead until the tire 'caught' a dry patch, thus causing the car to jerk to the right. No apparent troubles, but I did hear a 'click' when the tire hit the dry patch. I was able to complete the turn and proceed along my merry way. In the succeeding ...


1

Possible underlying problem, i.e, wheel bearings, tie rod ends, sloppy rack and pinion. Best to let your mechanic do an inspection for you. Don't agree with dirt or mud if it wasn't vibration before then. Possible weights which was said. At 60mph keep that speed while putting your car into either a higher gear (if available) or a lower gear, keep at 60 mph, ...


1

Found it. The part number for the 2012 is 35880-TR0-A01. The part isn't listed on the official Honda Parts site but you can find it on HondaPartsNow. It's called Switch Assy., Audio Remote. http://www.hondapartsnow.com/genuine/honda~switch~assy~audio~remote~35880-TR0-A01.html


1

Looking at the picture you have in the first link, the shaft (#27 in the picture) where the coupler (#40) attaches has a notch in it. Since the shaft is not splined, the notch would serve two purposes: 1) to ensure the steering shaft (red arrow) stays on the notched shaft (#27); 2) to ensure the shaft (red arrow) doesn't turn on the notched shaft (#27). ...


1

The phrase "where the rubber meets the road" sums everything up. Tires affect how the car feels and handles. If you don't like how your car feels and handles then get a different set of tires. There is no way to fix the problem (assuming nothing is wrong with the car).


1

Edmunds is showing it as a constant ratio (14.7:1). Steering type as: Electric-assist, speed-proportional, rack-and-pinion power steering Variable ratio steering is not that common. If it had it, I'm sure it would appear all over the place.


1

I believe you really have three options I can think of: Put your Google-Fu to use and scour the internet. I used the phrase cars with telescoping steering wheels in my search and came up with two lists which might be helpful: Top 10 Vehicles for Shorter Drivers Top 10 Vehicles for Taller Drivers While you may think that is cray-cray or something, ...


1

I had this problem at 60 plus miles an hour it shook really bad and looking back it was a minor shake at lesser speeds but was tolerable. I had one tire that was an older directional tire and changed it out for the spare that matched the other tires. Problem solved. The car feels perfect. Make sure it is not the tires or wheels first.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible