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5

First of all, that is the job of the shop where you did the alignment, not just the wheels they should also check if the steering is aligned with the position of the wheel (they are entitled to do so). Solution: You can definitely take it to the station back and show them the problem; there is a good chance that the engineer might have forgotten to do ...


4

If there is room behind the seat now (ie: you could slide the seat back further if it would let you), I'd pull the current seat out and remount it further to the rear. It sounds as though you'd only need about 2-3" more space to make it worth it. Most seats are bolted down using four mounting points, two on each seat rail. If these are bolts (or studs) which ...


4

It would certainly help. Just be careful of bucket seats. If you have a bigger than average backside, the bucket seat's lateral supports tend to dig into your thighs and will make for an infuriating long distance trip. Also, spend a bit more money and get good quality items. I had a set of NRX (made in China or something) seats which broke after two years. ...


3

This is called "cramping" the steering and it is bad for the pump and for the steering rack. What you are doing is forcing the system to try and push the steering components further than what they are meant to go. This causes over pressure on the pump (you may hear a slight squeal sound of the belt as the pump momentarily stalls), and it creates a bind in ...


2

Yes, it's technically possible. but in general it requires you or an electrician to make up custom wiring harnesses. In other words: you can't just install the head unit and expect it to work. That would be too simple. Real men have to suffer before they're allowed to enjoy something. The good news is that Parrot thought of this and offers the UNIKA ...


2

I do a fair bit of ICE (although mostly European and Japanese cars) and from my experience, unless one of the aftermarket providers has built an adapter you are usually out of luck. There are just too many different standards (or lack of them) for how steering wheel controls talk to head units. That said - replacements are often very cheap, or you can often ...


2

My subaru does this in winter if i turn the steering wheel before warming the car up. As above, it could be problem with your power steering pump, or fluid. It might also be your car is idling too low. Turn your wheel, and the pump kicks in, using the engine + pulley to power it. You're putting a load on the engine when all it wants to do is idle... ...


2

If I'm understanding your description here, I'd say your biggest issue is a safety issue with your steering column. You really need to get it together correctly so you will not have issues driving it. This is not only your safety you need to be worried about here, but the safety of your passengers and other motorists as well. To answer your questions, ...


1

Edmunds is showing it as a constant ratio (14.7:1). Steering type as: Electric-assist, speed-proportional, rack-and-pinion power steering Variable ratio steering is not that common. If it had it, I'm sure it would appear all over the place.


1

Looking at the reset procedure for the SAS (Steering Angle Sensor) on Ross Tech VCDS wiki here it would appear that within this software measuring blocks 08 groups 007 is returning real-time steering angle data in degrees. Where this data is located other than that I'm afraid I don't know. The part number for the SAS on VAG cars appears to be 1J0-959-654-J ...


1

The box marked in green is indeed the timing belt top cover. The belt you have marked with red arrows is the serpentine belt. The wheelie thing would be the serpentine belt tensioner. On your desription you have a problem with anything driven by the serpentine belt, and proberbly caused it to shred. Each item needs to be checked individually,


1

Your mechanic did not steer you wrong (pun intended). The area with the red arrows is actually your drive or serpentine belt, not your timing belt. What he replaced (besides the belt) was either an idler or tensioner pulley, which probably caused the belt's demise in the first place. The timing belt should be located under the cover which you have circled in ...


1

I took this back to O'Reilly and they took it back b/c it wasn't an "exact" fit for the part I was replacing, even though their computers said it was. They ordered me a pricier (by about 100%) part that actually had the correct configuration. I installed the pricier one, and it's been working fine since.



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