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12

Issues involving steering wheel vibrations problems usually are most noticeable at one or two narrow speed ranges (5-10mph and 60-70mph), and will decrease significantly, and in some cases, even disappear outside of these ranges. The amount of vibration caused by worn tires will often be seen over a broader speed range if the tire is worn more. The severity ...


6

Vibration felt in the steering wheel is usually caused by the front tires out of balance. That's the first place to look, other possibilities include: broken belt in the tire, out of round tire, a bent rim, a bent or out of round hub, wheel bearings. One of the things you can do to help narrow it down would be to rotate the tires, if the vibration in the ...


5

There are several things that can cause this - the simplest being the road itself! If you are on a cambered road, the car will want to pull towards the edge of the road... Presuming it's a stronger pull than that, your next suspect is the tracking (wheel alignment) - if this is out it will cause it to pull. Most decent tyre fitters will be able to check ...


5

I thought I'd mention this since others haven't. Are they aftermarket wheels? If so, do they have hub-centric rings and did you make sure all the hub-centric rings were on the wheels before installing them on the car? If you're missing a hub ring, it's possible the wheel isn't perfectly centered. The wobble is sometimes very slight and sometimes great, ...


5

First of all, that is the job of the shop where you did the alignment, not just the wheels they should also check if the steering is aligned with the position of the wheel (they are entitled to do so). Solution: You can definitely take it to the station back and show them the problem; there is a good chance that the engineer might have forgotten to do ...


4

You may be experiencing torque steer. Since you have Front Wheel Drive (FWD) your drive wheels and your steering wheels are the same. Sometimes under load if traction is uneven (such as in a corner your car is shifting its weight to one side and so will have more traction on the left or right tires) the power being sent to the wheels can become uneven, ...


4

It would certainly help. Just be careful of bucket seats. If you have a bigger than average backside, the bucket seat's lateral supports tend to dig into your thighs and will make for an infuriating long distance trip. Also, spend a bit more money and get good quality items. I had a set of NRX (made in China or something) seats which broke after two years. ...


4

If there is room behind the seat now (ie: you could slide the seat back further if it would let you), I'd pull the current seat out and remount it further to the rear. It sounds as though you'd only need about 2-3" more space to make it worth it. Most seats are bolted down using four mounting points, two on each seat rail. If these are bolts (or studs) which ...


3

Is it actually a full-out wobble, or just a really hard and fast shake? A wobble that throws your wheel left and right is a fairly big issue... Normally to do with the tightening of the lug-nuts. A rapid shake could be something as small as needing a balance on one or more wheels (weights can sometimes fall off, due to many factors... Dropping the tire too ...


3

if the shake becomes worse when you apply the brake, then I'd agree with the garage. The rotors are wearable items and as they get older, they often develop a warp (or to be more precise according to some schools of thoughts, uneven build up of brake pad material). How many miles are on those rotors? Also depends on your driving patterns, my rotors ...


3

This is called "cramping" the steering and it is bad for the pump and for the steering rack. What you are doing is forcing the system to try and push the steering components further than what they are meant to go. This causes over pressure on the pump (you may hear a slight squeal sound of the belt as the pump momentarily stalls), and it creates a bind in ...


2

Talking a look at the article some of the items you can check yourself, for example the ball joints. Other balancing and alignment actions require special equipment. I would suggesting taking that list and checking everything you are able to on your own first. Your Hayne's Manual should walk you through steps to check the suspension parts.


2

If it resembles a repetitive knocking or loud clicking noise, it's probably your CV joint.


2

I had a bad vibration when cruising on highway, I did an alignment and changed my wheels bearing. The vibration was mostly gone but I got a "death wobble", which is a loud noise coming from the front at high speed. I changed my tie rod ends and steering damper, redone an alignment and now everything is fine. I'll do what Larry suggest first, this are the ...


2

Noise from the strain of the power steering pump can cavitate (or 'reverberate' is probably more accurate) through lines and even to the steering wheel itself. Check fluid levels, and pump condition. If it all checks out it may just be normal. Typically bearings will not seize when they are already in motion. They can fail catastrophically, but it is ...


2

I believe it is fairly common place with aftermarket stereo systems. Look at this example from Crutchfield: I don't know much about them, other than that they exist. They do not in anyway modify your steering, just add a way to access controls at your fingertips.


2

The purpose of turning the wheel one turn is to put the wheels at a cant (other than straight). This is especially important on standard shift vehicles so it cannot just be put into neutral and moved. It just gives one more weapon in the arsenal against car thieves. The action of applying the club should be, before you turn the ignition off, turn the ...


2

Just FYI: a worn wheel bearing will make an irritating high-pitched whining noise. If you ignore that, it will start making a horrible grinding noise, accompanied by a slight vibration on the steering wheel. If you don't hear anything, it's probably not the bearing. What you can do: 1. Check for bald spots on the front wheels. 2. Have your shocks tested. Or ...


2

If I'm understanding your description here, I'd say your biggest issue is a safety issue with your steering column. You really need to get it together correctly so you will not have issues driving it. This is not only your safety you need to be worried about here, but the safety of your passengers and other motorists as well. To answer your questions, ...


2

My subaru does this in winter if i turn the steering wheel before warming the car up. As above, it could be problem with your power steering pump, or fluid. It might also be your car is idling too low. Turn your wheel, and the pump kicks in, using the engine + pulley to power it. You're putting a load on the engine when all it wants to do is idle... ...


2

I do a fair bit of ICE (although mostly European and Japanese cars) and from my experience, unless one of the aftermarket providers has built an adapter you are usually out of luck. There are just too many different standards (or lack of them) for how steering wheel controls talk to head units. That said - replacements are often very cheap, or you can often ...


2

Yes, it's technically possible. but in general it requires you or an electrician to make up custom wiring harnesses. In other words: you can't just install the head unit and expect it to work. That would be too simple. Real men have to suffer before they're allowed to enjoy something. The good news is that Parrot thought of this and offers the UNIKA ...


1

The box marked in green is indeed the timing belt top cover. The belt you have marked with red arrows is the serpentine belt. The wheelie thing would be the serpentine belt tensioner. On your desription you have a problem with anything driven by the serpentine belt, and proberbly caused it to shred. Each item needs to be checked individually,


1

Your mechanic did not steer you wrong (pun intended). The area with the red arrows is actually your drive or serpentine belt, not your timing belt. What he replaced (besides the belt) was either an idler or tensioner pulley, which probably caused the belt's demise in the first place. The timing belt should be located under the cover which you have circled in ...


1

Your vehicle should be checked over by a Mercedes mechanic. The front suspension and the rear suspension are both adjustable and can also be susceptable to damage, bushes, tie rods, ball joints, wheel rims, tyres. In many instances the correct service tools are required to carry out an effective repair or adjustment. There are several versions of the 2009 ...


1

It seems your multifunction switch is probably bad. It should be fairly easy to pull this switch to inspect it. I found these instructions to gain access: The turn signal canceling is part of the function of the 'multifunction switch'. This is a switch mounted on the steering column by 2 screws. Once you take the covers off, you can see the ...


1

When you say drivers side, do you mean front or rear? If front, then it could possibly be just bad luck. It's really hard to do sabotage a front caliper so I wouldn't say the shop didn't anything shoddy. If it's the rear, then how often do you use your parking brake? I know some places will use parking brake even though it is an automatic. It could be that ...


1

Recommendation Rather than second-guess the cause, I would recommend that you take it back to the tire shop and explain to them what you're experiencing. If you'd rather not... Clearly something is binding in the brakes and the most obvious thing to do is to remove the wheel and inspect for any kind of obstruction.


1

The idea of turning the wheel is to have the wheels turned to prevent movement of the car. After you park, turn the wheel prior to shutting off the car. I would suggest turning them towards the curb. If the ignition is removed by the thief the wheel will be unlocked. If the wheels were straight he would be able to drive the car albeit only in a straight ...


1

It sounds like your car already has a built-in steering wheel lock so The Club would have no benefit other than a visual deterrent and in that case it wouldn't matter how you put it on



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