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37

You stated you had dirt in your wheels from the incident. Two things could be happening to you: You still have dirt in one or more of your wheels causing an imbalance. A simple scrub will take care of the issue. You threw one or more of your wheel weights. These are the things which keep the wheel/tire from vibrating. You'd need to take it to a tire shop ...


19

Even though you state that no curb was hit, it could be that you still hit something small while sliding and that could have affected the alignment of the wheels. Or if there really was no obstacle hit, simply switching from the road to dirt at an angle could have been a shock to the wheels. Happened to me once to hydroplane at ~30km/h and hit a side curve ...


17

Issues involving steering wheel vibrations problems usually are most noticeable at one or two narrow speed ranges (5-10mph and 60-70mph), and will decrease significantly, and in some cases, even disappear outside of these ranges. The amount of vibration caused by worn tires will often be seen over a broader speed range if the tire is worn more. The severity ...


10

I thought I'd mention this since others haven't. Are they aftermarket wheels? If so, do they have hub-centric rings and did you make sure all the hub-centric rings were on the wheels before installing them on the car? If you're missing a hub ring, it's possible the wheel isn't perfectly centered. The wobble is sometimes very slight and sometimes great, ...


8

Sliding sideways into the dirt on the shoulder could cause a bent rim. I would have suspected you would be more likely to feel that at about 45mph but if the bend is relatively light, this could be the cause. Taking the car in for re-balancing would likely find the problem quickly.


7

First of all, that is the job of the shop where you did the alignment, not just the wheels they should also check if the steering is aligned with the position of the wheel (they are entitled to do so). Solution: You can definitely take it to the station back and show them the problem; there is a good chance that the engineer might have forgotten to do ...


6

Vibration felt in the steering wheel is usually caused by the front tires out of balance. That's the first place to look, other possibilities include: broken belt in the tire, out of round tire, a bent rim, a bent or out of round hub, wheel bearings. One of the things you can do to help narrow it down would be to rotate the tires, if the vibration in the ...


6

You seem to be describing the weight of the steering, which varies from vehicle to vehicle. It isn't something to be concerned about. Many factors influence the lightness (or heaviness) of steering feel, including: steering/chassis geometry amount of hydraulic (power-steering) assist tire size I would be concerned if you cannot or struggle to turn ...


5

Is it actually a full-out wobble, or just a really hard and fast shake? A wobble that throws your wheel left and right is a fairly big issue... Normally to do with the tightening of the lug-nuts. A rapid shake could be something as small as needing a balance on one or more wheels (weights can sometimes fall off, due to many factors... Dropping the tire too ...


5

There are several things that can cause this - the simplest being the road itself! If you are on a cambered road, the car will want to pull towards the edge of the road... Presuming it's a stronger pull than that, your next suspect is the tracking (wheel alignment) - if this is out it will cause it to pull. Most decent tyre fitters will be able to check ...


5

This is called "cramping" the steering and it is bad for the pump and for the steering rack. What you are doing is forcing the system to try and push the steering components further than what they are meant to go. This causes over pressure on the pump (you may hear a slight squeal sound of the belt as the pump momentarily stalls), and it creates a bind in ...


5

tl;dr: Winter tires are different and you are sensitive enough to tell. It doesn't sound like you have a problem. It seems that you are detecting exactly what I detect when I put my winter tires on after the summer. Quoting from the Tire Rack article: New winter tires begin with deeper tread depths and more open tread designs than the tires used ...


4

You may be experiencing torque steer. Since you have Front Wheel Drive (FWD) your drive wheels and your steering wheels are the same. Sometimes under load if traction is uneven (such as in a corner your car is shifting its weight to one side and so will have more traction on the left or right tires) the power being sent to the wheels can become uneven, ...


4

It would certainly help. Just be careful of bucket seats. If you have a bigger than average backside, the bucket seat's lateral supports tend to dig into your thighs and will make for an infuriating long distance trip. Also, spend a bit more money and get good quality items. I had a set of NRX (made in China or something) seats which broke after two years. ...


4

If there is room behind the seat now (ie: you could slide the seat back further if it would let you), I'd pull the current seat out and remount it further to the rear. It sounds as though you'd only need about 2-3" more space to make it worth it. Most seats are bolted down using four mounting points, two on each seat rail. If these are bolts (or studs) which ...


4

As per the comment from @Ben, it's called the "steering wheel tilt/telescope adjustment lever". Not trying to steal anyone's thunder, just getting this question off the 'unanswered question' list c:


3

The specific thing to watch out for is the splines on the steering column. The way most aftermarket wheels I have seen work is that the wheel has 6-12 small socket-head bolts in the centre that attach it to a mounting boss, which is splined to fit onto the column. The wheel manufacturers then generally sell different bosses to suit different makes of car - I ...


3

Talking a look at the article some of the items you can check yourself, for example the ball joints. Other balancing and alignment actions require special equipment. I would suggesting taking that list and checking everything you are able to on your own first. Your Hayne's Manual should walk you through steps to check the suspension parts.


3

if the shake becomes worse when you apply the brake, then I'd agree with the garage. The rotors are wearable items and as they get older, they often develop a warp (or to be more precise according to some schools of thoughts, uneven build up of brake pad material). How many miles are on those rotors? Also depends on your driving patterns, my rotors ...


3

It's difficult to determine the root cause of a death wobble from the behaviour alone, but there are some clues. They're just not fool proof. If you find your death wobble is related to speed, and stops when you lower your speed (instead of having to come to a full stop), then it's probably an issue with tire balance or possibly wheel bearings. If you find ...


3

Unbalance tires maybe one of the reason. You may want to go to the shop and have its alignment checked. If they are new, you may have a free check up where you purchased them which i have done before.


3

If it is occurring at only a certain speed range it is most likely a wheel out of balance but could also be belt separation. If you take your vehicle to the location you got the tires many will do balancing for free. If the belts have separated they will know in the spin balance and tell you you need a new tire.


2

I had a bad vibration when cruising on highway, I did an alignment and changed my wheels bearing. The vibration was mostly gone but I got a "death wobble", which is a loud noise coming from the front at high speed. I changed my tie rod ends and steering damper, redone an alignment and now everything is fine. I'll do what Larry suggest first, this are the ...


2

I would start with balancing them, especially since you feel it the most in the steering wheel, and make sure to balance them dynamically not just statically.. also make sure your tires dont have uneven wear like 'lumps'


2

Noise from the strain of the power steering pump can cavitate (or 'reverberate' is probably more accurate) through lines and even to the steering wheel itself. Check fluid levels, and pump condition. If it all checks out it may just be normal. Typically bearings will not seize when they are already in motion. They can fail catastrophically, but it is ...


2

I believe it is fairly common place with aftermarket stereo systems. Look at this example from Crutchfield: I don't know much about them, other than that they exist. They do not in anyway modify your steering, just add a way to access controls at your fingertips.


2

The purpose of turning the wheel one turn is to put the wheels at a cant (other than straight). This is especially important on standard shift vehicles so it cannot just be put into neutral and moved. It just gives one more weapon in the arsenal against car thieves. The action of applying the club should be, before you turn the ignition off, turn the ...


2

Just FYI: a worn wheel bearing will make an irritating high-pitched whining noise. If you ignore that, it will start making a horrible grinding noise, accompanied by a slight vibration on the steering wheel. If you don't hear anything, it's probably not the bearing. What you can do: 1. Check for bald spots on the front wheels. 2. Have your shocks tested. Or ...


2

If it resembles a repetitive knocking or loud clicking noise, it's probably your CV joint.


2

It seems your multifunction switch is probably bad. It should be fairly easy to pull this switch to inspect it. I found these instructions to gain access: The turn signal canceling is part of the function of the 'multifunction switch'. This is a switch mounted on the steering column by 2 screws. Once you take the covers off, you can see the screws,...



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