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7

Since diesel engines rely on compression to run and not a spark like a gasoline engine, heat is directly involved in the combustion of the diesel in the combustion chamber. The way this occurs is that when the piston comes up it compresses the air which is in the cylinder. This creates heat. When the engine is cold, a lot of this heat gets transferred out of ...


5

This shall be a lesson to you about winterizing your bike. Let's take it from the top. Drain that nasty ancient gas out of the tank AND out of the carburetor bowl(s). You want it completely gone, all of it. If you're lucky, you'll be able to use "carburetor & fuel injector cleaner" (the fuel additive, NOT the spray) to clean any new varnish out of the ...


4

The other day while I was searching for information on electronic relays, I ran across this solution to your problem: (I found it on this site.) Here is the write up which goes along with it, which I find pretty cool: This is a clever little circuit involving two relays and a momentary switch and is more a of a 'logic' circuit than one used to switch ...


4

If you really want a no-install option, and even @paulster2 answer seems like work then why not use old school locks like gear/steering locks? Or better, this -


4

If your starter motor is working 8 times out of 10 then you probably need to replace it. It very likely has developed a dead spot on the armature. If the armature is positioned so that the brushes land on a dead spot, it won't start. Brushes are the electrical connection between the power source and the moving armature. The picture below shows how these ...


4

There are two things I'd look at as the problem. First and most likely is the solenoid on the starter is almost shot. The solenoid has a large copper washer which is pressed into the two posts (one from the battery connection and the other going to the starter motor). When this wears out, you'll get a clicking sound (almost a dead thud) as the Bendix is ...


3

The sound of the clicking is from the starter relay. There is a little bi-metal strip inside of the plastic housing and it's flapping back and forth. It's the same concept as a turn signal, it's just happening more rapidly. It means the voltage on your battery is low. Even though you just drove it, it might not be holding a charge well. Very hot ...


3

Background So there is a grounding switch on your clutch lever, hence the need to pull in the clutch to start the motorcycle. Troubleshooting You can disconnect that switch and get a piece of wire and complete the circuit at the connector. Once that's done, make sure you're in neutral and then try to start the bike. The switch is labeled 10 in the ...


3

You need to go back and look at the firing order of the spark plug wires you installed. If you get two out of place on a four cylinder engine, you now only have two good firing cylinders, and depending on which two got switched, one of them may even be firing the cylinder at opposition to the rest, not allowing the engine to get anywhere close to operating ...


3

Theory It sounds as if the starter solenoid is getting 'stuck' due to low voltage. That is the second buzzing noise. The high pitched sound is your fuel pump priming your system and is normal. Perhaps the rain created a grounding situation that drained your battery a bit. Regardless of that speculation, here is the fix. Charge the battery. I believe ...


2

I have experienced the same problem like yours today but it happened to be timing belt which was broken, after replacing the car was back to normal.


2

The problem probably resides in a connection somewhere in your starting system. I would start by disconnecting at the battery, making sure all connections are clean, then re-securing them so they are good and tight. Move your way back on the cables to ensure all other connections are good in the same manner. While you are moving down the cables, ensure there ...


2

"Maintenance Free" doesn't have anything to do with charging rate or charging frequency. "Maintenance Free" means that the manufacturer didn't provide any means of maintaining the water/acid level in the battery, which means that if a battery boils dry you can only replace it instead of refilling it yourself with water or acid, whichever is appropriate ...


2

This could be a problem with the neutral safety switch (NSS). Next time this happens, leave the switch to the on (or even accessory) position, then put your foot on the brake, then move the gear shift lever down to neutral and try again. You may even want to try shifting it several times down to first gear then back up into park or neutral. Even if you have ...


2

You have a poor, loose or corroded connection in the system. Ignition switch, starter cables, starter solonoid, starter motor, battery and earth cables all need to be checked. It is one of those jobs that you will solve at first examination of the system, say by a wiggle test, or time is needed to pain-stakingly check every point of the system.


2

You need to check the starter/solonoid for operation. The electrical system must be checked for correct voltages from battery to starter motor. A quick and dirty thing you can do, as it seems to work intermittantly, is to give the starter motor a couple of firm clouts with a hammer and then try starting. If the starter is on its way out, this will cause it ...


2

Your best bet is to get a replacement carb. Some have had good luck rebuilding them, but for the trouble of it, it's just a lot easier to buy a new one off the internet. Personally, I can never get them to run right after a rebuild. You can usually get one for less than $50 depending on the model. After you put a new one on, ensure you have a cut off valve ...


2

Remove and clean both of your battery cables and posts, put them back on nice and tight. If that doesn't fix the problem, start checking the main ground wires from the battery. You likely have a poor connection at one of those places.


2

There is a connection problem at your battery or in the cables. This usually happens at the battery post, whether a top or side post model. The cable is getting enough of a connection to run the lights and such, which is relatively low load. As soon as you touch the starter, which is a high load, you lose the connection and everything goes black. Please ...


2

I think the problem is, one or both of your battery leads are not connected properly. You need to do two things when you installed the new battery. Ensure the leads are completely clean of any type of debris or corrosion. Second, ensure they are tight enough to have a proper and secure connection. I believe the Concorde has side posts on the battery. These ...


2

When you have the key turned, is that rattling noise the same as when the car was working? You should hear the rumble of the engine firing. Try giving it some gas while turning the ignition. If the cylinders are firing, giving it gas should make it rumble louder and might help it start in cold weather. If you can only hear the high rattle or whizzing ...


2

While your question is pretty thorough, I'm assuming a few things in this answer that you didn't clarify; When you crank the engine, and it doesn't start, I'm assuming it's a smooth crank without hiccups. By that I mean it isn't trying to start, it just cranks. You have the petrol model, not a diesel. It uses an electronic push-button start mechanism. ...


2

1) Does that diagnosis sound correct? Seafoam sounds like a good way to go, but in this case it isn't going to cure the ill. The throttle body itself needs to be cleaned. I found this video which should show you pretty much how to clean it (as long as your engine is the same as the G35 in the video). Since the engine has reusable gaskets, as long as you ...


2

The problem is with the connection. You have either not tightened the strap enough, there is something there keeping the electricity from flowing (corrosion), or both. Take both straps off of the battery and ensure they are completely clean. You can do this by using a small brush and water to clean the crud off. Replace the straps on the battery (assuming ...


2

Eliminate the obvious first. Your van started with the old glow plugs (although with some effort), but it doesn't start at all with the new ones (without Easy Start--by the way, please don't use any kind of starting fluid on a diesel engine--it can cause serious damage). Can you put the old glow plugs back in and see if it goes back to the way it was? I ...


2

There are various factors which can cause the symptoms you are stating. If your car (1997) has a mechanical ignition system which is highly probable then check your ignition coil and if that is fine then check the spark plug.If your spark plugs work then clean them and check if the problem still exists.(BTW they should be brown in colour if they are dark ...


2

The part of starting a car that takes the most energy is overcoming the compression inside the cylinders. When the engine is running, the fuel/air mix in each cylinder is compressed by the firing stroke of another cylinder, but when starting, the starter motor has to do it all. If you think that the engine was turning over, but it was not starting, it is ...


1

You need to check the output from your alternator. With your volmeter connected across the battery, without the engine running, you should have a voltage of some thing like 12.2V (volts) to around 12.6V. depending on the state of charge of the battery. If you now start the vehicle, the battery connected as before, and you are getting 18V, then the Zener ...


1

The solenoid is probably on the starter itself. You can check if the signal is making it to the solenoid with a voltmeter while cranking the engine. You should see 12 volts. Other possibilities are the battery cable running to the starter, fuses, ignition switch itself, and the neutral safety switch. Try shifting it to neutral and starting, or wiggle the ...


1

I would check the fuel pump actually. It might be getting too hot, causing it to not put out the proper pressure. The only way to test this (that I'm aware of) is while it's running. You'd have to put a pressure gauge on it (at the rail) and check the fuel pressure while running. You'd then need to leave the gauge in place, somewhere you can see it while ...



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