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9

This sounds like a problem with the coolant temperature sensor. Don't worry - replacement is cheap and can be done easily by yourself or a friend who worked on cars before. Cause Cold engines need more fuel to start than warm engines. This is due to the fact that a part of the vaporized fuel condenses at the cold cylinder wall inside each cylinder. This ...


7

Repeated clicking is a result of not enough power making it to the starter. Your battery either has a bad connection, or is too weak to turn the starter motor. Battery Connection Your problem may be entirely due to a bad connection. Starters draw a lot of amps, and batteries are weaker in cold temperatures. I'd start by fully exposing the terminals. You ...


6

This could be caused by multiple things, the most likely case would be a bad battery in need of replacement. However before coming to that conclusion there are a few things which can be checked. Make sure your battery terminals are in good working order and are not grounding out any where make sure they are insulated and not cracked and touching metal. ...


6

I recommend you carry out the following steps: Have the starter relay tested. From the description provided (old starter was clicking) this may actually be fine but it is so easy to verify that it works it would be silly to not rule this out as the source of the problem. After locating the starter relay, have someone turn the key in the ignition to start ...


5

Ice Probably the most common problem that people have is when their car is parked in a moist environment below degrees, resulting in ice forming on some or all of the windows. To resolve this problem, see this answer. Battery Another problem that is quite common (this happened to me recently), is if you have a car with a car battery that is in poor ...


4

Based on my limited knowledge on scooters courtesy of owning one for about 3 years and assuming your scooter is carb and has similar mechanism (BTW not able to Google your make and model it's rare) First of all check the carburettor. If the carb is blocked then you will notice the symptoms which you have mentioned , blockage at higher throttle. Check the ...


4

A car battery's power will drop with temperature. It would be my first port of call. Since the car ran fine when you had it jumpstarted with the help of your friend, I would have the battery tested to make sure that it can deliver sufficient juice to the starter.


4

One possible cause might be the 16-year old, slightly mechanically stretched timing chain that gets the "right" amount of additional elongation from the warm engine that puts the engine timing and more specifically the ignition timing out. Another component that could lead to problems with the timing chain is a faulty tensioner.


3

The car will be fine, that's just the noise the starter motor/solenoid makes when the battery is flat. The solenoid switches on the motor and engages the motor's gear with the flywheel, allowing it to turn the engine. There is a strong spring which pushes the solenoid back to its resting position after use. When the battery is very low it can't supply ...


3

The main problem would be the battery, as already pointed out. In low temperatures batteries tend to lose power, and for batteries near the end of their lifetime this means that you won't have enough current to turn the engine. Another problem would be the wrong oil chosen for the engine. Oils have grades based on their viscosity in certain temperatures - ...


3

On the starter there will be two connections. The smaller gauge wire (s terminal - blk/wht) will run from the starter to the neutral safety switch ( A/T only - right side of transmission) and then to the ignition switch. The larger gauge wire runs directly to the battery. On a M/T the wire runs straight to the ignition switch. The larger gauge wire will ...


3

You have another issue The battery doesn't sound like to the core issue that you are experiencing. I propose that your stator or rectifier have gone bad thus you are experiencing a situation where you have to have your battery serviced. The motorcycle should be 'servicing your battery' and charging it as you ride the motorcycle. You will want to test ...


3

Disconnecting the Battery One thing they could try is disconnecting the battery, starting the ignition to remove any current from within the system, reconnecting the battery and testing for the issue again to see if that has resolved the issue. Resetting the Immobiliser Otherwise you'll want to tell your friend to look at the cars user manual in order to ...


3

What is the most probable cause for this? In the most general terms, the engine isn't running because there is either too much air or too much fuel. Can the cause be that the machine was not in use for some months? Is it true that petrol may "become old" after some month so it does not burn anymore correctly? It is possible, especially if the ...


2

It sounds like your starter solenoid is bad. You starter solenoid has two pieces to it. The signal it takes from your ignition switch triggers a magnet the turns another switch when the magnet is activated it closes another circuit for your starter. This gives your starter current from the battery to turn over your engine. If I get what your saying, ...


2

I have experienced the same symptoms on an engine, where the MAF sensor was giving lower than expected readings. The engine would only run for a few seconds before stalling. A new MAF sensor fixed the problem. I tested my MAF on the bench with a hair dryer and a multimeter. It wasn't until I got a replacement that I could see how low a reading the faulty ...


2

Batteries perform better when they aren't cold so often the first time a battery fails is when it is cold so if you could heat it up a bit it would probably start the car. This may be way cars mysteriously start after sitting in the sun for a while. Also it may be harder to turn over a cold engine than a warm one so it would require a greater current draw. ...


2

For the no start you'll need to check wiring to the starter. You may or may not have an anti-theft module in your car. Is there a flashing security light when the key is in the on position? Is the battery fully charged? Here's how I would test the circuit, locate the starter relay. In your case it would be under the driver side dash. Pull the relay noting ...


2

Glow plugs are not necessarily the problem. You said the engine turned over slowly. If turning was exceedingly slow then the battery would be more likely, not enough juice for the engine to gain momentum. If the engine turns over normally but just won't start, and when it does the start is "dirty", then the glow plugs are very likely. They aren't difficult ...


2

Since the starter picked up speed as you cranked, I would suspect bad connections from the battery down to the starter. I have seen this before and simply disconnecting the large cable from the battery to the starter and cleaning the terminals with wire wool and reconnecting them totally changed the speed of the starter. Also clean the battery connectors, ...


2

I'm just spit balling here but it may be possible battery's life has come to an end. Cranking a vehicle draws a lot of current from the battery acting as a big straw that sucks current away from other components (ECU and dashboard). I would first proceed by changing the car battery. This depends on if the vehicle failed to start first time ^ The other ...


1

I don't think the it will be a flat battery, since a flat battery will usually caused a repeated clicking of the starter solenoid and a flickering of the dash lights when you turn the key. Either the contacts on the relay you can hear clicking are faulty, so there is no power getting to the starter solenoid, or the control wire on the starter solenoid has ...


1

You indicated above that there is 'soft clicking' when you try and start the car. My bet is a weak battery - you can still have headlamp power, but not enough charge in the battery to turn over the engine. Try this, turn on the headlamps and have someone stand in front and observe the lights as you turn the key to start - if the headlamps dim way down, ...


1

I agree with @James Drinkard to start by finding out if there is good enough contact between the battery and the rest of the car to support running the starter. One thing in particular to check, I know there is no noise when you try to start it, but does the voltage sag? You can have someone try to start it while you test the voltage (touch the probe to the ...


1

I would still check to voltage at the battery as I don't like to make assumptions, but I would check the terminal battery cables and clean them and the contact points on the battery. I'm fairly confident that is the issue, based on the description. If they are the universal clamp together type, unbolt those and clean that as well. All the pieces have to ...


1

I fixed this. Here is what I did: I added a fresh, new battery. It was going to be needed regardless as the battery was producing corrosion, a good sign the battery is at the end of its life. I put a fresh terminal on the damaged terminal where there was corrosion. I stripped the old wires and slapped on a 5 dollar terminal from autozone, plugged the bad ...


1

Starter/Solenoid: The starter spins your motor up, the solenoid pushes the Starter & Engine gears into contact during starting. Sometimes things get sticky from corrosion or dirt inside the Starter/Solenoid and you'll hear a click or two when you try to crank. Solution: Find your starter and give it a couple of soft to medium TAPS with a hammer (bonus ...


1

I'll try to dig out some E60, diesel-specific information if I have time, but consider the following as possible culprits: clogged fuel filter faulty fuel pump relay weak fuel pump


1

I have experience on similar situation. It was -20 degree Celsius and engine was choked on my case. As people indicated your problem could be the fuel pump. Trapped water (ice) inside the gas tank can cause failure of the pump. You may need to check if fuel pressure is ok on the engine side. This may help. Fiat Punto Wont Start. Fuel Light & Three ...


1

There are two possible reasons As mentioned by @user5626466. Improper circulation of the coolant in the engine. If you have the habit of using tap water instead of the coolant, the fine holes in the engine case which circulate the coolant to all the engine parts may got clogged and some parts might be rusted which may affect the flow of coolant. This ...



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