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Actually, the wires that you have are thus: Big fat gnarly wire is the main power wire, as you surmised. It comes directly from the battery. It provides power to the solenoid, not to the starter though (well, ultimately it gets to the starter ... I'll explain). There are two parts to the starter (in most vehicles). The larger part which actually attaches to ...


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For starting an engine, the battery should have a minimum voltage of 9V and above. if that is not available, then starter will be able to crank the engine, albeit weakly but would not be able to start the car. Low battery voltage can happen due to a defective battery or because of quiescent current consumption that drains the battery. Generally Battery is ...


2

The part of starting a car that takes the most energy is overcoming the compression inside the cylinders. When the engine is running, the fuel/air mix in each cylinder is compressed by the firing stroke of another cylinder, but when starting, the starter motor has to do it all. If you think that the engine was turning over, but it was not starting, it is ...


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When a starter is energized and cranking the engine, it will pull more power than any other electrically operated part on the vehicle. You say you think the car was cranking over ... I'd submit that maybe what you thought you heard was not what was actually happening.


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I would bet the alignment of your starter is off. If the starter is too close to the flexplate, it won't engage the teeth of the starter ring, but rather run into it and just spin. If this is the case, you'll need to see how close it is and get some shims to push it away from the flexplate a little bit. This will allow the starter to fully engage it. ...



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