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2

A bad starter is just one possibility Generic culprits for no-cranking include: bad starter bad starter relay If you don't hear a "click" when you try to start the engine this is may be worth checking faulty ignition switch If the relay doesn't click when the key is turned, but clicks when 12 V is applied to it externally, the switch might be to blame ...


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This is a typical case in the computer industry of fixed while troubleshooting. Not much else to be said.


2

Basically the answer is "no". You should leave both the ring gear on the flywheel (standard shift tranny) or flexplate (automatic tranny) and the gear on the Bendix dry. As @elmerfud stated, as long as the starter is shimmed to spec for its engagement, you'll have no issues with it. Both the ring gear and the Bendix gear are built to take the punishment. ...


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This is one of those solid "maybe" answers. If you have access, I would consult the manufacturers assembly/repair manuals for your vehicle. That will be the most correct information for you. In my experience it is generally not done, but in most cases a small amount won't hurt. It is not a continuously lubricated part nor is it usually something that is ...


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I suspect your starter failed to disengage from the flywheel even after the engine started. The screech was probably from the starter as it suddenly began to spin at a rate much greater than it was designed to do. This shouldn't hurt the engine or flywheel, but it will shorten the life of the starter if it continues. If you're lucky, this may not happen ...


1

I think you're spot on with the 'engaging the starter for too long' thought - I suspect it got stuck and didn't return properly. Hopefully it won't have damaged anything, but if it continues you might find it wrecks the starter...


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These are the maximum capacity of the leads. You should use the highest you can bear to carry or purchase, simply because the resistance should be lower (theoretically) and they will sustain a short circuit for slightly longer before melting. When we speak of current, it is not the leads we worry about, it is the load we are putting on the "source", ...


3

Just had the same issue on my 2004 Honda . Before replacing the starter, take a look at the ground strap on the starter itself. Mine was corroded . Cleaned it with sandpaper and put some rust / corrosion inhibitor on it and it has been working fine. Hope this saves someone from buying a new starter unnecessarily.


3

Those numbers are the max that they can supply. Your starter will "automatically" use as much as it needs up to the max. If the starter needs more than those units can supply, the jumper will only provide its max. If your battery is only partly dead, i.e. it won't start, but the interior lights come on, you can use a smaller jumper than if your battery ...


6

The amp count tells you the maximum amount of current that the equipment can supply. Eg. Your car needs 600 amps to start: The 1000 amp jumper can handle it. Your car needs 1200 amps: The 1000 amp jumper can't do it. You'll have to find a bigger one. Be aware that this does not apply to voltage. If you have a 6V battery and you connect it to a 12V ...


9

The starter circuit should only draw whatever current it needs so the excess shouldn't cause any problem.



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