Hot answers tagged

10

Your battery was dead. In many cars, when the battery can't provide enough cranking amps, you will hear a clicking instead of the normal starting sound. The starter battery draws a lot of current. When that happens, the voltage available to the rest of the system drops dramatically, especially if the battery is weak. That's why your clock reset itself. ...


9

Upon the regular engine starting key turn area the dash lights dim and there maybe a single 'tch sound or no sound at all coming from the engine block. Sadly, I know this sound well. This sounds like a dead battery. Here are the steps that I would suggest: Charge the battery with a plug-in battery charger. They aren't terribly expensive to ...


9

The starter circuit should only draw whatever current it needs so the excess shouldn't cause any problem.


7

As I’ve read, alternative starting systems nowadays used mostly in commercial, industrial and emergency applications, where it is mission-critical to get it started, such as back-up power generator in the hospital, fire pump on an oil rig, or a life boat. Redundancy is required in some of these situations; in others there is no other option even. There are ...


7

It depends specifically on what's wrong with the starter. Sometimes you hear a clicking sound when you turn the key but the starter motor gears don't actually turn. This could actually be due to a weak battery, but if you know the battery has a full charge, then it could be the starter gears actually failing to turn. You may hear a whining sound, ...


7

Starters quite commonly need to have "shims" added when they are installed. These thin pieces of metal act as spacers to make sure the gear on the starter lines up exactly with the teeth of the flywheel. If the starter is out of position even slightly, it can cause the starter to get "stuck" and remain engaged until the gear finally slides back into place. ...


7

I work for a fleet delivery service. Due to safety regulations all vehicles must be shut off at every delivery point. This equals up to 150 stops a day. The starter motors fail with regularity. In most cases 3 times or more a year. Ignition switches about twice a year, and fly wheels every 2 years. While you won't see this type of abuse,stuff will wear out. ...


6

You should be fine in that instance. I wouldn't make a habit of it. The rule I was taught was crank for no more than 15 seconds and let the started cool for a few minutes in between. The goal is to keep the starter from overheating so your time is cumulative. It shouldn't take more than 3 - 5 seconds of cranking to start the engine. Based on that you could ...


6

The amp count tells you the maximum amount of current that the equipment can supply. Eg. Your car needs 600 amps to start: The 1000 amp jumper can handle it. Your car needs 1200 amps: The 1000 amp jumper can't do it. You'll have to find a bigger one. Be aware that this does not apply to voltage. If you have a 6V battery and you connect it to a 12V ...


6

It can actually be the solenoid or the brushes which are at fault and take to getting a beating ... those masochistic machines! They just like it for some reason, lol. Most solenoids are built with a large copper washer in the end of them. When the solenoid is energized, the plunger is sucked into the solenoid via electromagnetic forces and pushes the ...


6

Two possible failed parts: The ignition switch or the starter relay. The ignition switch would be either not returning to run or has failed electrically. The relay would have to be stuck on or commanded on by the Security ECU. The security system is not supposed to turn on the starter only stop it from working. It is the least likely failure.


6

If you are hearing the starter turn (typical starter whir), the most probable problem would be the one way clutch has gone out. It's the part of the starter with the teeth on it which engages the starter ring gear. If the solenoid has gone out, the starter motor will not spin, because the solenoid is the part which forces a large copper washer into the posts ...


5

It sounds to me like a dead battery. Depending on how accurate your voltmeter is, what you see as 12V may be 11.9V or lower. To give you an idea, an open circuit battery terminal voltage of 11.7V indicates a completely uncharged battery. What you are describing happened to me once with a Volvo car, due to a faulty switch in the glove-box; the glove-box ...


5

As starter motors get old they can require higher current in order to turn successfully, so despite you having no obvious power problem I would first check your battery - also because this is a simple thing to replace if necessary. It could indeed be the starter solenoid, so having a look at both this and the starter motor itself would probably be my next ...


5

This sounds like a classic case of "heat soak". In most Chevy V-8's the exhaust pipe runs very close to the starter. The starter absorbs the heat, the heat increases the electrical resistance along with expanding the metal parts. The combination of the two can result in sluggish starts when the engine is hot. The symptons get worse as the starter ages. The ...


5

Sticky solenoid like Mac said. Or, a loose ground strap. Or, just a dead spot on the starter. It certainly can happen. It's probably something that replacing the starter would fix, but not necessarily (example being the one I had where it was a ground strap the detached and was just sometimes resting in the right spot. Replacing the starter didn't help, ...


5

The cranking amps required to start an engine are not the same as the cranking amp rating of a battery. I don't know the amps required to start your car's engine, but if it is less than 400 amps, then it will work. Higher cranking amps in a battery yields additional benefits. The battery can be used for more starts because less capacity is used on each ...


5

This is called "run on" of the starter. It doesn't cause a huge issue if it doesn't happen too much or for too long, but basically the Bendix stays engaged in the flywheel ring gear an is being then driven by the engine. To further explain, the Bendix (or pinion drive mechanism) is the part on the end of the starter armature which engages the flywheel (or ...


5

If the picture you have attached is similar to the starter on you car, then the power to the starter motor is only delivered if the solenoid operates, so the solenoid must be working. However, the shift lever labelled in the picture, that pushes the pinion forward to engage with the flywheel may be broken, that would explain your problem. Your problem ...


4

If the dash lights dim and the starter doesn't turn, it's usually either the battery going bad or the starter that's at fault. I'd check the battery voltage both without any consumers and with someone trying to operate the starter motor and would expect at least 12.8V (no load) and about 10V (trying to start), otherwise the battery is dead. If the battery ...


4

Beyond what jmort253 said, and separated out into a specific answer at Bob Cross' suggestion: I ran into a particular difficult to track down problem which was caused by the clutch in the starter opening up. The starter would wind up and make a screeching sound, but sometimes wouldn't turn the engine over. I was thinking it might be a broken tooth on the ...


4

99% of the time, the symptoms that you describe are a dead or dying battery. Charging the battery or jumpstarting the car should work. The 'green stuff' is caused by the terminal oxidising - it's not good to have it on there but I doubt it'll affect the connection enough to make the battery unusable. Often, carefully pouring hot water over it will dissolve ...


4

It's possible that your battery has enough charge to light the headlights and dash, but not enough to turn the starter. Typically though in this case you will hear some sort of click when you turn the ignition to "start." Your description says you hear nothing, however. That points me to consider that some sort of an electrical interlock (safety system) is ...


4

Mine has just such a fancy emergency backup starting device. It's called a "manual transmission". Push starts great with a dead battery. Only downside would be the serial killer chasing me, and well, that's what they make concealed weapons licenses for...


4

You should do a load test on your battery and see if you have a damaged cell. If this is not the case, check for a parasitic draw test on your vehicle, which basically tells you if something is on and draining your battery.


4

It certainly shouldn't hurt anything, but it is unlikely to help either as the wires to your starter should be appropriate anyway. If your wiring is old then you may see an improvement, otherwise I would suggest leaving it alone.


4

Just had the same issue on my 2004 Honda . Before replacing the starter, take a look at the ground strap on the starter itself. Mine was corroded . Cleaned it with sandpaper and put some rust / corrosion inhibitor on it and it has been working fine. Hope this saves someone from buying a new starter unnecessarily.


4

I tried again, this time connecting the positive battery lead to the low-amp solenoid input terminal (which was harder to reach -- that's why I didn't try it before) instead of directly to the starter motor, and it started just fine. So presumably the solenoid must be actuating some kind of mechanical linkage between the starter motor and engine rather than ...


4

This sounds like there is an issue with the ground at the battery. Sometimes it appears there is a good connection there (especially when using side post terminals), yet there is only enough of a connection to allow the low amperage stuff to work. Then, when you turn the key, the starter starts to engage, but then continuity is lost because there is not ...


4

The idea isn't to replace the amperage of the battery, but to boost (add to) what charge is available from your battery. The lower amperage output is fairly typical. For this reason and for the simple reason that these devices are made to be portable. If it had the same amperage as the battery in your car, it would weight about the same amount. Since your ...



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