Hot answers tagged

14

Your battery was dead. In many cars, when the battery can't provide enough cranking amps, you will hear a clicking instead of the normal starting sound. The starter battery draws a lot of current. When that happens, the voltage available to the rest of the system drops dramatically, especially if the battery is weak. That's why your clock reset itself. ...


10

The starter circuit should only draw whatever current it needs so the excess shouldn't cause any problem.


10

I believe your clutch safety switch has been damaged You have a switch underneath your clutch lever. It forces you to pull the clutch in to start the bike. There is a small phillips head #2 screw that holds in place. It can be adjusted and slid back and forth to engage properly with the clutch lever. You can see where the switch hits the lever if you ...


9

Upon the regular engine starting key turn area the dash lights dim and there maybe a single 'tch sound or no sound at all coming from the engine block. Sadly, I know this sound well. This sounds like a dead battery. Here are the steps that I would suggest: Charge the battery with a plug-in battery charger. They aren't terribly expensive to ...


9

Short answer: Yes. Long answer: Maybe? As long as it is a 12v motorcycle starter relay you should be fine. The problem is whether or not it will fit your bike physically (that is whether the size of the solenoid will fit into the compartment designated in your motorcycle, and whether you have bullet, spade etc etc). I have used a few of the cheap Chinese ...


8

I work for a fleet delivery service. Due to safety regulations all vehicles must be shut off at every delivery point. This equals up to 150 stops a day. The starter motors fail with regularity. In most cases 3 times or more a year. Ignition switches about twice a year, and fly wheels every 2 years. While you won't see this type of abuse,stuff will wear out. ...


7

As I’ve read, alternative starting systems nowadays used mostly in commercial, industrial and emergency applications, where it is mission-critical to get it started, such as back-up power generator in the hospital, fire pump on an oil rig, or a life boat. Redundancy is required in some of these situations; in others there is no other option even. There are ...


7

It depends specifically on what's wrong with the starter. Sometimes you hear a clicking sound when you turn the key but the starter motor gears don't actually turn. This could actually be due to a weak battery, but if you know the battery has a full charge, then it could be the starter gears actually failing to turn. You may hear a whining sound, ...


7

The amp count tells you the maximum amount of current that the equipment can supply. Eg. Your car needs 600 amps to start: The 1000 amp jumper can handle it. Your car needs 1200 amps: The 1000 amp jumper can't do it. You'll have to find a bigger one. Be aware that this does not apply to voltage. If you have a 6V battery and you connect it to a 12V ...


7

Starters quite commonly need to have "shims" added when they are installed. These thin pieces of metal act as spacers to make sure the gear on the starter lines up exactly with the teeth of the flywheel. If the starter is out of position even slightly, it can cause the starter to get "stuck" and remain engaged until the gear finally slides back into place. ...


7

If the picture you have attached is similar to the starter on you car, then the power to the starter motor is only delivered if the solenoid operates, so the solenoid must be working. However, the shift lever labelled in the picture, that pushes the pinion forward to engage with the flywheel may be broken, that would explain your problem. Your problem ...


7

If you are hearing the starter turn (typical starter whir), the most probable problem would be the one way clutch has gone out. It's the part of the starter with the teeth on it which engages the starter ring gear. If the solenoid has gone out, the starter motor will not spin, because the solenoid is the part which forces a large copper washer into the posts ...


7

You can still do it in a way. Just press the clutch before engaging the starter and let it go. The car will jump forward and move. Some cars might now allow the starter to continue operating. But you can keep doing the same thing over and over.


6

You should be fine in that instance. I wouldn't make a habit of it. The rule I was taught was crank for no more than 15 seconds and let the started cool for a few minutes in between. The goal is to keep the starter from overheating so your time is cumulative. It shouldn't take more than 3 - 5 seconds of cranking to start the engine. Based on that you could ...


6

As starter motors get old they can require higher current in order to turn successfully, so despite you having no obvious power problem I would first check your battery - also because this is a simple thing to replace if necessary. It could indeed be the starter solenoid, so having a look at both this and the starter motor itself would probably be my next ...


6

As discussed in the comments already, the clicking you hear is probably the starter solenoid. You have ruled out a weak battery being the probable cause by attempting to the jump-start the engine. This means either the power cable running directly from the battery to the starter motor is too resistive/poorly connected, or that the starter motor itself is no ...


6

It could also be the Crank Position Sensor. It is mounted on the flywheel cover and if it gets contaminated with dust from the clutch it can stop the engine from starting. It confuses the average guy as it looks like either a fuel or ignition problem. It is held in position with two bolts. Might be awkward to get to. Hope this helps.


6

This is called "run on" of the starter. It doesn't cause a huge issue if it doesn't happen too much or for too long, but basically the Bendix stays engaged in the flywheel ring gear an is being then driven by the engine. To further explain, the Bendix (or pinion drive mechanism) is the part on the end of the starter armature which engages the flywheel (or ...


6

It can actually be the solenoid or the brushes which are at fault and take to getting a beating ... those masochistic machines! They just like it for some reason, lol. Most solenoids are built with a large copper washer in the end of them. When the solenoid is energized, the plunger is sucked into the solenoid via electromagnetic forces and pushes the ...


6

Two possible failed parts: The ignition switch or the starter relay. The ignition switch would be either not returning to run or has failed electrically. The relay would have to be stuck on or commanded on by the Security ECU. The security system is not supposed to turn on the starter only stop it from working. It is the least likely failure.


6

I recommend you carry out the following steps: Have the starter relay tested. From the description provided (old starter was clicking) this may actually be fine but it is so easy to verify that it works it would be silly to not rule this out as the source of the problem. After locating the starter relay, have someone turn the key in the ignition to start ...


6

Typically I've only seen three posts on the starter solenoid. The thickest one is for power from the battery. There is also a much small one which is for ignition switch (S). The last one is for a coil pack (R). Typically the starter solenoid is self grounded. When jumping you simply make a connection between the B and S. This activates the solenoid and ...


6

This appears to be the main starter relay. It can very well be the issue to your problem. A relay provides a way to get a higher amperage circuit through to things like the starter solenoid without having all that amperage go through the starter switch itself. I would bet replacing this part would fix your issue. You can try giving it a good rap with the ...


5

It sounds to me like a dead battery. Depending on how accurate your voltmeter is, what you see as 12V may be 11.9V or lower. To give you an idea, an open circuit battery terminal voltage of 11.7V indicates a completely uncharged battery. What you are describing happened to me once with a Volvo car, due to a faulty switch in the glove-box; the glove-box ...


5

Beyond what jmort253 said, and separated out into a specific answer at Bob Cross' suggestion: I ran into a particular difficult to track down problem which was caused by the clutch in the starter opening up. The starter would wind up and make a screeching sound, but sometimes wouldn't turn the engine over. I was thinking it might be a broken tooth on the ...


5

This sounds like a classic case of "heat soak". In most Chevy V-8's the exhaust pipe runs very close to the starter. The starter absorbs the heat, the heat increases the electrical resistance along with expanding the metal parts. The combination of the two can result in sluggish starts when the engine is hot. The symptons get worse as the starter ages. The ...


5

Sticky solenoid like Mac said. Or, a loose ground strap. Or, just a dead spot on the starter. It certainly can happen. It's probably something that replacing the starter would fix, but not necessarily (example being the one I had where it was a ground strap the detached and was just sometimes resting in the right spot. Replacing the starter didn't help, ...


5

I tried again, this time connecting the positive battery lead to the low-amp solenoid input terminal (which was harder to reach -- that's why I didn't try it before) instead of directly to the starter motor, and it started just fine. So presumably the solenoid must be actuating some kind of mechanical linkage between the starter motor and engine rather than ...


5

The cranking amps required to start an engine are not the same as the cranking amp rating of a battery. I don't know the amps required to start your car's engine, but if it is less than 400 amps, then it will work. Higher cranking amps in a battery yields additional benefits. The battery can be used for more starts because less capacity is used on each ...


5

While your question is pretty thorough, I'm assuming a few things in this answer that you didn't clarify; When you crank the engine, and it doesn't start, I'm assuming it's a smooth crank without hiccups. By that I mean it isn't trying to start, it just cranks. You have the petrol model, not a diesel. It uses an electronic push-button start mechanism. ...



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