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11

What it comes down to is there are trade offs. In the case of the engine, it's torque output and rotating mass versus engine speed ... read on. First, it isn't power which is needed, but torque to keep an engine running. In the early days of engines, each had one cylinder and didn't run very fast. To keep it running, it had a very large flywheel attached to ...


7

An insufficiently-charged battery would explain what you're seeing: the unresponsive throttle is because the throttle is electronically-actuated (at least that's what eBay reckons) Not sure about the Sentra, but airbag and engine oil lights can turn on due to insufficient voltage the engine will stall because the fuel injectors need electricity to ...


6

No. Stalling the car will not damage your car , your car is designed to absorb the impact at least a hundred times.(Most of my family members learnt driving in my car and it has stalled half of its life and its working perfectly) Stalling the car extremely frequently especially with load(passengers) can put additional stress on the transmission components ...


5

Problems like this are addressed in Charles Probst's excellent reference, Bosch Fuel Injection & Engine Management. From what I can gather, the Mk1 Golf utilizes a basic K-Jetronic system illustrated in the diagram below1 (which operates on the principle of continuous injection). The stalling symptom is an indication that the air-fuel mixture is not ...


5

To add to Zaids answer. A cheap meter from RadioShack will tell you if something is wrong with your power system. A normal car battery will be at 14.4 volts (+-.75v) when on. 7.10V is not normal and indicates a problem. As for your gas petal, not accelerating is a necessary safety feature implemented by all manufactures that use digital throttles. ...


3

There is a sidestand switch that kills the motor if you attempt to put it into gear with the sidestand down, it's a safety measure. Check that switch at the top of your sidestand to see if the a mount bolt or nut has fallen out thereby loosening the switch and making the vehicle inoperable when you put it into gear.


3

Possible Answers We were hoping for a little feedback regarding this issue prior to attempting an answer. A few things come to mind regarding the problem description and we'll run through a few of them for you. Regarding Stalling Fuel Line - Your fuel filter may be impeded and require replacement. Since you have not indicated this happens at higher ...


3

The idle air control valve is integrated into the throttle body unit as shown here: It may not look exactly like that, there was an update some time around then but the parts are very similar and the principles are the same. There is a forum thread with a few more pictures of the cleaning process here: ...


3

All EFI engines shut off the fuel injectors when the accelerator is released above a certain RPM or speed (varies by manufacturer). It's easier to detect on newer model cars with a digital instant fuel economy gauge where when cruising at 55 MPH and the accelerator pedal is released, the economy readout will shoot from 30 MPG to the highest number or the ...


3

The most common cause of this complex of symptoms is leaking intake manifold gaskets. Test for this by spraying a squirt of carburetor cleaner up and around the intake manifold. If the engine smooths out for a few seconds then there is a leak. The second most common cause is failure of the mass air flow sensor (MAF). I offer no quick tests for this part ...


3

In this case replacing the fuel filter for new seems to have done the trick. I was able to find one for roughly £27 on eBay and fitted it myself in under 45 minutes. Thought I'd leave the information here in case anyone else has the same issue.


3

Your Problem There are a few reasons that you might have your engine cut out. If you have any error codes (found by plugging in a scan tool to the OBDII port on your car), they would help dramatically in being able to narrow down the array of possible answers to your problem. If you do have a faulty connection, which I don't think you do, then a code ...


2

I will explain it for an EFI engine with a manual transmission because it might not be as straight forward with a carbureted engine or automatic. For ease of explaining this I will consider the engine as "on" whenever the ignition switch is set to the "on" state. This means that the ECU is on and is monitoring the engine state and controlling it's behavior. ...


2

I think you need a new stator. Your problem sounds like there are loose connections or there may be reason that the bike is not charging properly. I think you start checking all the basics first and check the battery to make sure it is good. Check the volts on your battery with voltmeter.


2

I eventually found the issue: the fuel lifter pump was faulty. For those that dont know, the Mk1 has 2 fuel pumps - the main one underneath the car (or, on some variations, in the engine bay) and a 2nd 'lifter' or 'transfer' pump that sits inside the fuel tank and can be accessed by removing the rear seat. This 2nd pump's bearing were gone. The primary pump ...


2

The engine is optimized to be efficient at high rpm or at low rpm (racing engine or cement mixer design respectively) but it can't be efficient at every possible speed so it is up to the driver to choose the best gear and speed to match the capabilities of the motor he has, i.e. keep it revving at an appropriate rpm for the speed/torque demanded of that ...


2

The sensor should not cause the engine to stall. All of the accessories not working (power steering and brakes) would be normal with a stalled engine. What I would be looking at is the fuel pump might be going bad. A mechanic can easily check this by placing a fuel pressure sensor on the fuel line to check the pressure. If the engine is losing fuel pressure, ...


2

Turns out it was because of my stand being down :/ I've not been riding for too long and didn't even know they had that kill feature, am glad it is there, un-glad i had to walk! :)


2

The engine computer looses is idle speed learning whenever it drops below nine volts even for a short time. The problem here is the starting battery or its connections. Hook up a voltmeter across the battery terminals then crank the engine for 15 seconds. The voltage should remain above 9.6 volts. If the voltage drops below nine the computer will loose the ...


2

I took the care to the a mechanic and they said it was or could be two things: When the battery dies sometimes the internal computer\memory needs to be reset. The car's throttle body needed cleaning. So far it has not stalled after having both of these done (5 days now). Not sure which of the above actually of the above fixed the issue ... maybe both. ...


2

I have experienced the same symptoms on an engine, where the MAF sensor was giving lower than expected readings. The engine would only run for a few seconds before stalling. A new MAF sensor fixed the problem. I tested my MAF on the bench with a hair dryer and a multimeter. It wasn't until I got a replacement that I could see how low a reading the faulty ...


1

Check the idle air controller actuation and internals, it may be stuck in one position, or clogged. If the IAC is stuck in an open position, it can recycle too much oxygen depleted exhaust to the intake and kill the engine. If clogged it can throw engine management out of wack. You'll find the IAC connecting the exhaust to the intake in some way, and it ...


1

Sounds to me like the IAC valve (Idle Air Control Valve) needs to be replaced. It's not a hard thing to replace. The IAC opens and closes to allow air into the throttle body when the throttle blade(s) are closed (which is at idle). It might be dirty or have debris lodged in it which is causing it to act up. I've been able to replace them on older 2005 ...


1

There should be no issue with your vehicle or its engine. Most vehicle manufacturers have set the "idiot light" to come on if the oil pressure drops below ~5psi. Obviously you've hit that threshold. Oil remains on parts for a fairly decent amount of time even if there isn't any oil flow. It doesn't take long for the oil to be gone. You'll have caused more ...


1

You will have done no damage. The light was indicating low oil pressure, but a brief moment like that will not be a problem. Never ignore the oil pressure light if it stays on even if you think you will be home in a few minutes. It doesn't take long driving with no oil to getting to the moving parts to cause damage. In the second or so that you ...


1

If you are turning the wheel all the way (left or right) until it stops, this is called cramping the steering. What happens is, when you get it all the way over to one side and hold it there, the rack and pinion is telling the hydraulic fluid to continue to push the steering over to that side, but the steering mechanism cannot do it because it cannot go any ...


1

From the symptoms, I think the power steering belt will be slipping under the load at low engine speed.


1

Could be a very dirty throttle body. If the engine is very worn, there could be a lot of gasses/oil vapours being blown into the air intake which could cause a build-up of gunk around the throttle butterfly and idle control valve. This could block the required air for idle, which would then cause the engine to stall. Try taking the intake pipe off the ...


1

Where did you get your vehicle serviced? I am pretty sure that '94 Concordes don't have carburetors; so I am curious who charged you for this service and if it is a wise idea to go back to them. That year/model is fuel injected and they could have service your fuel injection system, but that is different that a carb cleaning; you should verify with your ...


1

This sounds like a problem with the Idle Air Control (IAC) valve, or something in that general vicinity. You should try to clean it and the upper intake tract.



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