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20

I would say this would be fine to drive slowly and carefully over short distances (I've had worse) - but things to be careful of: potholes speed bumps (seriously - watch out) cornering hard high speeds Also try and avoid braking or accelerating hard - gently come to a stop at lights etc as you want to avoid too much nose travel up and down. Get it to ...


11

Ducati use desmodromic valve systems because it provides for; A more faithful adherence to both; (1A) Not just high speed Valvetrain timing. (1B) But also high acceleration Valvetrain rates; regardless of what weight/material the valve is made from. The latter (1B) - which can provide an advantage over the pneumatic Valvetrain design approach - ...


9

It is always recommended to replace suspecsion and braking components on both sides of the same axle at the same time, wherever possible. Both will currently be the same age - if one has failed, it is likely that the other is in a similar condition and so could easily fail soon. In the case of springs, the constant flexing of the metal can eventually lead ...


7

Springs do wear out overtime or with severe duty use. You can determine if they are sagging by checking the ride height. Where this measurement is taken and what is normal varies with each vehicle type and brand. They spring is what determines ride height as it the component that is supporting the vehicles weight. One of the leading causes of spring failure ...


6

The late 60s to early 70s mustangs has shocks and springs on the upper control arms. Normally They are installed on the lower control arm to save space. By fitting them between the control arms the towers don't have to be as tall or the shock/spring could be mounted directly to the frame.


6

It's not that bad. I wouldn't go driving fast or anything, but you should be okay. There are guys who cut the springs on their Honda Civics (it's always Honda Civics for some reason) to make them lower and they seem to be doing okay.


6

A fairly common issue on cars with strut suspension are broken springs. As the strut wears it looses its ability to control spring dampening. This allows the spring to compress and expand faster and farther than designed. Over time the spring weakens and breaks. The break many times occurs at the very last turns of the spring and may go unnoticed. Look at ...


6

The goal was to prevent valve float at higher rpms. Given the metallurgy of the day it required a lot of spring pressure to ensure that the spring was push the valve closed. The desmo unit mechanically forces the valve closed as opposed to using spring pressure. This would allow an engine to run at a higher rpm then a unit with a conventional spring poppet ...


5

I don't know the specifics of that car, so I'm going to take a stab and assume we're talking about coil springs. Springs only squeak where they contact something else, which is why spraying them didn't help. If you can't see anything else in contact with the spring have a look at the top and bottom seats. Those seats sometimes wear. Not necessarily all the ...


4

You have the spring rate (you call it spring constant) so you can calculate it yourself. ;) The spring rate is the amount of force (weight/mass) the spring requires to compress the specified amount. For example, your OEM front springs compress 1 inch when you put 146 pounds on it. So, with the numbers you provided the OEM height can be calculated. The car ...


4

With broken springs, wheels tend to "jump": on average, the wheel will spend less time in contact with the ground, especially when the road is slightly bumpy. This reduced braking efficiency. For the short term, reducing your driving speed will lower your need for braking, and thus compensate this effect. Be warned that willingly driving with such a known ...


3

I would check/replace the strut's top mount. The rubber may be worn allowing excessive movement at the top of the strut. Try pulling in the strut to see if the top mount moves excessively. If the rubber looks OK and nothing is worn, try loosening the mounting bolts and see if it can be relocated slightly to move the spring away from the panel it is ...


3

There is a hazard from the broken part of the spring as there may be a possibility of this dislodging from the remaining part and contacting the tyre. This could then damage the tyre wall and cause a blow out. It could also fall into the road causing a hazard (being picked up by lorry wheel and thrown into passing car. Just had spring break after 105K miles ...


3

I agree with @ Rory Alsop that yes the car can be driven short distances at reasonable speed in order to get it replaced. Be aware that the broken spring no longer has the formed end that positions in the strut. While many people do cut their springs, it is a calculated cut hopefully balancing ride height and spring rate. In my experience the most common ...


2

Here are some points which you should look for in your suspension to determine whether you need to change them or not. 1. Bumpy Ride Drive the car on some rough roads, if you can feel all of the slightest bumps then unfortunately your coils are wearing out and you need to fix them. Also drive on a pothole in low speed, does your suspension does full travel?...


2

Are you sure the springs are the source of the squeaking? It could be some other moving part of the front suspension, perhaps with a worn bushing.


2

Having just replaced a single coil on my 12 year old car, I can tell you that the handling has been significantly affected. The car now tends to oversteer and no longer handles bumps as it used to. I will be replacing the second coil immediately.


2

I had the same thing - a broken spring at a rear wheel. I did drive it a few months till I got to fix it (I was a student and I didn't have enough money at the time) but I did go slower and been more careful and things worked out. Go slower, be more careful and repair it as fast as you can.


1

The only time springs usually go bad is if the shocks/struts are no longer functioning. If a vehicle has bad shock/struts and is allowed to bounce all over the place, the springs become worn out. If the shocks/struts are replaced when required, you should have no fear of the springs. You can always do an inspection of the springs. Reasons to replace them: ...


1

It is illegal and totally dangerous to drive the car like that. Regardless of how small the spring break is. Its broken - it now affects the entire suspension, handling in that case, steering and brakes. Life is more important. Yours and everybody else.



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