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1

To expand upon Paulsters answer, the middle part is often called a damper in the UK as often as it's called a shock absorber. Which is a good word as it dampens the springs. Ideally, the weight of the car sits on the spring part, but without the shock you'd be bouncing up and down for the whole journey! So the damper simply dampens the spring back to ...


4

The shock you have shown is called a "coil over shock absorber". The shock which is located in the center of the spring, functions just like any other shock absorber. It will most likely have hydraulic oil with baffles. It may or may not be gas charged. The shock casing is made stronger than a regular shock, mainly to support the spring. You'll also notice ...


1

It depends vehicle specs, road conditions and driving habits. Shock absorbers are not carry the weight of the car, they are basically dampers. They restrict the amount of movement. In case of bump they compress and allow certain amount of resistance to slow down the movement. In rebound, basically the same function. So, without them, related wheel tend to ...


3

The key assumption in the OP's question was that replacement in pairs was because if one failed then the other must be close. It's actually about making them the same. Unless the car has a tiny number of miles on it, the two struts will always be in different parts of their lives. That means the original one will always be more worn than the replacement ...


4

Brakes and suspension should always be done in pairs. If you REALLY don't care about the car, you could just replace the one, but it could lead to alignment/tire wear/vehicle stability issues down the road.



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