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9

Shocks/struts can either come charged with nitrogen (gas shock) or conventional (without a charge). Both can wear out over time. Shocks should be replaced around 50k miles under normal conditions. That really depends on how you drive your vehicle, though. If all of your driving is done on the freeways of Texas where the straights are longer than long, then ...


8

Overview In terms of rebuilding the shock, there are similarities between models but there are unique differences between them that make it impossible to review all of the nuance. I'll only give a high level response to the rebuilding component. Adjustment You asked. I can't figure out the low/high speed or the rebound/compression dampening. I'm ...


6

The late 60s to early 70s mustangs has shocks and springs on the upper control arms. Normally They are installed on the lower control arm to save space. By fitting them between the control arms the towers don't have to be as tall or the shock/spring could be mounted directly to the frame.


5

The shock you have shown is called a "coil over shock absorber". The shock which is located in the center of the spring, functions just like any other shock absorber. It will most likely have hydraulic oil with baffles. It may or may not be gas charged. The shock casing is made stronger than a regular shock, mainly to support the spring. You'll also notice ...


4

It depends vehicle specs, road conditions and driving habits. Shock absorbers are not carry the weight of the car, they are basically dampers. They restrict the amount of movement. In case of bump they compress and allow certain amount of resistance to slow down the movement. In rebound, basically the same function. So, without them, related wheel tend to ...


4

Brakes and suspension should always be done in pairs. If you REALLY don't care about the car, you could just replace the one, but it could lead to alignment/tire wear/vehicle stability issues down the road.


4

"Hand priming" or actuation is effectively worthless as a gauge on the performance of a Shock/Strut Assy. Only when severely damaged or out of service will the activity show any truly noticeable difference. And by priming the shock, you're effectively wasting your time. It will do so on its own. The reason why this "works" is occasionally air or gas may slip ...


3

Hand Priming Shocks of Various Dampeners/Struts is Urban Legend This myth has been perpetuated over time and has gained legs and therefore credibility. Yes, it's true that the gas and oil separate on the shelf lying horizontally. It's also true that they separate on the shelf if stored vertically, piston rod up or down. But it doesn't matter. These ...


3

The key assumption in the OP's question was that replacement in pairs was because if one failed then the other must be close. It's actually about making them the same. Unless the car has a tiny number of miles on it, the two struts will always be in different parts of their lives. That means the original one will always be more worn than the replacement ...


2

Wait what? Let's look at some physics here. If you have less grip in the front, your car understeers, you hit the tree and you die. If you have less grip in the rear, you ovesteer, you hit the tree and die again, not seeing what killed you. 1. Rear end Grip Shocks are important to maintain the balance of the vehicle in a turn and ensure contact of the ...


1

Cool car! The shock absorbers for an 1982 Audi 4000 should fit an 1982 Audi 80 - the 4000 is pretty much an 80 with some slight body changes for the US market (I believe bumpers, trims and lights). However do take a look at the year closely, if I remember correctly there was an updated model in production between 1984 and 1986. The platform is still ...


1

To expand upon Paulsters answer, the middle part is often called a damper in the UK as often as it's called a shock absorber. Which is a good word as it dampens the springs. Ideally, the weight of the car sits on the spring part, but without the shock you'd be bouncing up and down for the whole journey! So the damper simply dampens the spring back to ...


1

Rear - on each side, the shock will be bolted to the frame and the axle. Front - on each side, connected to the lower control arm and the frame. Easy to get to, but they might be rusty. Spray the nuts/bolts down with PB. I usually just go for whatever is cheap by a well known brand (Monroe, kyb, etc.). Try to keep them all the same brand/product ...



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