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9

What is a shock absorber? I'm going to answer the basic title question with a carefully selected quote from the great Wikipedia: ... their intended sole purpose is to dampen spring oscillations. Think of how you want your car to ride when driving down a smooth road that has a bump or pothole. You expect to feel a mild jolt when the car travels ...


7

The question is can I just go out and buy any 17mm bolt that is the same length as the current one, No. or is there some kind of material requirement? Yes. Think about the jobs that those bolts are doing: they support the steady state mass of the vehicle and the transient spring loads of the transmission. That means that those bolts need to ...


7

A simple test that you can perform in your own driveway is: For each corner of the car, push down hard several times (the car should be bouncing visibly up and down) When pushed down, release and watch The car should bounce upwards (above the normal resting point) and then immediately settle at the resting point. Additional bouncing indicates worn or ...


6

Yes, you need to replace both shocks at the same time. One new shock can (and will) have an adverse effect on the handling and thus safety. A new shock has different damping characteristics as the old one and it can lead to weird steering behaviour, loss of grip on one wheel, etc.


5

Definitely replace them in pairs, depending on the wear of them you might even have to replace all four as combining worn shocks with new ones can (a) have very undesirable effects on the handling and (b) tends to accelerate wear on the already worn shocks, leading to even more (a).


4

You have a couple of simultaneous questions going on here: You have an older / non-new car. Should you have to replace the shocks? Shocks wear out over time and mileage. I'm going to be replacing the wife's shocks this weekend (assuming they arrive on schedule). The existing shocks have at least 50K miles on them so they're at the end of their expected ...


3

Realistically, there's not a whole lot you can do. What will help though is to clean them periodically, especially where the parts slide in and out of each other. The objective being to keep foreign matter away from the seals. Depending on shocker design a high pressure cleaner can be quite useful here. A common cause of rapid shocker failure is faulty ...


2

If properly installed, there's really nothing to be done. As mentioned above, you can clean them to prevent the seals from being damaged by grit. Most setups have covers over them anyways that keeps most of the dirt out. Those covers tend to fall apart after a few years though. Either way, I don't think I've ever seen a failure due to seal damage. Have ...


2

As long as your cousin isn't using the bike for jumps and stunts, and is just riding it on roads this shouldn't pose a problem. As @Bob pointed out in the comment below - the spring is what takes the weight. The damper is what slows down the movement of the spring, preventing bouncing. If the shock bottoms out under his weight, then it may damage the ...


2

With respect to your original question: What is a damper? A damper (AKA strut or shock absorber) is "a mechanical device designed to dissipate kinetic energy." In it's automotive use, it works with the springs to absorb the impact of bumps and rough spots in the road before those impacts bother your car and the passengers therein. In answering a ...


2

It may be listed under "strut assembly" (either McPherson or Chapman, depending on which one you need). These days cars normally have struts. About the only place a true standalone shock absorber is seen anymore is on trucks.


2

Checking several on line vendors specs the 40mm or 60mm refers to the amount of lowering from stock. If your stock spring leaves 100mm of tire clearance a 40mm spring would leave 60 mm of clearance. Several things must be taken into account prior to selecting your springs. Your car may already be lower than stock due to the age and condition of the springs. ...


1

Too easy with a basic set of tools, a jack and jackstands. Let's start at the front. Jack the truck up and put it on jackstands, you'll need the jack to raise and lower the wheel which is why you need the jackstands. The shock bolts into two places, at the top in a 'shock-hoop' and at the bottom at the control arm. Unbolt the bolts from the control arm, ...


1

Not sure why you want to replace the bolts you should be able to reuse the original bolts. If you do decide you want new replacement bolts make sure to get the correct size. Bolt size is determined by the size of the bolt (not the head) and the thread. You will need to get the correct thread pitch, diameter, length, and strength. You could call your local ...


1

It keeps your car's springs from bouncing up and down uncontrollably when you go over bumps. It looks like a bicycle pump and actually works in much the same way.


1

A shock absorber is a device that uses hydralic compression to absorb the impact when a car hits a bump or to help the car ride more smoothly.


1

It sounds like the mechanic is citing the maintenance schedule rather than a particular symptom. 74K miles is a good long way for a set of shocks and, while it's great that you aren't currently worried about their state, the vehicle will begin to suffer as they eventually fail. Here's a previous question that describes some of the rebounding that will ...


1

Dirt is a killer of shocks. Dirt on the cylinder ends up scoring the cylinders and getting into the seals, causing the effectiveness of the seal to drop. Then you get leaking and eventual failure. Keep the moving portions as clean as possible. On our airplanes (which don't have any dust boots), we clean the struts with hydraulic fluid and a cotton cloth ...


1

I got the nut off. Out of sheer frustration combined with late night stupidity I put the longest cheater bar on it and jacked up the end of the bar using a hydraulic jack. Surprisingly, it worked even though I was turning it in the wrong direction (that's the reason I hadn't tried that sooner). The nut un-seized and I was able to remove it relatively easily ...


1

I remember having issues like these about 5 years ago, and we ended up having to grip the screw/stud that was sticking out while turning the nut. Does the bolt have a flat piece that you can maybe get a wrench on? Try this if possible. Another option, assuming you are replacing them, vice grip the polished rod with some beefy vice grips and removed the nut. ...



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