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2

I don't have experience on as many different bikes as some people, but here's what I have found. But "preloading" the shifter, were talking about pressing on it just a little before you are ready to shift. The force needed from bike to bike will vary, so it's something you will just have to try and figure out. A motorcycle transmission is not like a ...


0

It sounds more like a transmission issue than a engine issue. It sounds like it not going to first gear but when you rev the engine it upshifts into second and drive normally. I could be a slipping clutch. In automatics there are pairs of clutches for each gear. When changing gears one clutch applies and other partially applies until it moves fast enough to ...


1

From my experience, it depends on a vehicle and driving conditions: - Toyota Corolla, driving for 8 years and never had a problem with tranny when shifting D-N-D often. Need to be careful when RPM doesn't match speed: for example N-D shift at 0 with high RPM (when need to move, switch to Drive is forgotten and gas is pressed), it may jolt or even break, or ...


5

Yes, there is an interlock between the ignition and the shifter, as well as an interlock between the shifter and the brake pedal. Something could have gotten messed up somewhere. There is a procedure to move the shifter, if stepping on the brake and the key system don't allow it. Check your owners guide. Generally there is a small removable plastic cover ...


3

The two could be related. In the US, the key can't be removed from the ignition unless the car is in Park as a safety requirement and most cars won't let you take it out of park until the key is inserted and turned. This is normally accomplished with a few switches and actuators in the ignition cylinder and the shift mechanism. This could be as simple as ...


7

I'm going to expand on rpmerf's answer, where he has disambiguated between Heel and toe and clutchless shifting. I'l briefly explain the driving technique only to better illustrate what it hopes to mechanically achieve. And so, please excuse me if get the nuance of the technique wrong. Here's an image of a gearbox. I couldn't find a one with synchromesh, ...


-1

This works for me great. Easy to follow. Part One https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I49uU65HMmM Part Two https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzHiuWpYb0M


0

What about the Clutch Master Cylinder? It worked for me on a Pt Cruiser after I replaced the clutch and a few sensors with no luck.


1

The specific answer to your question lies in the BSFC (Brake Specific Fuel Consumption) map for your engine, combined with the desired output. The BSFC map shows how efficiently the engine converts chemical energy to mechanical work at any given condition. Here is an example:



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