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31

Most of the time when you drive, you're putting a load (and causing wear) on what I'm going to call the "forward" face of each tooth on each gear in your drivetrain. The front of a tooth on the crankshaft pushes against the back of a tooth on the next gear in line, which pushes the next gear, etc. When you use "engine braking", all you are doing is ...


12

If you downshift into a gear at a RPM that is within the norm of driving then no, no harm done. When you downshift what is slowing you down is actually the compression stroke and is recommended over hard braking. Like another said, it is a bit of a mix of the two but engine braking is ok as long as the engine stays under redline, so do not go from 5th to ...


10

I'm a driver trainer/examiner and most of the time you rarely need heavy braking in traffic. If you drive calmly, allow plenty of distance between you and the vehicle in front (even at low speed)) and just take your foot of the accelerator early you avoid stopping and starting. If you let the car slow down and use the gear until it is no longer appropriate ...


9

Is it ok to give gas while releasing the clutch? Yes, but your goal is to give exactly the right amount of gas. The thing to remember is that the clutch is a consumable part (it's really a whole system of parts that can be consumed but let's pretend that it's a single unique piece for the sake of discussion). As such, it has a finite supply of work ...


8

Which would you rather change - your brake pads or your clutch? By downshifting to decelerate you are trading wear on your brake pads for wear on your clutch (among other things). Brake pads are much cheaper and easier to replace than a clutch. Personally, having done both, I'd rather do 50 brake jobs before I'd do one clutch job.


8

nope, not at all. I have a z06 vette and the engine has so much torque that I can easily go from 1st to 5th. Under normal driving I skip gears all the time. Generally transmissions don't really care about which gear you want to use next.


7

It all depends on your definition of high. In my car, the red line is at 7500 rpm, and that indicates that driving with the revs over this line for anything other than brief periods is expected to cause damage, either through overheating, increased wear, increased loading on bearings, lack of sufficient oil/fluid flow etc. When driving I have to keep my ...


7

The main purpose of neutral on an automatic is for towing or pushing the car. Obviously you can't push it with the transmission in park, and if you tow it with the transmission in gear or in park and the drive wheels are in contact with the ground, you'll ruin your transmission or your tires or both. I'm sure there are some other uses too, but they're ...


6

Donovan's is the only answer that has any truth in it. Downshifting and engine braking will have NO effect on the clutch, as you don't slip the clutch it doesn't wear out the engine, as you use the compression stroke and it is far better on tyres and handling as any advanced driving instructor would tell you. It is just more difficult, as you need to ...


6

You'll find the following will all affect your speed and acceleration: wind speed - a head wind will slow you down more than you would think your clothing - this directly impacts drag bike configuration - you'll go slower with panniers on than with them off weight - a full tank will mean you accelerate more slowly temperature - cooler air can give you a ...


6

First, let's start by listing some facts that we know about the brakes and the engine: The brakes in a car are designed to stop the vehicle, both in emergency situations as well as under normal driving conditions. The automatic transmission in modern automobiles is optimized to keep the engine running at speeds that balance fuel economy with engine output. ...


6

Assuming that you have no faults with your transmission, it doesn't matter - an automatic transmission will automatically switch down gear as and when it needs to. All the '2' gear does is not let you go over 2nd gear - which if you were heading downhill could make your engine over-rev...generally not recommended. So D should be just fine.


6

Think of it this way. If you need to brake so incredibly hard that you're worried the automatic transmission is getting in the way, you're better off worrying about things besides whether or not you're in neutral. You're probably about to crash or lose control, so train yourself to concentrate on steering, or making sure you're arms are out of the way of ...


6

For general driving, you can leave the car in drive. It doesn't damage the transmission leaving it in drive while stationary at the lights - although you don't want to be doing silly things like revving the engine while holding the brakes on. In an automatic car, you don't really use neutral. It is a step on the way to selecting Park, which means that the ...


6

It sounds like they're trying to take you for a ride to me. I can't see how driving style could cause the slave cylinder to fail - they're separated by a mechanical linkage. I would also dispute that anyone could destroy a clutch with 32k of normal driving - I'd expect it to last at least twice that long. However, a leaking cylinder might cause ...


5

When was the last time the transmission's gear oil was changed? If it has been a while (or never), get it changed. Check your manual for the recommended interval, this is one of the fluids that is often overlooked. If it has never been done on a 2003, it needs to be done.


5

Being in Neutral or Drive should have negligible to no effect on the distance the vehicle travels when the accelerator is not pressed because the torque converter disengages the engine below predetermined RPM levels. However, if you somehow were to push just a little too hard and sent the transmission into Reverse instead of stopping in Neutral, you would ...


5

A lot of newer cars are smart about shifting (they have electronic solenoids to control the hydraulics). I can put my 2001 Nissan Pathfinder in reverse at 50 MPH, and it's smart enough to not engage, it goes into neutral. However, at speeds below its cutoff point (I've done it at about 15 MPH and regretted it), you can put a lot of stress on the drivetrain ...


5

I'm assuming that the bike shifted better at a standstill before the rebuild, otherwise you wouldn't be asking...but nonetheless, many motorcycles are difficult to shift at a standstill, it has to do with the engagement of the "dogs" on the gears. When the bike is at a standstill, the output side of the transmission is also at a standstill, so the dogs ...


5

They will probably work out to be the same. An automatic transmission is inherently more complicated which means more can go wrong and usually does (more so than manuals). The increased complexity also makes them more expensive, heavier, less fuel efficient etc. A manual transmission is less complicated which means there is less that can go wrong. Through ...


4

The only real rule is that you have to keep the tach between the idle speed (usually ~500 RPM) and the redline (probably around 10000 for a bike). In practice you'll usually want to find the band where the engine feels most comfortable. This is based more on sound and feel than anything. If the bike lurches or nearly stalls as you're letting the clutch out, ...


4

putting brakes on while waiting on a red light while your gear is in D can damage the braking system? In general, no, you're fine. I think you've conflated several issues that can lead to issues (if not actual problems): If you were sitting at a light in drive (D) with your left foot on the brakes hard and your right foot flooring the ...


4

The clutch is there for a reason. It's true that some drivers, with some cars, can shift a manual transmission smoothly without it, and it's a useful skill to have in an emergency (if the clutch fails such that it's always engaged, and you can keep from having to stop the car, you can keep driving). However, when you do this the synchronization gears ...


3

I don't think the Neutral Safety Switch can jam a transmission, but the throw out bearing in the clutch can do this. I doubt it would be a sychro, but you never know. How many miles on the car/clutch?


3

I think you need to define your terms. Efficiency could mean at least four things in this context: Least fuel consumed per hour. Most mileage covered per unit of fuel. Most kinetic energy created per unit of fuel consumed. Most acceleration created per second. These four choices often destructively interfere with each other. Hitting some of the high ...


3

I am not a driving expert, but I think it has to do with RPM. If you want to skip gears, make sure the RPM are at the right level or you damage your gears. Again, I am no expert, but I think it is related to RPMs.


3

Within a certain range, of course more RPMs mean more wear. Especially if your maintenance is based on time or miles. Consider a bearing that has a lifetime of 1,000,000 revolutions. If you drive at 5,000 RPM, that bearing is going to use up its lifetime twice as fast as if you were driving at 2,500 RPM. On the other hand, "lugging" an engine at too low an ...


3

NEVER, EVER go into neutral while slowing down to a stop, for 3 reasons: 1. You lose the added benefit of engine braking if the car's not in gear 2. If you have to quickly avoid something by accelerating and moving out of the way, you'll hit the gas and won't go anywhere 3. If the light turns green before you come to a complete stop, you'd have to go back ...


3

If you're carrying a high load, L is best. The gears work as follows: D = use whichever gear the computer decides/ Useful for everyday driving. 2 = use first or second, depending on speed. Useful when carrying high loads at low speeds. L = stay in the lowest gear. Best for carrying high loads up steep inclines.


3

In the automatics I've been in where people do that, it's a rather dramatic bang/clunk if shifted from Reverse to Drive while still rolling backwards. I hate riding with people that do that, makes me cringe everytime. I hear newer cars are smarter about it, but it still sounds like a bad idea. I hate to risk my transmission on a sensor that might fail ...



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