Hot answers tagged

35

Engine oil does much more for an engine than lubricate. It provides cooling, cleaning, and a bunch of other chores. You already know engine function is degraded when you run out of oil. Let's see if we can run it down to make more sense for you how it happens. Let's say, for lack of argument, your engine is running with very little to no oil. The engine ...


11

In most engines, when you fill the oil, it drains into a reservoir on the bottom of the engine known as the oil pan. The tube for the dipstick goes right down into this reservoir to measure the level of the oil. The other important item located in this reservoir is the pick-up tube for the oil pump. As long as the pick-up tube for the pump stays under the ...


6

I can't disagree with mikes's answer, but I'd like to suggest an even stronger view: assuming that this is a car you'd like to keep for a while, treat it as if no service has ever been done. The age and mileage will then dictate what you need to check out. Find a list of regular car maintenance items (in your repair manual if you have one, or online), and go ...


5

With way too much engine oil in the engine, the problem is that the crankshaft can hit the oil in the bottom of the crankcase when the engine is running. Since the crankshaft is spinning fast, even at idle, each time it slaps the surface of the oil, it will create some bubbles in the oil as the air just behind the spinning crankshaft lobe gets dragged under ...


5

Disclaimer: I work with an older 202 straight 6 Holden engine in a landrover, so my perspective is somewhat vintage. However the basic underlying concepts are the same. Cause: Low oil in the oil pan, at the very bottom of the engine. Normally the oil should read right on the Full line on a dipstick, when the vehicle is level and the motor is cold and has ...


5

The first thing I recommend is to not get a state required inspection sticker (if needed) from the seller. Many dealers will include it in the price or have a station that they use. You want an independent check of the emission status and safety. I always do an oil and filter change. Even if the oil looks clean, you have no idea if it is the right type, ...


5

This is not normal behavior of a typical mechanic. Most mechanics/shops will still continue to charge their normal hourly rate no matter if you bring in the parts or if they get you the parts. The only difference is, they will not warrant the parts you bring in. You may want to look at the fine print of why they are charging the extra $15/hr. If the reason ...


4

Mechanics make money off of the parts they buy for you. Look for a small shop with 1-4 mechanics. They like business even if it's not the most profitable. They are about building a relationship with their customer. If you're cool and your mechanic is cool, they'll install just about anything that's legal for their regular rate. Keep going back to that ...


4

This is all explained on the Government website for the MOT. The leaflets are kept up to date at legislation changes. Whether an individual test centre will fix minor faults like tyre pressure is down to the centre.


4

I can answer this because it has happened to me a few times. There are several different possibilities depending on the ambient temperature and how old the engine is. Here are three real scenarios that have happened with my 1996 Volvo 850: (1) When the oil gets low the first thing you might notice is more noise. Oil muffles the engine, so when oil gets low ...


3

The entire lubrication system for the engine fails, leading to scratching of the cylinders and the barrels, after which point they dont run smoothly and degrade much faster. the pistons are made of aluminium and the cylinders have a special tough glassy coating so they screatch very easily and when the engine is too hot the aluminium deforms and heats in a ...


3

It sounds to me as though they didn't put (enough) oil back in after the engine flush. First of all, it didn't need an engine flush. Mobil1 and other synthetics are renowned for not leaving deposits in the engine. I would bet your engine would have been sparkling clean on the inside. They sold you something you didn't need. (I'm betting something along the ...


3

If an engine is that full, it will pump oil through the PCV system into the intake manifold. Piston rings, even in a fresh engine, always have at least a minimal amount of blow-by from combustion. Normally these combustion products pressurize the crankcase slightly and then vent through the PCV (Positive Crankcase Ventilation) system into the intake. ...


3

Motorcycle Maintenance Tasks These tasks occur differently based upon the requirements of each manufacturer, find out what the intervals are for particular make/model/year. Cable lubrication - A graphite based lubricant, no oil based lubricants as they tend to have the hydrocarbons evaporate under heat and leave a sticky gummy feel to the cable and it's ...


3

The MOT only checks a specific set of things, as described in the link in Chenmunka's answer. Tyre pressure isn't one of them, but tyre condition and tread depth are. Some MOT stations (usually the smaller ones) will fix minor things as they go, big ones won't as they can charge you extra to do things afterwards! However - it is your responsibility (by law) ...


3

I'm not sure that you can purchase one from the manufacturer, but you can purchase them from Helminc.com without issue for many brands (but mostly American). I purchased two different ones from here, one each for 93 & 94 Camaro (also covers Firebird/Trans Ams). These are the exact ones used by dealership service mechanics. Some are hard copy, while I ...


2

This is specific to the make of your vehicle. For instance, you can purchase many tools and service manuals from manufacturers such as Chrysler and Hyundai/Kia, BUT you may not be so lucky when it comes different dealers such as Toyota or many GM vehicles. If you provided your specific make and model, I would better be able to answer this question. As the ...


2

The garage should contact you before doing any work over and above that which you had already agreed. This page from the AA might help you: http://www.theaa.com/motoring_advice/legal-advice/garage-bill-too-much.html If you authorise a garage to carry out only specific work, and to do no other work without further permission, then the garage is not ...


2

In the circumstance you describe, any work that is not included in a standard service and is going to be charged should first be agreed with the customer. Thankfully, the laws regarding consumer rights in the UK changed yesterday so should afford you some protection as they include services (i.e. work which is purely labor). Surely the morally correct ...


2

My list would not include: Fuel injection cleaner; use Top Tier certified fuel instead. Engine Coolant, too early for the new, better coolant chemistry. Throttle body clean, needed only if symptoms develop. The transmission fluid change interval sparks a debate in the repair industry. I err on the side of caution and change it every 30k miles with OEM fluid. ...


2

The engine will likely seize up. This happened to me with a lawnmower once. I tried to mow the lawn after dad drained the oil, but before he filled it. It ran for a few minutes, then stopped as if the blade had hit something hard, but without the sound of the blade hitting something. We got very lucky, and were able to start it up after adding oil and ...


2

If you bought the car new, I would highly recommend following the service schedule while you are still under warranty. Furthermore, you will likely void the warranty if you don't have the services performed at the specified intervals. If the services are free, you should definitely do them, they will extend the life of your vehicle at no cost to you. If ...


1

The real answer is- it depends. An extra couple of quarts? Probably no real effect. If you put in enough that the crank is sloshing the oil around, you probably will get a foam of oil all around the underside of the pistons, but besides robbing a bunch of horsepower due to windage and maybe causing some oil burning issues (at a certain point your oil rings ...


1

Gap between cylinder and engine core is really really small. This gap is filled with oil under normal circumstances, allowing cylinder to "slide" in its container. When you run out of oil, friction between cylinder and its container increases a lot, causing high wear. When car runs without oil, friction between cylinder and its container generates a lot of ...


1

It's not good. The little oil you have left will overheat & degrade as others have explained better. With your oil level really low like that, as long as the engine isn't overheating yet, you might be able to get the car to lug itself 5 or 10 miles to a shop to get more oil w/out problems, but it's already really pretty harsh on the car Basically, your ...


1

Without oil to lubricate, metal on metal surfaces begin to heat up from friction. The extra heat causes the metal to expand. When it expands enough, some part of the engine will try to stop moving, but the other parts may not stop yet because of momentum or power, causing bends and breaks of internal engine parts. When oil is too low, the oil pump might ...


1

Most shops will charge their normal hourly rate. But its not uncommon to see mechanics try to charge you something extra (whether flat fee or more houyrly) based on you bringing your own parts. When you hear people or mechanics say "we will not warranty it", its not completely true. I heard from a more legitimate mechanic that it is by law that all mechanic ...


1

For anyone else reading this, an "engine flush" can be done by draining the old oil, filling up with new oil, going for a quick 100 mile drive, then draining and refilling again. It's not quite as thorough as a chemical flush, but it doesn't destroy the motor either.


1

An MOT in the UK will test these things. For more details on how they test your car, see here. Your car will either get a pass or a fail for each one. If get a fail in any one of the categories, that will constitute a fail overall. They are not required to do any work on the car, not even adjust the tire pressure or replace a bulb. Some might be kind to ...


1

My 2006 TK (bought new) has 205,000 Ks, runs beautifully, never been to a shop only serviced by me , best oils and filters at short intervals, no timing belt change yet, and not until 250,000Ks and then again at 500,000Ks.



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