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9

In general, at the very minimum, you will want to check air pressure in tires, and all fluid levels and ensure that they are at the proper levels. Also, checking the condition of the oil and possibly changing it if it is needed (on a trip that long, probably wouldn't hurt to go ahead and do that if it over halfway till the next one anyways). If staying ...


5

I think the canonical answer to this question is probably a Honda Civic, anything up to late 90s. My reasons for this recommendation are: The parts are widely available and cheap. There's an abundance of online information about doing repairs and maintenance. The engine is 4-cylinder inline and everything on the engine that needs regular service is easily ...


3

Belts. You should carry spare belts in the trunk anyway. Hoses. Some people carry spare radiator hoses. Brakes. Unless you don't plan on stopping on your trip. Battery. Clean crud off terminals and be sure the battery is decent enough to start the car at some rest area in the middle of nowhere at 3am. Check voltage to ensure alternator is functioning ...


3

Try to get something that is rear wheel drive, a forward facing engine and transmission is simpler and easier to work on then a trans-axle plus it gives you more room to work. Look for something you see a lot of so that the parts and knowledge is easy to acquire, but also get something that you actually want to drive. Older two door pickups work rather well. ...


3

I don't know that car specifically, but in general, Holdens have their timing belt (and waterpump) replaced every 75000km to 120000km. But open your car's service booklet. It should tell you the service schedules and what you need to do at each interval. Usually all of them will suggest at least inspecting belts for wear. Keep in mind that a broken timing ...


3

This is a bit of a localised question, but as you mention French cars I'm going to assume you're in Europe. Generally, the simpler a car is, the easier it is to fix, and older cars tend to be simpler than newer ones (less electronics, which you can't generally fix yourself). 70s cars tend to be pretty much all mechanical, 80s cars start to introduce basic ...


3

Look in the owner's manual for maintenance and service schedules. If you don't have the manual go here: http://www.toyota.com/owners/web/pages/resources/owners-manuals put in your car and check out the manual. Also you can go here: http://smg.toyotapartsandservice.com/guides.php and put in your car, year and which mileage you are currently at and it will ...


2

It depends one several factors--type of engine, how far you ride, the climate, how aggressively you ride, type/quality of gas/oil you use, and maintenance history (and other things, I'm not thinking of). For example, I live in a 4-season climate, and put my bike into storage for about half the year. So, in March (optimistic) I uncover my bike, put air in ...


2

tl;dr: The stabilizer works with the swaybar to reduce body roll in turns. The stabilizer in the picture is missing a nut on the top bolt. The picture in the question clearly illustrates the function of the stabilizer (if you know what it's connected to) and what some of the failure modes might be. Here is a picture of some of the critical components ...


1

Since I don't know exactly where this piece goes in the front end of your car, I will give you some generalities of why this piece is built as it is and why it probably needed to be changed. The front end of your car has a lot of things going on. Way back when, vehicle front suspensions were setup with a straight axle, somewhat like what rear-ends are setup ...



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