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3

Disclaimer: I've never done this practically. This answer is based on my somewhat limited exposure to turbomachinery theory in automotive applications. It's all about the flow Unlike fixed-geometry turbos, in which the vanes provide optimal efficiency for a single flow, vane angles are adjusted in variable-geometry turbos to enhance efficiency across a ...


5

Dodge installed VNT Turbochargers on cars in 89 and 90. The most well known of which is the 1989 Shelby CSX-VNT. The vanes were controlled by a dual port vacuum actuator. There was nothing electronic on the turbo itself, but there were vacuum solenoids (for boost control) on the lines going to the actuator. The VNT Turbo has movable vanes on the exhaust ...


2

A small portion of exhaust gas is sent back to the intake to improve emissions via the EGR hose. If your vehicle is running rich, some fuel will be left unburnt in the exhaust gases. This can explain the wet fuel that you are seeing on the MAP sensor. Unfortunately, this is an indication of bigger engine operability problems. It doesn't surprise me that ...


8

When I looked online, here's what I found about the location of the MAP sensor in your car. As always, a picture is worth a thousand words: From looking at other info about that car it's port injected, not throttle body injected (individual injectors on each cylinder, not just one on the throttle body). As far as I know there should never be fuel in that ...


8

Figured out it (thanks to a shove in the right direction by @mikes): It's the remote engine start accessory's antenna. I didn't think of it when I was asked if I had "add-ons" because it's an official Honda accessory (that I can't do without!) installed by the dealer before taking delivery. Specifically, see this exploded diagram part #4: I went back ...



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