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It sounds like you just don't know the characteristics of the output of the fuel level sender in the vehicle--perhaps learning more about that sensor would solve your problem. In terms of an alternate solution that does not use the fuel level sender, if the vehicle is a modern one with electronic fuel injection, then it is possible to determine the ...


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I'm a little concerned by the proposed fixes. While I don't know the specifics of your Merc, I find it odd that the timing chain would be responsible for fuel trim codes. The ECU swap seems to be a concerted attempt at what I like to call 'parts roulette': possible, but not probable. If you have codes for fuel trims and misfires, the principal components ...


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1) Since my ABS light isn't on on my dash, can I safely assume that it's fine as-is, or is this something that will likely come back to bite me later on? Yes. If the sensor was not picking up the signal, you won't see it at first (after the self diagnostics are done, that is). Once you start driving, the computer will notice the differential and then ...


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I would think you should be able to if there is a terminal for the wire to attach to. If the terminal has broke off at the base of the sensor, then it probably won't work. I would use a soldering iron, versus open flame type of iron to ensure the heat is more localized. If you are worried about the sensor not working due to the heat, I don't think I would ...


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As Brian alluded to in his comment, in most cases it will not work. You have to have a reader which will read OBD-I. Some readers, like the Innova 3140 will read both, and comes with all of the adapters to attach to the "older" vehicles. Brian also stated about the change to OBD-II. In the US it was mandated to change over in '96. Some manufactures changed ...


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The info I have found under the federal emissions warranty says it is covered for 8 years or 80,000 miles. If you have had all the service work done at the dealer I would complain to the dealer, the Nissan area rep. and anyone else who will listen. The next thing I would do is get a second opinion. Find out why it failed so it doesn't happen again. Check ...


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It is possible to read data from most vehicles' OBD port using a relatively cheap Bluetooth OBD adapter and some client software. Some GPS units have bluetooth, or you could opt for a USB-style OBD plug. This would also allow you to read things like engine load, temperature, rpm, etc. Wikipedia entry OBD Software OBD2 bluetooth adapter


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I'd also go with calibrating the existing sensor, but I'd do it the other way around to mac. Start with an empty tank and measure the voltage. add a known volume of fuel, measureagain. repeat until the tank is full. This will give you a series of reference points, and obviously the smaller the volume you add each time, the better the resolution of your ...



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