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14

While i'm not sure if there are mechanical tachometers like speedometers electronic tachometers are quite simple. An electronic tachometer works like an old analog volt meter. The speed of the engine is converted to a voltage. The voltage is fed to the moving coil. The coil creates a magnetic field. That field of the coil tries to align itself with the ...


8

Here's a rough approach that should work regardless of vehicle You will need to know the current brake pad thickness the thickness of a brand new brake pad how much mileage you've put on the car since the last brake pad change. The formula Mileage per mm = mileage since last brake change / ( brand new thickness - present thickness ) ...


8

Figured out it (thanks to a shove in the right direction by @mikes): It's the remote engine start accessory's antenna. I didn't think of it when I was asked if I had "add-ons" because it's an official Honda accessory (that I can't do without!) installed by the dealer before taking delivery. Specifically, see this exploded diagram part #4: I went back ...


8

When I looked online, here's what I found about the location of the MAP sensor in your car. As always, a picture is worth a thousand words: From looking at other info about that car it's port injected, not throttle body injected (individual injectors on each cylinder, not just one on the throttle body). As far as I know there should never be fuel in that ...


7

It might seem easy to integrate a sensor that detects the opening/closing of a mechanical thermostat's pintle (LVDT, for example) but here are some challenges which would need to be addressed: Cost vs Benefit Is a "smart" thermostat really worth the extra hassle and money when its dumb counterpart has the following to offer? : it's already ...


6

There is a distinction that needs to be made between: OBD: this is an interface, that specifies the physical and electrical parameters required to connect a diagnostic computer and the car's electronics in a standard way. This is the bit that is mandatory by legal requirement, so that a car manufacturer cannot "lock in" its vehicles by requiring service to ...


6

You need Spark, Fuel, and Compression for an engine to run. Since this engine was just reassembled, there is a lot to question. Spark - rotor position - beware of caps where the points are not "straight through" plug wires in the correct position timing - may need play with it a bit coil - ensure it is firing spark plug firing - use a jumper to connect ...


6

The basic answer to your question is: Yes To be more specific, I cannot tell you if it will work or not. It appears you already have the specific dash version you want. What you can do is install it and see if it will work. What is the worst which can happen? If you are not modifying anything to fit the different gauge cluster, all you have to do is ...


5

Dodge installed VNT Turbochargers on cars in 89 and 90. The most well known of which is the 1989 Shelby CSX-VNT. The vanes were controlled by a dual port vacuum actuator. There was nothing electronic on the turbo itself, but there were vacuum solenoids (for boost control) on the lines going to the actuator. The VNT Turbo has movable vanes on the exhaust ...


4

The thermostat would have been my first guess too. It doesn't need a sealing ring, the housing will slightly clamp it when you put it back together. It is entirely possible that the temperature sensor has 'drifted' and is reading lower than the genuine temperature. I have experienced this more than once in my own cars. It's worth as try as they're usually ...


4

Yes, you can put them in the front bumper. You'll need to drill them in - just like the back bumper. I would recommend having a cut off switch for the front sensors somewhere in the cabin, otherwise the beeping would be very annoying. Rear sensors are (usually) powered by the reversing lamp's wiring, so in the front you won't have this... so a cut off ...


3

The two requirements are separate. OBDII is required in all vehicles since 1996. This is primarily an emissions related regulation to formalize how vehicles would relay emissions failures to the user and to mechanics. The standard has many parts, but it primarily designated a connector, its pinout, and allowed one of five different electrical signalling ...


3

Disclaimer: I've never done this practically. This answer is based on my somewhat limited exposure to turbomachinery theory in automotive applications. It's all about the flow Unlike fixed-geometry turbos, in which the vanes provide optimal efficiency for a single flow, vane angles are adjusted in variable-geometry turbos to enhance efficiency across a ...


2

Since you said the reverse lights are still working, it's not the reverse switch. This switch signals to the engine computer if you are in a gear or neutral. The computer uses this switch to determine several things, including how to handle engine deceleration during shifting and the idle feedback loop. With 1 wire broken, the computer only ever sees this ...


2

I don't think CAN is a necessary part of OBD, it's just the most commonly used system. The OBD requirements are for consistent diagnostics (so that, in theory, any car can be plugged into a standard reader and give a standard set of error codes), wheras CAN is a method for the internal components of the car to communicate (similar in many ways to the USB ...


2

None of this is true. In the same way as there was an EU Directive that all cars be equipped with ABS but TVR didn't subscribe to this. My uncle has just sold a 2005 Caterham Se7en CSR-200 which used MBE management and was definitely not CAN-BUS. We're building another one in October of this year and if it genuinely is CAN-BUS I'll let you know but I have ...


2

How is the OBD and CAN exactly related? Controller Area Network (CAN) is ISO 11898 standard. It, like most other networks, is based off of the OSI model. It specifies certain parameters for communications between vehicle systems. CAN was first specified in 1986 by Robert Bosch at the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) congress. CAN uses serial ...


2

OBD is a standard for a diagnostics port that provides emissions-related info on the diagnostics port. Contrary to popular belief its purpose isn't to prevent lock-in by car manufacturers but only to allow service centers a standard way to access emissions-related info required for mandatory checks like the "MOT test" (as they call it in the UK). The ...


2

It is more than likely not the sensor. The problem lies in the circuit which goes to the sensor. Replacing the sensor is probably the last thing I'd do in this case. In this case, I believe it is only a single wire you'd need to trace. It could also be the connector/connection at the sensor itself. In either case, it looks as though the intake manifold ...


2

In a word? Nothing. I mean, a 4-wire O2 is going to be about the same no matter what it's made for. The connector may be different, but the guts are going to be pretty much the same. Unfortunately, you really need to know what works well with your vehicle. For instance, Bosch (from my understanding) originated the O2 sensor. Their product should be above ...


2

shows that a Citigo Elegance 75PS Greentech with 185/55 x 15" requires 26psi on its small/narrow tyres. You can go for the cheap option by searching for 26psi valve indicator caps which will allow you to visually inspect each tyre without having to get a pressure monitor to check them. Some aftermarket tyre pressure monitoring tools (such as this one) ...


2

The key to understanding this system is that the signal to the gauge unit comes from the PCM not the temp sensor. Testing is done at the connector at the PCM. Disconnect the “C” connector. Ground the C24 wire Y/G, turn the power on, Leave the ground connected for no more than 30 seconds. The gauge should move to Hot. If it does the gauge and wiring is ...


2

The fact that the coolant temp is lower than the thermostat set point indicates that the thermostat isn't doing what it's supposed to do. Since you have verified that the thermostat fine by testing it in boiling water, the only logical explanation is that coolant flow is (at least partially) bypassing the thermostat. That thermostat gasket is essential in ...


2

I suspect that the sensors were detecting the loose paint as an object very close. You should be able to re-paint them, but I don't know if they would need a special sort of paint - it might be worth checking with Ford


2

Engines need 4 things to run- spark (at the right time), air, fuel, and compression. A lot of things can conspire to deny some of those things. Don't just start shotgunning parts, that gets expensive real fast. Take a few moments to do diagnostics first. Once you find the category of problem, you've eliminated 3/4 of the possibilities, and tracking it down ...


2

The Vehicle Speed Sensor sends signal to the Instrument Cluster. You can check pin 2 (blue/white) on the B connector for signal from the VSS. If there is signal you need a new cluster. If not you have to check continuity between the cluster and VSS


2

A small portion of exhaust gas is sent back to the intake to improve emissions via the EGR hose. If your vehicle is running rich, some fuel will be left unburnt in the exhaust gases. This can explain the wet fuel that you are seeing on the MAP sensor. Unfortunately, this is an indication of bigger engine operability problems. It doesn't surprise me that ...


2

This will not likely work. If the sensor is not the correct part number for the specific vehicle it is unlikely that it will match the exacting electrical specifications needed for the PCM to control and read the sensor. AFR sensors are matched to the PCM. Unlike so called "oxygen sensor" which can more often be interchanged across different engines and ...


1

It's certainly worth checking the ignition timing - one obvious possibility (though I'm sure you've checked this) is that the timing is 180 degrees out, so it's firing at the end of the exhaust stroke instead of the compression stroke. Otherwise, have you done a compression test since reassembling? I doubt there would be any problems there, but might be ...


1

The other answers have covered most things, but here are two points that haven't yet been mentioned. Warranty This is usually a function of the supplier rather than the manufacturer, but some places offer a lifetime guarantee. Others offer none. Physical fit How hard could it possibly be to make accurate threads? Apparently pretty hard for some ...



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