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7

It might seem easy to integrate a sensor that detects the opening/closing of a mechanical thermostat's pintle (LVDT, for example) but here are some challenges which would need to be addressed: Cost vs Benefit Is a "smart" thermostat really worth the extra hassle and money when its dumb counterpart has the following to offer? : it's already ...


7

While i'm not sure if there are mechanical tachometers like speedometers electronic tachometers are quite simple. An electronic tachometer works like an old analog volt meter. The speed of the engine is converted to a voltage. The voltage is fed to the moving coil. The coil creates a magnetic field. That field of the coil tries to align itself with the ...


6

You need Spark, Fuel, and Compression for an engine to run. Since this engine was just reassembled, there is a lot to question. Spark - rotor position - beware of caps where the points are not "straight through" plug wires in the correct position timing - may need play with it a bit coil - ensure it is firing spark plug firing - use a jumper to connect ...


5

There is a distinction that needs to be made between: OBD: this is an interface, that specifies the physical and electrical parameters required to connect a diagnostic computer and the car's electronics in a standard way. This is the bit that is mandatory by legal requirement, so that a car manufacturer cannot "lock in" its vehicles by requiring service to ...


4

Yes, you can put them in the front bumper. You'll need to drill them in - just like the back bumper. I would recommend having a cut off switch for the front sensors somewhere in the cabin, otherwise the beeping would be very annoying. Rear sensors are (usually) powered by the reversing lamp's wiring, so in the front you won't have this... so a cut off ...


3

OK, so it seems like the IAT on this model is integrated with the MAF:


3

The thermostat would have been my first guess too. It doesn't need a sealing ring, the housing will slightly clamp it when you put it back together. It is entirely possible that the temperature sensor has 'drifted' and is reading lower than the genuine temperature. I have experienced this more than once in my own cars. It's worth as try as they're usually ...


2

I suspect that the sensors were detecting the loose paint as an object very close. You should be able to re-paint them, but I don't know if they would need a special sort of paint - it might be worth checking with Ford


2

Disconnect the battery terminals. Unplug srs fuses if any exists in your fuse box. Unplug the steering wheel airbag its a yellow wire under steering column with a warning label. Unplug the dashboard air bag if you have one. It's a yellow wire under the dash. Same warning label on the passenger side. Replace your sensor Put your fuses back and connect ...


2

Since you said the reverse lights are still working, it's not the reverse switch. This switch signals to the engine computer if you are in a gear or neutral. The computer uses this switch to determine several things, including how to handle engine deceleration during shifting and the idle feedback loop. With 1 wire broken, the computer only ever sees this ...


2

I don't think CAN is a necessary part of OBD, it's just the most commonly used system. The OBD requirements are for consistent diagnostics (so that, in theory, any car can be plugged into a standard reader and give a standard set of error codes), wheras CAN is a method for the internal components of the car to communicate (similar in many ways to the USB ...


2

None of this is true. In the same way as there was an EU Directive that all cars be equipped with ABS but TVR didn't subscribe to this. My uncle has just sold a 2005 Caterham Se7en CSR-200 which used MBE management and was definitely not CAN-BUS. We're building another one in October of this year and if it genuinely is CAN-BUS I'll let you know but I have ...


2

OBD is a standard for a diagnostics port that provides emissions-related info on the diagnostics port. Contrary to popular belief its purpose isn't to prevent lock-in by car manufacturers but only to allow service centers a standard way to access emissions-related info required for mandatory checks like the "MOT test" (as they call it in the UK). The ...


2

The two requirements are separate. OBDII is required in all vehicles since 1996. This is primarily an emissions related regulation to formalize how vehicles would relay emissions failures to the user and to mechanics. The standard has many parts, but it primarily designated a connector, its pinout, and allowed one of five different electrical signalling ...


2

How is the OBD and CAN exactly related? Controller Area Network (CAN) is ISO 11898 standard. It, like most other networks, is based off of the OSI model. It specifies certain parameters for communications between vehicle systems. CAN was first specified in 1986 by Robert Bosch at the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) congress. CAN uses serial ...


2

In a word? Nothing. I mean, a 4-wire O2 is going to be about the same no matter what it's made for. The connector may be different, but the guts are going to be pretty much the same. Unfortunately, you really need to know what works well with your vehicle. For instance, Bosch (from my understanding) originated the O2 sensor. Their product should be above ...


2

shows that a Citigo Elegance 75PS Greentech with 185/55 x 15" requires 26psi on its small/narrow tyres. You can go for the cheap option by searching for 26psi valve indicator caps which will allow you to visually inspect each tyre without having to get a pressure monitor to check them. Some aftermarket tyre pressure monitoring tools (such as this one) ...


2

The key to understanding this system is that the signal to the gauge unit comes from the PCM not the temp sensor. Testing is done at the connector at the PCM. Disconnect the “C” connector. Ground the C24 wire Y/G, turn the power on, Leave the ground connected for no more than 30 seconds. The gauge should move to Hot. If it does the gauge and wiring is ...


2

It is more than likely not the sensor. The problem lies in the circuit which goes to the sensor. Replacing the sensor is probably the last thing I'd do in this case. In this case, I believe it is only a single wire you'd need to trace. It could also be the connector/connection at the sensor itself. In either case, it looks as though the intake manifold ...


2

Engines need 4 things to run- spark (at the right time), air, fuel, and compression. A lot of things can conspire to deny some of those things. Don't just start shotgunning parts, that gets expensive real fast. Take a few moments to do diagnostics first. Once you find the category of problem, you've eliminated 3/4 of the possibilities, and tracking it down ...


1

The other answers have covered most things, but here are two points that haven't yet been mentioned. Warranty This is usually a function of the supplier rather than the manufacturer, but some places offer a lifetime guarantee. Others offer none. Physical fit How hard could it possibly be to make accurate threads? Apparently pretty hard for some ...


1

In general what do the more expensive sensors have that the cheaper ones don't? There is no functional difference; all 4-wire zirconia-based narrowbands should exhibit the following: useful voltage range 0.1 - 0.9 V stoichiometric AFR at 0.45 V low voltage = lean condition, high voltage = rich condition Certain brands may have a quicker warm-up time ...


1

I had very similar symptoms on a BMW, the sensor itself was faulty and the problem was solved by replacing it. There are two ways of diagnosing this that I can think of: Look at the sensor readings in the live data section of a diagnostics tool If you don't have access to such a tool, buy one new sensor and fit it to each position one by one until the ...


1

If you are going back to the same source for the sensor, it could be there was a bad production run of the sensor: it could be a manufacturing defect. Try a different source for the sensor and see if it doesn't cure the problem. I agree this is a really strange issue. I have never seen where a single sensor would fail repeatedly. IMHO, it still boils down ...


1

A better way to handle this is to pull direct power from a fuse (or direct battery power with inline fuse or fusible link) and run it through a relay. Connect a power lead from the reverse lights to power the relay. When the lights come on, the reverse camera will be powered by battery power. The relay draws very little power and should not cause your ...


1

As per your question the issue is about overheating. For that we already have a coolant temperature sensor, which can alert the driver when there is over heating. For your kind information there are electrically controlled thermostats in some modern engines of Mercedes and maybe in some others too!!!


1

I assume that by "air filter sensor" you're referring to the Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor. If cleaning it helped temporarily, this is usually a sign that the sensor is on its way out and needs to be replaced. There is one test that you might be able to perform to corroborate that it is in need of replacement. Some vehicles are able to run in a fallback mode ...


1

If your engine is the ABA engine, it's located in the distributor. You have to disassemble the distributor in order to get it out. For the money, they suggest it's a good time to replace the entire distributor. (NOTE: I'm not promoting that site ... please do your research and get what is right for you. Please notice what is said on the line for the sensor, ...


1

In general, for all the temperature sensors (just a simple thermistors, i.e. resistors changing value according with the temperature): If indication is: - Large Value, e.g. -40, the sensor is not connected and the circuit is open. If indication is: + Large Value, .e.g. +40, there is short circuit. Note: even when you connect the sensor and correct the ...



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