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11

While i'm not sure if there are mechanical tachometers like speedometers electronic tachometers are quite simple. An electronic tachometer works like an old analog volt meter. The speed of the engine is converted to a voltage. The voltage is fed to the moving coil. The coil creates a magnetic field. That field of the coil tries to align itself with the ...


7

Many new cars do in have "a sensor system that constantly monitors oil viscosity, conductivity, temperature and electrical parameters." See here: http://www.sensorland.com/AppPage064.html GM for example has been incorporating these into its Camaros, the Lambda platform, various Buicks, and more. Here is another link that might prove helpful to you: ...


7

It might seem easy to integrate a sensor that detects the opening/closing of a mechanical thermostat's pintle (LVDT, for example) but here are some challenges which would need to be addressed: Cost vs Benefit Is a "smart" thermostat really worth the extra hassle and money when its dumb counterpart has the following to offer? : it's already ...


6

You need Spark, Fuel, and Compression for an engine to run. Since this engine was just reassembled, there is a lot to question. Spark - rotor position - beware of caps where the points are not "straight through" plug wires in the correct position timing - may need play with it a bit coil - ensure it is firing spark plug firing - use a jumper to connect ...


5

This is a very common failure in the Nissan's. The part number on the 2001/2002 Model Year MAF Sensor was 22680-6N200. This part has been known for a very high failure rate. It was later superceeded by part numbers 22680-6N201 and 22680-AM600. One of these two parts should be the one that you are ordering for the vehicle. If in any case these are not ...


5

There is a distinction that needs to be made between: OBD: this is an interface, that specifies the physical and electrical parameters required to connect a diagnostic computer and the car's electronics in a standard way. This is the bit that is mandatory by legal requirement, so that a car manufacturer cannot "lock in" its vehicles by requiring service to ...


4

The first O2 sensor is the one that the ECU uses to set the fuel-air mixture. If you had a problem with your first O2 sensor, the car would not run at its best. This error is on the second O2 sensor, sometimes called the "tattletail" sensor. On your Jetta, the second sensor is basically responsible only for turning on the "check engine" light if the ...


4

It's just in front of the front passenger side door, under the dashboard. It might be stuck down behind the carpet a ways.


4

Yes, you can put them in the front bumper. You'll need to drill them in - just like the back bumper. I would recommend having a cut off switch for the front sensors somewhere in the cabin, otherwise the beeping would be very annoying. Rear sensors are (usually) powered by the reversing lamp's wiring, so in the front you won't have this... so a cut off ...


4

The thermostat would have been my first guess too. It doesn't need a sealing ring, the housing will slightly clamp it when you put it back together. It is entirely possible that the temperature sensor has 'drifted' and is reading lower than the genuine temperature. I have experienced this more than once in my own cars. It's worth as try as they're usually ...


3

After much Googling and trying to interpret vague descriptions on internet forums, I have discovered that this is apparently the ambient temperature sensor, used to display the outside temperature on the center console. It is normally mounted in front of the radiator, in the center-ish of the front grill with a plastic clip. Unless someone has some ...


3

I'd also go with calibrating the existing sensor, but I'd do it the other way around to mac. Start with an empty tank and measure the voltage. add a known volume of fuel, measureagain. repeat until the tank is full. This will give you a series of reference points, and obviously the smaller the volume you add each time, the better the resolution of your ...


3

It sounds like you just don't know the characteristics of the output of the fuel level sender in the vehicle--perhaps learning more about that sensor would solve your problem. In terms of an alternate solution that does not use the fuel level sender, if the vehicle is a modern one with electronic fuel injection, then it is possible to determine the ...


3

A quick way to check your O2 sensor, is to record all the codes (On paper, or whatever) and swap the sensors. If the code goes to bank 2, than you know you need a sensor. These are sometimes hard to find, due to the many things that can trigger an O2 fault. This is just a quick way to check the sensors, just be sure to reset the codes after recording them.


3

Bank 1 Sensor 2 should be the sensor downstream of the catalytic converter. Bank 1 Sensor 1 would be upstream of the catalytic converter. With a 4 cylinder, everything should be Bank 1 (No Bank 2). So, Bank 1 Sensor 2 should be the one under the car. The one on/at the exhaust manifold should be Bank 1 Sensor 1. You might eyeball the wiring and / or ...


3

I would get a reversing camera instead. You can get the type that is mounted on the license plate and then you can either get a radio/headunit which supports backup cams or get a rearview mirror which has a backup display. Personally I would try to get a rearview mirror one. I think you can get the mirror for about ~$500 with the camera but I don't remember ...


3

My worry about the electromagnetic one is that while it is good at picking up metal objects that you may hit, they aren't so good at organic objects. Ultrasonic reversing sensors are good at detecting solid objects, but not so good at soft objects. As solid objects are important to identify, whether or not they are metal, the ultrasonic sensors are, in my ...


3

My guess is that they either fitted brake pads that don't have wear sensors or didn't connect the wear sensors correctly.


3

I am not positive from the picture but if that is screwed into the steering rack it's the Front sub-steering angle sensor. If it's in a hose which seems more likely to me it's the power steering pressure switch. Pictured below Link to Autozone site for part Power steering pressure switch reports power steering high pressures to the on-board computer ...


3

I caved (mainly since it is dangerous to keep driving it like it is) and brought it to my local mechanic. He says it is the Idle Air Intake control. I am not going to accept this answer until I can do a test drive. EDIT: Well my mechanic was right on the nose. The replacement worked like a charm.


3

If the injectors are fired electrically(which they most likely are), you could wire in a voltage-switch to the injectors, so that it is closed when the injector is fired. This would allow you to measure the time spent open, and do a little math based on the flow-rate of the injector to get a calculated measurement of the fuel injected into the system. If ...


3

I'm a little concerned by the proposed fixes. While I don't know the specifics of your Merc, I find it odd that the timing chain would be responsible for fuel trim codes. The ECU swap seems to be a concerted attempt at what I like to call 'parts roulette': possible, but not probable. If you have codes for fuel trims and misfires, the principal components ...


3

Most of the time, intake air temperature is not the same as ambient air temperature. This is because the air absorbs heat from the hot engine bay area before the intake air temperature sensor (IATS) measures its temperature.The heat-soak effect typically worsens on hot days and when the engine is under high loads. Another factor to consider is that the ...


3

OK, so it seems like the IAT on this model is integrated with the MAF:


2

Sounds like one of two scenarios depending on the design. -58 is the lower limit and happens whenever the sensor has no connection, or a direct connection. The first step is to unplug the sensor and look at the temp if it goes to -58 then you have a loose or open connection somewhere between the sensor and the computer. If when you unplug the sensor it ...


2

If you remove the passenger side foot kick panel covering the ECU you will see it there. On the 97 it is the blue 2 pin plug.


2

On a modern car, there's no real work to be done after physically replacing the part. You can disconnect the negative battery for 10-15 mins to reset the computer and have it relearn its mappings, but that's not strictly necessary.


2

Wiring problem? Unplug the connector and check the pins with a multimeter. If it looks alive, trace the wiring from the connector as far as you can. If you're lucky you'll be able to visually see a problem, it not, you'll have to probe the wires until you find the fault. If it's actually dead at the sensor, are you sure you've got the correct part? ...


2

You don't mention the type of engine you've got or the age. Older engines that are fitted with distributors and mechanical ignition systems typically drive their tachometers off the coil trigger wire, as this pulses each time a spark plug is fired. If that is the case, you simply need to connect a suitable tacho to the -ve terminal of the coil (i.e. the ...



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