Hot answers tagged

9

Your glossing over how the hack actually happens. The hack involves erasing the old keys and then reprogramming a new key to the vehicle. If the car uses a smart key then you're in right away. If the car has a physical key then having the correct cut of key is also required. Cars also fall into two categories. The first is the real expensive cars that ...


9

In general airbags don't have an expiration date. The airbags in a modern vehicle are designed to last for life. Some manufacturers have service intervals for the airbags, but it's normally a visual check and making sure the SRS (airbag) diagnostic systems is functioning correctly. Mercedes put expiration date stickers on the door sill with an expiration ...


6

If you really want a no-install option, and even @paulster2 answer seems like work then why not use old school locks like gear/steering locks? Or better, this -


6

Short answer: Yes, yes and yes. BUT: A tire doesn't have an expiry date. The reason for all three points is that the rubber gets harder over time and looses its grip / traction, especially on wet ground. Keep in mind grip is not only important for acceleration and braking, but it also keeps the car on the street in curves. Rubber not only gets harder, but ...


6

You should check to see if your car is under the current Takata Air Bag recall Does an Airbag Expire? While some automakers have set time limits on when to replace an airbag, the actual components are extremely durable. The key difference is the type of seal used to house the airbag igniter, also known as the squib. "Almost all squibs since Day ...


5

Your concern is valid. This article gives a good description of the weakness of smart keys. A man in the middle attack can fool the car to think that the key is inside allowing it to start. Once the car is running it won't shut off if the key leaves the car. These keys are battery powered and if that battery dies while you are driving on the highway it may ...


5

Not a specific answer for a Toyota Prius, but: This summer, we had an incident here in Germany, where the motor stopped after throwing the key out of the window. There's an online police report, so this is not a hoax. Here is my short translation: A 33 year old mother was driving her VW Passat on the highway (German "Autobahn") A1 near Lübeck with her ...


5

The other day while I was searching for information on electronic relays, I ran across this solution to your problem: (I found it on this site.) Here is the write up which goes along with it, which I find pretty cool: This is a clever little circuit involving two relays and a momentary switch and is more a of a 'logic' circuit than one used to switch ...


5

Your best bet is actually going to your local Mitsubishi dealer, make sure you have your registration/insurance with you. Should be able to provide it free of charge.


4

It sounds like the lock on your driver's door is stuck (leading to the first symptom), which has led to it constantly sending the "lock" signal to the central locking, causing the second symptom. If you can get the door open, you should be able to disconnect the central locking wiring from the lock to stop it locking the other doors, then investigate why ...


4

One answer is simply to wait - according to the manual, after 5 hours the immobilizer will reset, and in fact the next morning the car started fine. I took it into a independent Volvo shop today, and was told that the connection on the antenna ring sometimes goes bad, but the ring itself rarely needs to be replaced - taking off the connector and spraying ...


3

No, it will not stop mid-ride. It will warn you the key is no longer in the car, but as long as you don't turn it off, it will keep running until you run out of gas or the car battery dies. It would be a safety hazard for it to randomly die, or even a slow turn off. Imagine if you were on a 65mph high way when it happens, or in the middle of an intersection. ...


3

I used the switch that is connected to the clutch pedal. It is used to ensure the clutch is depressed when starting the vehicle. It's a great option as it's simple to access and it's low current. Just put another switch in line with the existing switch. I'm taking it a step further and adding an RFID reader that enables the switch for a short period of ...


3

Just so you are aware most clutch assemblies (at the pedal) have a pin with a cotter key holding the clutch cable to the pedal and if you just remove that it will not operate! Also doesn't cost anything. Bit of a pain crawling under dash but cheaper.


3

How about something like the Lock Box KeyGuard Pro?


3

If you want to bypass your antitheft, you can attach one of your PATS keys inside your steering collumn by the lock cylinder. This will make the car always 'see' a key with a chip. You caqn then use a regular steel key. This is also a 'cheater' fix when installing remote starts on cars with PATS so you don't need to buy a module.


3

Before the advent of engine immobilisers, the typical attack was to pop the door open, pull hard left and right on the steering wheel (one or two people) to break the steering lock, followed by either using a screwdriver to turn the lock barrel or to short circuit the live wire from the battery to the switched wire to the ignition. This could be done in a ...


2

SOLUTION: As is turns out, I was not connected to the VATS resistor value/ground reference wires at all. The PLJX instructions SUCK and give almost no info on VATS systems while everything is written up more for the older Passlock I and II systems. I had followed the instructions as spot-on as I could and found the yellow/black/green wire that was inside a ...


2

According to this source it's possible to program door lock/unlock with a $35 "blank" remote. The immobiliser part of it is unfortunately a bit more high tech (like you would hope). All you need to do is a set sequence with the ignition and remote to reprogram it. I'm not sure if the model's of the fit remote they are talking about and your 2011 are ...


2

According to this website: There is no onboard programming procedure for this vehicle. This vehicle requires special equipment be connected to the vehicle to program the keyless remote. Try a locksmith before the dealership, they are usually 50% the cost. You'll have to purchase a replacement key/fob (or two) and then take it somewhere to have it ...


2

GoPro has a multicamera configuration where you can align the time and merge all of the feeds into a multi screen single interface feed. They store the video centrally in a wifi enabled storage device using 802.11g Most of the commercial solutions are cost prohibitive.


2

You would need to "Re-Engineer" an adapter once you accomplish "Disabling" your OBD-2 port. How you do that, is honestly up to your judgement. Depending on the vehicle they also have factory ports in very odd locations. Nissan, Toyota and a few European brands are known for this. Vehicle hacking is becoming a real thing that people DO have to worry about. ...


2

If I was as worried as you seem to be about this, which I am not, I'd probably do the following; Go to a breakers yard and buy the OBD II port from a similar model. I'd then unscrew the existing port and push it back into the recess of the dashboard, then fit the new dummy port in its place. Alternatively, add an aftermarket security measure such as an ...


2

I think modifying the OBD-II port is complete overkill to deal with a possible theft issue. In addition to being a tricky issue as to how exactly to modify it, as the other answer points out, it may actually be illegal. When I have had to leave cars unattended and I have had some concern about possible theft, I usually unplug a component in the ignition ...


2

The easiest way is to take the vehicle VIN to a Ford dealership and ask them as they keep all of the codes. As long as you can prove it is your vehicle (registration should work fine) they'll give it to you for free. This is true of about any vehicle manufacturer. There may be a code on the radio itself. Give the dealership a call and ask what information ...


2

I can't speak for your region, but where I am there are several locksmith/key shops able to cut and program the blank key for a fraction of the cost.


2

With very old aftermarket electronics the only real thing that can be done is removing the system. With aftermarket electronics there is little to no support, no replacement parts and no predictable failure mode. Before you drive your self insane or get stranded somewhere when the system fails altogether, remove the immobilizer system.


2

Since the key-less entry system operates via wireless signals without physical contact to the ignition system.... You may be able to use tinfoil to cover the key so that the signal that the key puts out may not be boosted. The key-less systems seem very similar to RFID cards if not the same. I think that they have RFID technology in Europe for awhile now. ...


2

In the worst case, using an expired tyre can be fatal - as the rubber ages, it perishes (dries out), and becomes weaker and brittle. At speed, it heats up and the pressure increases (as the air inside also heats up). This can lead to a blowout - there is a well known case in the UK where a classic car owner had 25 year old 'new' (i.e. previously unused) ...



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