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20

While I believe the tire shop gives free rotation to get you in the habit of coming back to them every few months so they can sell you more, it can be important to rotate your tires. It all depends on the wear of the tires I have had sets of tires that wore extremely evenly and I only rotated them once. Other sets of tires I have had wore very unevenly ...


14

Your owners manual should tell you how often to replace the spark plugs in addition to that I would inspect the spark plugs every 5000 miles. Spark Plug Conditions Normal operation will show a light tan or gray color. The gap clearance will be slight with very little deposits on the insulator tip. A plug that indicates replacement will show ...


10

The short answer is "yes." The longer answer seems to hinge on the cost. The 30K mile service on my 2004 WRX included the following: Inspect Drive belt(s) [Except camshaft] Inspect Camshaft drive belt Replace Engine oil Replace Engine oil filter Perform Replace engine coolant and inspect cooling system, hoses and connections Recommended Performance ...


10

The Body Control Module is a computer which controls many things in your car not directly related to the engine. Instead of large wiring looms en relais and circuits all over the car all the buttons connect to a single computer which in turn turns on the headlights, open the windows, control the central door locking, etc. A good example is the VAGCOM system ...


9

In general, at the very minimum, you will want to check air pressure in tires, and all fluid levels and ensure that they are at the proper levels. Also, checking the condition of the oil and possibly changing it if it is needed (on a trip that long, probably wouldn't hurt to go ahead and do that if it over halfway till the next one anyways). If staying ...


7

tl;dr: a broken timing belt always means some sort of damage. Like Brian says, interference engines are obviously at risk of the most straightforward damage: pistons hitting valves with great energy, causing ma$$ive destruction. Here is a cautionary video illustrating some of the parts that can be immediately broken, causing a appalling domino effect of ...


6

Check with the manufacturer to see if it's an interference engine or not. Even so, that's not an absolute guarantee. Occasionally someone with an interference engine will get lucky and not have the valves and pistons attempt to occupy the same space at the same time. I've also heard anecdotal reports of non-interference engines suffering damage when ...


6

It sounds like you're asking several questions at the same time. In terms of the symptoms of failure, you don't give a lot of information about your specific car. However, some basics always apply: leaks (especially at the bottom of the timing belt cover) and basic failure to move the coolant (are you overheating this summer?). In terms of cost, you're ...


5

Some tires are directional and should never be moved from one side of the car to the other (at least not without flipping the wheel around too). They'll have an arrow on the sidewall marking "direction of rotation." Switching those from front to back to front will definitely make them last longer. Not only do tires wear out on faster on the drive axle, ...


5

Staring with my own list: Change oil and filter (obviously) Check engine fluids transmission fluid brake fluid anti-freeze washer fluid power steering fluid Check air filter, clear gently with air compressor if available Rotate tires if applicable (every 10k miles comes out to every 2-3 oil changes depending on frequency) Check all lights. (including ...


5

The 30k service, as performed by a Honda Dealer, would consist of the following things: First and foremost a basic oil change service. This includes oil and filter, adjustment of tire pressures, and an inspection of the underside of the vehicle(suspension and steering, exhaust, etc), the topping off of any fluids, and a check of all front and rear lights. ...


5

If you've never done your own work, I wouldn't recommend the first two as your first venture. You should make your own call, of course. The third sounds fishy and I wouldn't address it at all without a clearer understanding of what they're trying to sell you. Just from looking these items over, they look like scheduled maintenance. Those types of tasks ...


5

As Bob says, formal servicing should always follow the manufacturer's schedule - Make sure to take into account any variations suggested for your location/climate/usage pattern. This should include routine things like oil and filter changes, as well as more major, but less frequent things such as timing belts. In terms of more general checks and ...


5

Open up the hood and look at the emissions control system label. That will indicate whether it meets California emissions standards or not. See this page from the California DMV for what to look for. Also, at least for California (Not sure about other California-standards states), you can register a 49-state vehicle in California after you move there if ...


4

Impossible to say. I can only offer my own anecdotal Toyota experience. I had to have the engine rebuilt on my MR2 at 180,000 miles (due to oil pump failure). The original water pump was still working fine, no leaks, no problems at all at that point. However, since the whole engine was out and being rebuilt, we replaced it. At my 240,000 mile timing ...


4

A quick assessment of your normal consumables is worthwhile - do any bulbs need replacing, check your wiper blades, are there any visible leaks? Check your oil, depending on your relationship with your MOT garage, is it worth replacing your oil yourself, or can they do it cheaply if necessary? The only other thing I would do to make life easy for the ...


4

The short answer is that you should always be guided by the maintenance schedule by the calendar set forth in your owner's manual. It will have a detailed calendar based on your usage profile and setting forth major items based on miles or dates, depending on what's most appropriate. Using my car as an example, there's a moderately major service required ...


4

It's not necessary, but VERY recommendable to change all the related things. I had often enough, that the old water pump got leak after change of timing belt because of different tension. You may be lucky, and nothing will happen. But if, you will have to pay almost the same high price just to change only a water pump, tensioning roller, guide pulley or ...


3

There is some sort of a lock-tight compound inside that thread. I have already removed that screw in my V6 Accord twice. (Practically the same engine) The first time was a pain. I have good socket spanners so instead of braking a socket I broke a, 1/2" in diameter, extension shaft. I used 5 feet long extension bars on both sides of a wrench - delivered ...


3

When you change your oil, there are places that will take your used motor oil. My Dad's shop uses used motor oil as fuel in the furnace to keep the garage warm in the winter. I know this seems obvious to many, but it never surprises me the number of people that would just dump this stuff in the grass :(


3

Always follow the guidelines in your owner's manual. There will be specific instructions on how your tires should be rotated and, therefore, will also guide you on tire purchases. My car is AWD and requires unidirectional tires (check the sidewalls - there will be an indication on both sides of the tire showing "rotation direction" to remind you). Tires ...


3

"Repairs" may be the wrong term, these are more preventative maintenance. These particular items are some that there's a lot of debate in regards to whether or not they're worthwhile. They may be on some particular models, but not others. Power steering flush is not something I ever hear of people doing anymore. However, I'm not a Ford guy, could be ...


3

The synthetic oil should last longer without degrading, so if you are doing less miles this should safely extend the oil change period. Check with your garage that you get the correct synthetic oil.


3

Here's a pdf explaining how the maintenance minder works http://techinfo.honda.com/rjanisis/pubs/OM/NV0707/NV0707G00016A.pdf All the "due" services are to be checked and performed if needed. If it recommended and air filter, but the air filter is not dirty. Then it is not to be replaced. The system cannot compensate for such conditions. If you are worried ...


3

Subaru recommends every 48000 km or 30 months. It also recommends that it be changed more often if used in severe conditions. Severe duty would be lots of stop and go use like a taxi would see. Or very dusty conditions, wet conditions, towing heavy loads etc. The reason for the flush and change is because brake fluid absorbs water and water promotes rust. ...


3

Belts. You should carry spare belts in the trunk anyway. Hoses. Some people carry spare radiator hoses. Brakes. Unless you don't plan on stopping on your trip. Battery. Clean crud off terminals and be sure the battery is decent enough to start the car at some rest area in the middle of nowhere at 3am. Check voltage to ensure alternator is functioning ...


2

I was originally in the "follow the directions" camp but after I didn't rotate tires on one car because I was being lazy, I found a real advantage of not rotating. Not rotating is a diagnostic tool. If you don't rotate your tires you are more likely to notice a problem. A wheel out of balance, alignment problem or worn wheel bearing. Thus, the right answer ...


2

I have always noticed that the tires on the drive axle of my vehicles wear out sooner than the other ones. This seems to be especially true of modern, high horsepower, front wheel drive vehicles, since the front tires do the acceleration, most of the braking, and the steering. If you can have the tires rotated for free, I don't see any harm in having that ...


2

Batteries When buying a new battery, most Auto parts stores will recycle your old battery for you. For example, Autozone charges an extra $12 (or so), which is refunded to you when you return your old battery.


2

Don't forget to change the oil drain plug gasket/washer. Particularly if it's a "crush washer". Even on the copper ones that you can re-use a couple of times, I just replace them every time. When I get oil filters for my cars, I also get a washer for each, and tape it to the filter box, so it's right there when I need it. I usually do this right where I ...



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