New answers tagged

1

If it's tight'ish it'll probably be fine.. However make sure the other four nuts are torqued up properly! Also make sure that the looser nut &stud can NOT be undone, as you don't want one of those things flying through somebody else's windscreen I would advise that you get it replaced as soon as you can. If the nut just spins it's likely the splines that ...


2

I suggest you bring your vehicle to your local garage to double check your torque specs for your wheel lugs. They probably will not charge you for this; since it takes only five minutes. It is especially important to get this checked if your driving the car on a road trip.


4

It'll be good enough to drive to the nearest tire shop, and ask them to sort it. Shouldn't be expensive/time consuming


5

No one is going to tell that driving with a missing lug nut for huge distances at highway speeds is a good idea. If the question was "can I drive to the shop like this", you might get some people to capitulate, but you're talking about a cross-country journey. I doubt you car would pass a safety inspection without all the lugs, so you shouldn't take a huge ...


4

I'm going to take a different approach to this. As pictured, it's perfectly safe, and sometimes recommended to spread out the pressure to avoid damage. However, I've also seen a pile of wood used to extend a jack's height...and then fall over. Don't do that! (The car in question landed on the freshly-unpadded jack with the oil pan...messy.)


6

It is ABSOLUTELY safe. I do this all the time. Mind you I usually use a piece of 2x4, though. It spreads the load over more of the frame or body and keeps the jack stand from doing any damage. The jack stand does dig into the wood, which is much better than digging into your vehicle. The wood can crack. The wood can do a lot of things. But once the wood is ...


9

This is a good recommendation The wood will compress a bit when you lower your car down onto it. The jack stand will dig into the wood as well. The benefits related to this related to the vehicle slipping on the jack stands. I've never had a piece of wood fail doing this, although soft white pine sometimes comes out looking pretty beat up. To answer ...


2

You could attach a visor panel on your sun shade and place the life hammer there. Something like this MOLLE-compatible visor could work: The MOLLE attachments give you plenty of versatility, and its size allows you to attach more than just the hammer.


6

Since you posted another question about an Aveo/Kalos i guess you are talking about that car. Some come with the holder, with the possibility to attach it to the door or somewhere close to the knee but it can end being in the way and usually is too far. I had a couple of bad accidents where the seatbelt locked and didn't slide anymore and I wouldn't have ...


1

Engineers typically design parts to withstand a greater load than they are actually expected to see. This is known as a "factor of safety" and assures the parts won't fail when extenuating circumstances are encountered where the product is stressed beyond the design calculations considered. Given that NASCAR is a very specific type of racing with ...


5

Quite simply, no it is not safe. If a car manufacturers specifications say 5 studs, that's because they've done their homework on the forces involved. Think of the worst case: braking hard while turning sharply on a rough surface. The mass of the car, acting at an acute angle to the rim, comes down on the wheel lugs with a g-force proportional to the ...


0

Steel rims are cheaper to replace than alloy wheels. Alloy wheels tend get damaged by the salt and can develop air leaks around the tire beads. Steel rims you can paint with tremclad type of paint to deal with the rust prior to mounting tires. Steel rims are also full rims which help protect the brakes from ice,snow and salt. Alloy rims don't offer the same ...


1

Going by the results of tests carried out by consumer organizations: no-name/unknown-brand tires often don't perform as well as the well-known brands. Worse: performance tended to be uneven. Cheap tires that worked well in the dry would have 2x the stopping distance of all the others in the wet, for example. There are outliers, both positive and negative of ...


3

In Europe, only tires with an EU Tire Label are allowed to be sold. Big brands were initially happy for the introduction of this label, but were disappointed about the results. Those "crap" Chinese tires were performing almost equal with the big brand tires, but cost half as much. A lot people say "it's your safety don't do it". The companies would be very ...


8

Some sensitive electronic devices need a dedicated ground directly to the battery to cut down on DC line noise, in other words they need a clean as possible DC voltage supply. Some vehicles do not have easily accessible good grounds, so its an installers choice just to go to the battery. Other times the installer is not smart enough to find/determine a ...


6

Fun fact: the average mid-sized car tire sees ~800 revolutions per mile, so every component of a 50k mile tire must endure more than 40 million loading/unloading cycles! (note: some tires are not guaranteed for 50k miles). Source + testing information can be found in the PDF titled 'The Pneumatic Tire' on this page. Regardless of mileage rating, all tires ...


6

In the US, the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) is the governing body that controls testing and specifications of motor vehicles. They mandate that a certain set of standardized tests are carried out on all tires sold for highway use. Tires that are made for off-road equipment and possibly some trailers might not have to undergo the ...


3

I have been involved in several aspects of the old car world since the early 70's. This subject has come up more and more in the last maybe, ten years and I have spent alot of time pondering it and my involvement in historic racing has given me additional perspective on the subject I think. The basic answer is no, older cars are not safe as newer stuff for a ...



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