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3

I have been involved in several aspects of the old car world since the early 70's. This subject has come up more and more in the last maybe, ten years and I have spent alot of time pondering it and my involvement in historic racing has given me additional perspective on the subject I think. The basic answer is no, older cars are not safe as newer stuff for a ...


1

A crash test is not a very accurate model of crash prevention, there's actually no real way to test for what can occur in a real accident. These tests are designed for one purpose, to pass the national safety rating, which is goopy sales talk for "we shot the pop can at 900 miles an hour" if its black box survived to tell us its individual parts fate it ...


3

(firefighter here) simple answer: Yes. A lot. why? The structure is much more stable and deforms pretty much less in an accident (for example, cutting the struts of an old car takes 2-3 secs, a modern BMW about 15 secs). Airbags. A lot more, also on the side etc. Belt-release system that doesn't block completely and therefore decelerates you slower. ...


5

No car is safe! It can (and does) hurt and kill much more than anything most of us do frequently. Best safety equipment is the operator of the vehicle....NOTHING can replace an alert, smart, and knowledgeable driver! Anyone with knowledge of their vehicle and its limitations can be a safe and courteous fellow driver. With that stated, the advancements in ...


5

Used tires, how can I be sure that they are roadworthy? Asked what vehicle they came from if possible. Aside from looking at the general appearance, how do I properly inspect the tire(s)? Make sure no bulges exist: Make sure the tire's are not dry rotted: Look to see if any metal is showing on the inside or surrounding of the tire or if ...


5

Since the tire is used, having a way to check the tread depth is going to be important, and if you are buying a set of two for a single axle, make sure you can get two that have the same amount of tread so you don't put extra strain on your differential (assuming driven wheels). If you're getting one tire, try and match the remaining tread on your existing ...


1

Personally, I would try it. Assuming there was a built in safety factor, I loaded 100 lbs of mountain bike/rack onto the 75 lb limited factory roof rails/cross bars on an '04 Toyota RAV4, and other than a little bit of flexing in the cross bars, there were zero issues after an hour of 70+ mph highway cruising. Just to make sure, I would strap them on and ...


7

Safety in crashes (protecting you): Improvements are visible on a decadal scale and the tend to aggregate over time. (this is somewhat backed up by the plot with the dips discussed above) 2016: Cars commonly come with lane centering, adaptive cruise control, devices to keep the driver awake, and automatic stop features. 2010: Pretty much every car comes ...


4

Can anything be done to improve the safety of classic vehicles? You can attach & use safety equipment like a racing seat & harness, helmet, even a roll cage: This article about Racing Safety Equipment has lots of info, including a warning about roll cages and helmets (especially when putting steel bars near your head): An accident ...


8

As others have said, your asking different questions so I will address them separately. Classic cars are safe to drive Classic cars are simply older cars. They were driven successful by people of the time who didn't die in them and nothing has fundamentally altered the safety of the car since that time. If you drive a classic in the same way as you drive a ...


2

When disconnecting a battery always remove the negative terminal first. This breaks the circuit and neutralizes the possibility of a short circuit. When reconnecting the battery always connect positive terminal first. Never underestimate 12 volts : Under normal conditions the outer skin resistance is high enough not be an issue. However if you have open ...


1

In addition to the other answers: if the tools you use are exposed metal, wrap some tape around the handle to insulate it. After you've removed one battery cable, cover the exposed terminal. This prevents the cable end from contacting the terminal again.


3

Do I need to concern myself with being shocked while trying to change the battery? 12V is too low to present any significant electric shock hazard. The biggest hazard when working on batteries is shorting the thing out. This leads to a massive release of energy which can lead to severe burns. Some precautions that can be taken to reduce the risk. If ...


10

In the event of an accident, how does a classic vehicle compare to a modern machine? Badly. Are safety features on new vehicles really a life saver? Yes. Can anything be done to improve the safety of classic vehicles? There are certainly safety improvements that can be made. You can fit better brakes and tyres. You can sometimes retrofit ...


11

Classic cars are significantly less safe than modern cars. In a classic car, it is both harder to avoid a crash and more likely that you will sustain serious or fatal injuries in the event of a crash. It's the former point I'd like to emphasize in this answer. First, a classic car will not have features like ABS, traction control, or stability control. This ...


22

No, they are not safe Safety standards dating back to before now were not as stringent as they are now. The further in time you go back the less safe they become. Safety has been driven by governments and as regulations have become more stringent over time car manufacturers have had the responsibility to conform to the compliance stack of the time. ...


16

You've already seen the safety comparisons. With that being said, classic cars are for fun. If you're looking for safety, a classic car isn't for you. If you're looking to have fun, go for it. Like most things in life, there's a balance that you have to evaluate. No one can answer that for you. You have to do it for yourself. Are you willing to take ...


14

Given the assertion that most car accidents occur at speeds of 12MPH or less, most classic cars should be considered safe. Your odds of surviving a crash at parking-lot speeds are very good. However, your chances of walking away with only some bruises are much lower than with a modern car. In even a walking-speed collision, a classic car is going to transfer ...


15

You're asking two different questions - are they safe, and are they as safe as a modern car. For the second question - No. An older car without all the modern safety features will not protect you, your passengers, or pedestrians as well as a modern car will in the event of a crash - You don't have airbags, crumple zones, ABS, NCAP ratings and so on. For ...


63

Physical safety Modern cars are amazingly more safe than classic cars. Guys that are into classic cars frequently throw around phrases like "They don't make them like they use to!" or "This is built like a tank with real American Steel!", but when you look at a classic car in an accident, the results are pretty obvious. In 2009 this crash test was done ...


2

Wait what? Let's look at some physics here. If you have less grip in the front, your car understeers, you hit the tree and you die. If you have less grip in the rear, you ovesteer, you hit the tree and die again, not seeing what killed you. 1. Rear end Grip Shocks are important to maintain the balance of the vehicle in a turn and ensure contact of the ...


2

I have had alloy wheels in extreme cold time of winter, and the ice build up causes the wheels to become unbalanced. I don't know if this is because of the type of metal the wheel is, or the light weight of alloy. I now have steel wheels for my winter tires and alloy for summer. I suspect the unbalance comes from the light weight of alloy, but maybe alloy ...


13

Duct Tape. Of course. Take a piece of duct tape and tape it to the lip of the ramp. Run it out 12 inches/30cm and then fold it over and run it back to the ramp. Stick this on the backside of the ramp. As you roll up on the ramp, the tape will be trapped underneath your tire and the ramp will be unable to slide away.


6

I put a long enough 2X4 behind both ramps and then two to three cinder blocks behind the wood to keep it from moving. You can substitute the cinder blocks for anything else that's heavy (but don't have your mother in law stand in because then she won't shut up about it). ;) |block| |block| |block| ---------------2X4------------------ |ramp| ...


13

Use an old towel underneath the ramp, such that your vehicle runs onto the towel first ramp |¯¯¯\ |____\ towel Owheel ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ This is possibly the cheapest, simplest & least destructive method (as long as you don't mind your towel maybe getting small holes in it.) Old towels make the best general purpose rags. edit: if the towel still slips once ...


6

You can fasten wooden stoppers to the floor with concrete bolts. Alternatively, you could notch your floor in a specific area for where you would use your stands. You could get a friend to hold the stands in place with a piece of wood as well. If none of these are an option for you, as long as you have a steady wall or object in front of the stands, you ...


12

Threaded Inserts in your concrete I have placed various threaded interference inserts in my garage/shop floor. I've put them in locations where they will be useful to tie down a motorcycle or to have a bolt just sticking out of the cement to prevent something like this from sliding. I've used various diameters of insert. I can use them for a variety of ...


9

One way would be to use the non-slip padding they make for kitchen shelves. Put a square of that down, and put a slightly smaller 3/4in plywood square on top of it. Then the ramp on top of the plywood. The rubber sheet prevents the slide, and the feet of the ramp dig just enough in the wood to prevent it from moving.


12

The safest method to increase the jack height without purchasing more equipment is to work in a level surface that provides a natural "grease pit" environment. Assuming you only need more room to maneuver yourself under the car: parking LEVEL/FLAT over a steep curb, gutter, sidewalk, gulley, etc. will give you that extra room to move. From there you can ...


7

This is a body ground. This is not the main ground, but will affect how anything attached to the ground will work. This might mean your radio or your lights might not work. It might mean the computer in your car (if it has one) won't work. There are any of a hundred things which could go wrong, but you should still be able to jump your vehicle. With this ...


16

Wood. It's plenty strong. Cut some 2x6 or 2x8 and stack them accordingly. This is the most cost effective way to solve your problem. The only danger you will encounter is if you used rotten wood. I realize the picture is not 2x6's, etc, but, it displays the idea.


12

Adding this as an additional answer since I was reminded of it after seeing Zaid's answer. Hydraulic lift jacks are fairly pricey so I always wondered of an alternative and there is an item that has come out that is on my wish list called My Lift Stand. It is great if you do not need to access the brakes or require a wheel to be off and it adds additional ...


13

Hydraulic car ramps are a great option if you can source them. They give oodles of clearance by lifting the wheels themselves. You have to drive the wheels into them before using the hydraulic pump to lift the ramp. Drive-on ramps operate on a similar principle - just drive onto them


24

You could always look into jack stands that are typically used for heavy duty trucks and semis. One time I had a lifted truck I had to go to Northern Tool and purchase high reaction jack stands: Item link That said I wouldn't recommend using anything other than the jack stand. Even if you are using a block that block could still break from the pressure ...


4

There is no doubt that panic must be avoided. Just having the confidence that you will get out, knowing what to do in advance, and having the right tool prepared and you will be fine. According to the Mythbusters episode the keys are a glas break, and a seat belt cutter. Whatever tool you choose, testing it both gives you confidence in the tool and your ...


6

You can't open the door once the water level gets above the bottom of your doors. Don't even try. You're just wasting your precious energy. What you must do, is wind the windows down before the water shorts out the electrics. When people drown in cars, its often because they couldn't wind down the electric windows. Another important thing to note. It is ...


9

Every year hundreds die in submerged cars. (1) Getting out of a sinking car is very difficult. The reason for this is that the car will list to the driver's side due to the weight of the steering column and the driver's weight. That means you will be located on side of the car tilted downward. It also means the driver's side will fill up first with water. ...


8

It's fascinating to watch this Mythbusters episode, which takes your question one step farther: the car has turned upside down. Try as he might, Adam can't escape until pressure equalizes. And even then, he needs to use some of the canned air. This really drives home the point that the window is your first, best way out. Either in the 3-5 seconds before ...


7

As others have stated, stay calm. Try to control your breathing. You may have a few moments to roll your windows down before the electronics fail. If you are in an older vehicle, wind it down. You will not be able to open the door until there is buildup inside the cabin. Keep an emergency tool within reach and not inside the glovebox. If you do not have ...


10

I remember seeing a TV show in which two people in full scuba gear were placed in a car which was then pushed into a lake, and tried different ways of escaping. The experiment was repeated multiple times. Takeaways were: Once a door is partially below the water line, the pressure difference makes it impossible for a human to open until the interior has ...


6

You do not have to panic if you can not open or break the window. Take a big breath and when the interior fills up, the pressure difference disappears and you can open the door and swim out. I heard this as advice for people falling into the Danube but have not tried it myself.


6

If possible, roll one of the windows down before the electrics fail, then you can get out of it - but beware that the car will fill up and sink quicker with a window open... As others have said, a window-breaking tool is useful if you can't open one - but not kept in the glove compartment, you need it somewhere you can reach it with your seatbelt on, so ...


10

I would recommend avoiding places where your vehicle might sink. For example, don't use Apple GPS. Also consider riding a bike. This might make it easier to detect the problem before you have gotten too deep. Next, make sure you drive a vehicle with a sunroof. And finally, always make your friend get out of the car first. That way, if they sink, you can use ...


10

When the car goes into water, the best thing you can do for yourself is to stay calm. Your instinct is for flight, obviously, but getting yourself worked up is not going to do you any good. You have to think clearly. Going into the deep-end (sorry, had to) will most likely cause your demise. Proactively, you need to know your car. It's strange, but even ...


31

Get an emergency escape tool For being proactive, the best option is a emergency glass breaking device with a seatbelt cutter like this model: (Click image to enlarge) The Mythbusters have done two episodes on escaping a vehicle in water, and in the second episode, one of the camera men had to have his belt cut off him because he became suck when the ...


14

Taking from @roryalsop's response. Once free of the vehicle, especially in a flash flood, a flotation device can be a real life saver. Many vehicles have rear seats that you can pull out very quickly that are made of styrofoam. As well, a head rest could prove to be enough floatation to eas3 the burden of staying afloat or getting ashore for the ...


15

Depends how proactive you want to be. A really sensible preparation is to have a window shattering tool in your glove box. As soon as you have "finished" ending up in the water, get your seatbelt off and retrieve that tool, and pop your side window. You really want to exit the vehicle before it takes on enough water to sink - and firstly get onto the ...


37

If you can open the door, do it Then unbuckle, and bail out. If your car has sunroof and it works, open it and exit from it Your car electrics need to be functioning for this to work though. On some cars like VW's you can pop off an inner roof panel to reveal a hand crank to open the sunroof. Detach the headrest, use it to shatter the window glass¹ ...



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