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68

Physical safety Modern cars are amazingly more safe than classic cars. Guys that are into classic cars frequently throw around phrases like "They don't make them like they use to!" or "This is built like a tank with real American Steel!", but when you look at a classic car in an accident, the results are pretty obvious. In 2009 this crash test was done ...


39

If you can open the door, do it Then unbuckle, and bail out. If your car has sunroof and it works, open it and exit from it Your car electrics need to be functioning for this to work though. On some cars like VW's you can pop off an inner roof panel to reveal a hand crank to open the sunroof. Detach the headrest, use it to shatter the window glass¹ ...


34

Get an emergency escape tool For being proactive, the best option is a emergency glass breaking device with a seatbelt cutter like this model: (Click image to enlarge) The Mythbusters have done two episodes on escaping a vehicle in water, and in the second episode, one of the camera men had to have his belt cut off him because he became suck when the ...


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The only advice anyone could possibly give about this tire is that it should not be taken on the road. Out of respect for other peoples lives, the car should not be driven with even one tire like that on it.


24

You could always look into jack stands that are typically used for heavy duty trucks and semis. One time I had a lifted truck I had to go to Northern Tool and purchase high reaction jack stands: Item link That said I wouldn't recommend using anything other than the jack stand. Even if you are using a block that block could still break from the pressure ...


24

No, they are not safe Safety standards dating back to before now were not as stringent as they are now. The further in time you go back the less safe they become. Safety has been driven by governments and as regulations have become more stringent over time car manufacturers have had the responsibility to conform to the compliance stack of the time. ...


20

You've already seen the safety comparisons. With that being said, classic cars are for fun. If you're looking for safety, a classic car isn't for you. If you're looking to have fun, go for it. Like most things in life, there's a balance that you have to evaluate. No one can answer that for you. You have to do it for yourself. Are you willing to take ...


16

Wood. It's plenty strong. Cut some 2x6 or 2x8 and stack them accordingly. This is the most cost effective way to solve your problem. The only danger you will encounter is if you used rotten wood. I realize the picture is not 2x6's, etc, but, it displays the idea.


16

You're asking two different questions - are they safe, and are they as safe as a modern car. For the second question - No. An older car without all the modern safety features will not protect you, your passengers, or pedestrians as well as a modern car will in the event of a crash - You don't have airbags, crumple zones, ABS, NCAP ratings and so on. For ...


15

Depends how proactive you want to be. A really sensible preparation is to have a window shattering tool in your glove box. As soon as you have "finished" ending up in the water, get your seatbelt off and retrieve that tool, and pop your side window. You really want to exit the vehicle before it takes on enough water to sink - and firstly get onto the roof,...


15

Given the assertion that most car accidents occur at speeds of 12MPH or less, most classic cars should be considered safe. Your odds of surviving a crash at parking-lot speeds are very good. However, your chances of walking away with only some bruises are much lower than with a modern car. In even a walking-speed collision, a classic car is going to transfer ...


14

Taking from @roryalsop's response. Once free of the vehicle, especially in a flash flood, a flotation device can be a real life saver. Many vehicles have rear seats that you can pull out very quickly that are made of styrofoam. As well, a head rest could prove to be enough floatation to eas3 the burden of staying afloat or getting ashore for the ...


13

tl,dr: The short answer is no, with caveats. The longer answer starts with "well, you can kill your car with anything if you try hard enough." Let's use specific examples of when you should use your transmission for engine braking: Waimea Canyon or Mount Washington. In either case, you are descending thousands of vertical feet at significant grades. If ...


13

I'm going to answer the basic mechanical points, as weighted by my opinion of importance. I'm leaving out the issue of waxing as potentially too broad. Safety: These are critical. Do not proceed down the list without addressing each (at least). Safety glasses: Always wear them, especially when you don't think that you need to. I purchased mine from the ...


13

The damage you are showing is minor cosmetic damage. If the following occurs with sidewall damage, then get it replaced: Tire deflation (cannot be legally repaired in most countries) You pull the flap back and see damage to the side wall plies (corded area under the rubber which supports the tire) whether deflation has occurred or not Bulging of the tire ...


13

If it has been driving fine since then, all you have probably done is worn the brake pads down. Not fatal - but check when you pull the handbrake on that it is solidly holding the car stationary. If you notice vibration, then I'd worry about pads/disks being warped or damaged. You may find though that you need the handbrake cable to be tightened, as it may ...


13

Hydraulic car ramps are a great option if you can source them. They give oodles of clearance by lifting the wheels themselves. You have to drive the wheels into them before using the hydraulic pump to lift the ramp. Drive-on ramps operate on a similar principle - just drive onto them


13

Use an old towel underneath the ramp, such that your vehicle runs onto the towel first ramp |¯¯¯\ |____\ towel Owheel ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯ This is possibly the cheapest, simplest & least destructive method (as long as you don't mind your towel maybe getting small holes in it.) Old towels make the best general purpose rags. edit: if the towel still slips once ...


13

Duct Tape. Of course. Take a piece of duct tape and tape it to the lip of the ramp. Run it out 12 inches/30cm and then fold it over and run it back to the ramp. Stick this on the backside of the ramp. As you roll up on the ramp, the tape will be trapped underneath your tire and the ramp will be unable to slide away.


13

Classic cars are significantly less safe than modern cars. In a classic car, it is both harder to avoid a crash and more likely that you will sustain serious or fatal injuries in the event of a crash. It's the former point I'd like to emphasize in this answer. First, a classic car will not have features like ABS, traction control, or stability control. This ...


12

Adding this as an additional answer since I was reminded of it after seeing Zaid's answer. Hydraulic lift jacks are fairly pricey so I always wondered of an alternative and there is an item that has come out that is on my wish list called My Lift Stand. It is great if you do not need to access the brakes or require a wheel to be off and it adds additional ...


12

The safest method to increase the jack height without purchasing more equipment is to work in a level surface that provides a natural "grease pit" environment. Assuming you only need more room to maneuver yourself under the car: parking LEVEL/FLAT over a steep curb, gutter, sidewalk, gulley, etc. will give you that extra room to move. From there you can ...


12

Threaded Inserts in your concrete I have placed various threaded interference inserts in my garage/shop floor. I've put them in locations where they will be useful to tie down a motorcycle or to have a bolt just sticking out of the cement to prevent something like this from sliding. I've used various diameters of insert. I can use them for a variety of ...


12

In the event of an accident, how does a classic vehicle compare to a modern machine? Badly. Are safety features on new vehicles really a life saver? Yes. Can anything be done to improve the safety of classic vehicles? There are certainly safety improvements that can be made. You can fit better brakes and tyres. You can sometimes retrofit ...


12

Fixing a bent motorcycle wheel is situational. If you are on a 125 to 200cc motorcycle using it for commuting purpose and will be driving under the speed limit, I would not be worried and its absolutely fine to reuse a bent wheel. provided the bend was minimal , if its extensive then changing would be a wiser option. If you are on a 600 to 1000cc super ...


11

I would recommend avoiding places where your vehicle might sink. For example, don't use Apple GPS. Also consider riding a bike. This might make it easier to detect the problem before you have gotten too deep. Next, make sure you drive a vehicle with a sunroof. And finally, always make your friend get out of the car first. That way, if they sink, you can use ...


10

The Click & Clack method: Sitting in the driver’s seat (left or right-hand drive vehicle): Driver’s side mirror Lean your head against the window, and set the driver’s side mirror so that you can just see the side of your car in the mirror. Passenger side mirror: Position your head, as best as possible to the middle of the car. Use your radio, or ...


10

First off, everything Bob said. General Socket Extensions: Your socket set may come with 1 or 2 extensions but I'd buy a couple more. Having different length extensions are invaluable for getting to hard to reach items, plus you can combine them together for a longer extension. Socket U-Joint Adapter: I never see these in socket sets and you will regret ...


10

The tire store manager is pretty much on the money. A better way to say it, though, might be: A normal tire can lose up to 2 psi a month. Why is this important? Every tire/wheel combo is going to be different in the rate at which they lose air pressure. There are several ways (besides a puncture) a tire can lose air pressure. Those might include a bad ...


10

I have seen a lot of qualified mechanics leave the car on jack stands for months without any problems. It is more a question of where the car is being stored while on jack stands. In a garage where it is safe from accidentally being leaned on and possibly tipped over would be best (and out of sight from vandals/hooligans that might want to cause havoc, ...



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