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29

The only advice anyone could possibly give about this tire is that it should not be taken on the road. Out of respect for other peoples lives, the car should not be driven with even one tire like that on it.


13

tl,dr: The short answer is no, with caveats. The longer answer starts with "well, you can kill your car with anything if you try hard enough." Let's use specific examples of when you should use your transmission for engine braking: Waimea Canyon or Mount Washington. In either case, you are descending thousands of vertical feet at significant grades. If ...


13

I'm going to answer the basic mechanical points, as weighted by my opinion of importance. I'm leaving out the issue of waxing as potentially too broad. Safety: These are critical. Do not proceed down the list without addressing each (at least). Safety glasses: Always wear them, especially when you don't think that you need to. I purchased mine from the ...


13

If it has been driving fine since then, all you have probably done is worn the brake pads down. Not fatal - but check when you pull the handbrake on that it is solidly holding the car stationary. If you notice vibration, then I'd worry about pads/disks being warped or damaged. You may find though that you need the handbrake cable to be tightened, as it may ...


10

The Click & Clack method: Sitting in the driver’s seat (left or right-hand drive vehicle): Driver’s side mirror Lean your head against the window, and set the driver’s side mirror so that you can just see the side of your car in the mirror. Passenger side mirror: Position your head, as best as possible to the middle of the car. Use your radio, or ...


10

First off, everything Bob said. General Socket Extensions: Your socket set may come with 1 or 2 extensions but I'd buy a couple more. Having different length extensions are invaluable for getting to hard to reach items, plus you can combine them together for a longer extension. Socket U-Joint Adapter: I never see these in socket sets and you will regret ...


10

The tire store manager is pretty much on the money. A better way to say it, though, might be: A normal tire can lose up to 2 psi a month. Why is this important? Every tire/wheel combo is going to be different in the rate at which they lose air pressure. There are several ways (besides a puncture) a tire can lose air pressure. Those might include a bad ...


10

In the UK, it would be illegal to drive on this tyre. Therefore, if you were stopped by the police, they would have the right to stop you driving further, order a tow-truck to collect your car and remove it. They could then fine you and charge you for the costs of towing and returning your car. I don't know about other countries.


10

The best option I have seen is to put an old tire (without a rim) between the cars. The tire is flexible and provides a large surface area to minimize the possibility of dents and scratches. That said, many, many cars these days are just not pushable or capable of pushing. Many "bumpers" are for looks only and won't stand up to any real force without ...


9

For the majority of brakes, they should be fine after a track day, but the real risks come from significantly overheating the brake fluid, or from stopping with hot brakes and having them cool while parked. This is why at track days it is always recommended that you stop after ten or so laps, if you have standard brake systems, to allow your brake fluid and ...


9

I have seen a lot of qualified mechanics leave the car on jack stands for months without any problems. It is more a question of where the car is being stored while on jack stands. In a garage where it is safe from accidentally being leaned on and possibly tipped over would be best (and out of sight from vandals/hooligans that might want to cause havoc, ...


8

You can get transient spikes from the other car while it's trying to start. Any battery or alternator issues that affect power quality will be transmitted to your car. The good news is that large 12v batteries make excellent buffers against power issues that might otherwise cause damage. However, it is still possible to suffer damage to your car from ...


7

Bit of background: you can run your tires at various pressures, either under or over the recommendations. Over inflating the tires leads to overwear down the middle of the tire but a nice rigid tire - which is great for track days, smooth roads etc. Under inflating wears the outside edges more, and weakens the sidewalls meaning the tire can move about more - ...


7

You will likely be annoyingly loud but otherwise fine. As always, you are liable for your own compliance with local noise ordinances. I would recommend that you drive with the windows up until you give the car to the shop in order to avoid any risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. For example, don't drive with the trunk propped open: the low pressure behind ...


7

They are being used as approach lights. When someone unlocks their car with the remote the car turns on lights around the car. I think the idea is to light up the ground around the car for you to better see where you are stepping and maybe for security. Some cars turn on the headlights, interior lights, parking lights etc. You point does make turning on the ...


7

Would this be safe? tl;dr: No. It's hard to say exactly how unsafe or how bad the consequences might be. Assuming the rails themselves weigh on the order of 5-10 kg, you're talking about almost doubling the advised load on the whole system. From reading that advisory, it's hard to say exactly what failure modes their mechanical engineers are ...


6

Following on from Bob and ManiacZX's answers: Screwdrivers A good assortment of screwdrivers are essential - including torx or hex bits if your car uses them. Some socket sets include screwdriver bits, which can be very useful. An old long-handled flat driver can often double up as an impromptu pry-bar too... Hammer Like the above, you'll probably ...


6

It would not be reasonable to dig a trench under a vehicle to fit a part to a vehicle. The trench would need to be shored up so that it does not collapse inwards, especially if you are in the trench at the time. The cost of timbers and the time and effort involved to make things safe would be prohibitive. The way forward is contact your local recovery firm, ...


6

Let me preface this by you do any of this at your own (and passenger's if any) risk. That said, you should be able to drive this the extra 20 miles to get it home. I would drive slowly (back roads, 35mph maximum) if possible. The idea with that is to keep heat in the tire down to a minimum. Also, if it does blow out, you should be able to keep the car under ...


6

CFR 49 states that a reflective area is required. Manufacturers have blended the turn signals into dual purpose units that are reflectors as well as signal lamps. The lenses have reflective properties built into them. If you shine a light on the side of a vehicle you will see these properties when the car running lights are turned off. I noticed this ...


6

Normally a tire loses around 1-2 psi a month. However this figure is absolutely a generic statement. In real life, the figure depends upon various factors: How many miles/kms you drive daily? What is the condition of the road/tarmac that you generally drive on? What is your driving style? Aggresive or Defensive? Is there any puncture in your tires? ...


5

My experience, limited to a few very specific configurations is: I've never had rotor warping issues even after a LOT of heat in the brakes (both from track days and also stuck brakes while driving on the express way). I've used generic NAPA rotors, OEM rotors, and fancy heat/cryo treated ones. I can't tell any difference between any of them. They all ...


5

It wouldn't be a "security" concern, but it IS a safety concern. You are talking about your safety and the safety of those around you. If your vehicle does not stop as it should, your reaction time is increased, so you will not be stopping as soon as you would think you should, which could cause unanticipated results. My suggestion is that you update the ...


5

We have a few project cars and have left them on jack stands for long stretches of time while we were rebuilding stuff. I'll second Tariq that if the vehicle is held up at proper jack points you should have no problems. It's also a good point to have the vehicle somewhere secure, if only to keep curious people, pets, etc from crawling underneath and ...


5

If where you are putting the vehicle up at is level ground (driveway, for instance), there is plenty of support under the jack stands (like concrete pad), and you are putting the jack stands at secure locations under your vehicle extended the same amount (so vehicle is level), you will have no issues what-so-ever. Vehicles which are suspended like this are ...


5

The main purpose for this is so other drivers can see your turn signal. The LED lights are so intense, they do not allow the oncoming driver to be able to see the turn signal. By turning the LEDs off, it becomes readily apparent.


5

Gloves are not essential, but highly recommended When replacing a car battery there are three potential hazards that relate to safety: electrical hazard - the battery is capable of generating 100's of amps' worth of current. You want to avoid shorting the two terminals with something like a wrench, cable or your own body. Gloves can help reduce the risk ...


5

Its not uncommon for the control arm bushings on many Hondas/ Acuras to expire quickly. It is however a bit dangerous to drive with them if they are starting to wear down or dry rot. They harden when this happens and cause other components on your suspension and sub-frame to fail. The lateral and vertical shaking of your car will cause something to give ...


5

A seat belt pretensioner kind of resembles a gun. Under the seat by the center console there is a roughly 6 inch tube. Inside the tube is a slug with a pyrotechnic charge sitting behind it. The slug has a cable attached to it in such a way that when the slug is propelled down the tube the cable is retracted inside. The cable then is anchored at the bottom of ...


5

Although I am unsure of the material that is being used for the roadway in your photos it appears similar to Topmix Permeable concrete You asked Can anyone explain how new pavements achieve this remarkable performance at eliminating splashing? Response Topmix Permeable concrete is simply a very porous concrete interlaced with large rounded pebbles. ...



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