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9

Yes you need to replace the grease when you replace the boot. That grease lubricates the joint, if you don't have enough inside the boot the joint can fail prematurely. On a side note don't use one of the quick boots (the ones designed to be put on without taking the CV joint off of the car), in my experience they are worthless. Here is an example of a ...


9

From what I have seen and read over the last few years the "general rule" has become best tires on the rear. In my opinion it is likely the result of litigation by people who were involved in skidding accidents. The theory as far as I understand it, is that with worn tires in the rear, the back end can loose traction and allow the rear of the car to attempt ...


7

I'm living in a country where we need proper winter tires during that season so I have to switch between tires sets twice a year. Each switch I rotate the tires (rotation depends if the tires are direction or not) and mark the position on the one I remove for the next season to make sure to rotate them. Tire rotation is recommended (by Transport Canada and ...


5

Remove the shaft, and throw the boot away. Clean out the old dirty grease, after cleaning the part of course, and replace both the grease and boot. This gives you a chance to inspect the joint, and clean up any dirt residue that will speed up the deterioration of the CV joint.


3

No sense at all. You will have a terrible time finding any parts for it. My coworker had a very nice Saab last year, until a thief broke one of his windows. He searched high and low for a new window, and even if one could be found, it would have been overpriced. In the end, the Saab was replaced with a different car simply because of a broken window. Imagine ...


3

Saab Automobile Parts AB was not included in the sale of Saab Automobile AB. It is now in the ownership of Swedish National Dept Office. Saab Automobile Parts AB is not included in the sale of Saab Automobile AB The parts company continues to serve Saab customers globally with Saab Genuine Parts and aftersales service and also to expand its ...


3

The part on the picture is called "Companion flange" as per Saab's own electronic part catalogue (EPC) - number 7 on the drawing below. I'm not sure which one in particular you need, so here's the drawing itself: Full size Check whether your engine type is among the listed above. Part numbers are listed on the right, and you can use those when ordering ...


3

I think you need to jot down your VIN number and plug it into a VIN decoder (check out saabnet.com for starters).


2

I am not sure about Saab, but BMWs have a blowout resistor that controls the fan speed. The telltale that the resistor went bad is erratic/inoperative fan behavior.


2

I did some research on some Saab forums. I found that typically on US bound Saab 9-5 a bulb is installed on both sides. However, the metal circuit on the passenger side is cut to disable that side. This is to prevent the rear fog lights from appearing as brake lights (there are arguments about the legality of dual rear fog lights in certain US locations). ...


2

In lieu of a better (more specialized) answer, I would use high temperature grease. Nothing too expensive though, I doubt those hinges get hotter than 500F.


1

TireRack has an article specifically on this topic http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=52 -- edit: just found this: http://www.michelinman.com/mediabin/Approved/Michelin/Visuals/Digital/Two_Tire_Poster_Michelin_042009.pdf


1

If the question involved a brand that sold more units worldwide and had a history of using the same parts for many years I would go for the Saab if it was what I really wanted. I don't know many people who rely solely on the dealer for parts of seven year old cars. Most go to the aftermarket or used for routine wear and crash items. If 2007 was the last year ...


1

Are you using the correct spark plugs, or aftermarket? OEM makes a huge difference in certain vehicle brands.


1

An auto-electrician who installs alarms and remote unlocks would probably be able to help. The cars that do this already generally require you take the key out, too. I know high-end Subarus will re-lock a car within a minute or so if you don't open the door.


1

The legal requirement (in the UK) is for there to be at least one, however where your car is fitted with two rear fog lights they should both light up, otherwise you could fail an inspection if the police decided to stop you. All the cars I have ever owned have had 2 rear fog lights, but you do see a lot which have one side fitted with a red fog light and ...



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