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Both methods of drive have their advantages. FWD is generally cheaper to build, and gives more space inside the vehicle (as there is no need for a transmission tunnel). It is also generally easier for a less skilled driver to control - Most ordinary people don't want to need to learn how to drift or control a slide. On the other hand, smaller FWD cars can ...


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Some of what your friends have told you is nonsense. You will possibly have less chance of getting stuck in the winter in a RWD car, as RWD gives you more grip when trying to accelerate forwards (as weight moves rearward). Whenever I have had to rescue friends in FWD cars, I usually need to use reverse to get grip. Additional set of winter tyres? Nope - ...


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I grew up in Finland, where winters are long and icy. Mostly drove RWD cars, but also, at times, owned FWD and AWD ones. If you look at all the nordic/scandinavian rally champions, they preferred front wheel drive, until the Audi Quattro changed rallying forever. But that is assuming you are a professional rally driver... :) There is no clear answer - ...


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1) How troublesome is it to have RWD with above mentioned conditions? 2) What will be safer: RWD vs FWD on dry pavement, gravel, snow, ice? 3) What generally has better handling and traction during bad weather: heavy rain, snow, ice? With all do respect i have to disagree with Rory Alsop's asnwer. Please do the following: a.) Look up ...


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I guess it depends on where you live. I've driven mostly RWD, with some FWD and AWD. The only car I've ever gotten stuck in snow was FWD (when strong gusty winds blew me sideways off an icy road and into a snowbank). We can get sizeable amounts of snow some years here in Ohio, and even when driving around on Summer tires in the Winter I didn't ever get my ...



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