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14

The best thing to do would be to sand down the rusted area until you can see the original metal and then apply a automotive primer to protect it from the rust. If you feel pretty comfortable with a bottle of spray paint and aren't too worried about a pro job, you could then obtain some automotive spray paint and repaint the affected area(s). One thing to ...


11

tl;dr: Even if you only use spray wax after a wash, it's better than nothing. It depends on where you live, what kind of driving you do and how you generally maintain your car. The short answer is that waxing a car puts a sacrificial layer on top of the clear coat which sits on top of the paint (assuming that you have a generally standard paint job). ...


10

I used Napa Rust Treatment Permatex 765-1671 on my F-150 truck about 8 months ago and all the rust is gone! This treatment is like a grey primer. It's not pretty on a blue truck, but neither is oxidized red cancer.


7

Regular washing and waxing is your best bet. We kept our cars in one piece through the Rochester, NY winters with nothing more than this. The wax provides a sacrificial protective coating for the painted parts of the body. You can apply wax to your wheels as well. As a bonus, the brake dust will be easier to wash off of a waxed wheel. Then wash, wash, ...


6

Wash off the salt whenever possible. Inspect the car regularly (especially in locations where salt and water can get trapped). Repair any noticable damage immediately (damaged paint, damaged undercoating, etc). Set aside some spare funds in the anticipation of such repairs. My experience is that body panels don't rust, it's the strut towers, floor, and ...


6

You are looking for a mask to filter particulates, an N95 HEPA mask or should be sufficient, they are usually pink or purple in color. You are correct that a dust mask is insufficient. If you have a beard, or as I do just think these are more comfortable then you can use a PAPR (pronounced papper) or Powered Air Purifying Respirator. Here are some examples ...


6

First is to soak them with a good penetrating oil like Liquid Wrench, PB Blaster or Sea Foam. If you have access to an impact wrench, electric might work but pneumatics tend to have more torque. If you don't own one consider renting one or purchasing one from a store with a liberal return policy. If that is out of the question slide a pipe, crow bar, large ...


5

Yes and you should. Rust is always bad and it sounds like you have a relatively easy job. Remember, if you have rust, you don't have paint. If you're careful, there shouldn't be any effect on the paint surrounding the threaded hole. In terms of cleaning the threads out, you're going to need an abrasive to remove the rust and then a tool to remove any ...


5

First thing you need to get some type of penetrating oil. You need something like LiquidWrench,PB Blaster or SeaFoam. My personal favorite is PB Blaster. The second thing you need is patience. If you can, give the penetrant several days to work. I have had goodluck wrapping the fitting in a strip of rag and soaking it with the oil. If you can get the quick ...


5

If your rotors are thick enough and there are no defects in pads area (big grooves, buldgy edges) I would not worry at all. There's no need to replace rotors each time. If there are some defects that can be removed and the rotors are thick enough - consider resurfacing the rotors, that might be cheaper. All-in-all, given that the only downside is faster ...


5

For rust removal... my personal favorite technique involves a lot of distilled white vinegar and a green "scrunge" (like a 3M scrubbing pad) or a pad of steel wool. By "a lot" of vinegar, I mean never allow the surface to get dry - always keep it wet with vinegar or it'll "flash rust" while you work. This generally involves working only a fairly small area ...


4

Motorcycle folks seem to do this a lot, presumably because the gas tank is easy to remove and small enough to manhandle (personhandle?). A Google search produces a lot of results for how to do this, and any of the ways you've heard will probably work well. Here's one detailed list: http://www.mopedarmy.com/wiki/Removing_rust_from_a_gas_tank You have to ...


4

How serious are you about this? Some pressure treated 2" x 12" planks under the tires will protect them from ground rot. Sun will age your paint job and rubber. You'd be doing your car a favor to put some kind of cover over it that will shade the car and deflect rain. I have seen canvas "garages" for $200 that would do the trick, although keeping air ...


4

Sand down the paint around the hole, apply a few layers of zinc spray followed by a few layers of new paint (with primer, if necessary) with 1 or 2 layers of clearcoat on top. Make sure you cover the edges well and check the edge regularly to see if any rust occurs. Make sure you wait long enough between each layer for optimal protection, check the label ...


4

Try to remove as much rust as possible with either a die grinder or other rotary device with a wire wheel. Then just use some rust paint to spray over them. You don't even have to take them off the car if you don't want to. Honestly you could even skip the wire wheel if you are feeling really lazy but you may have to respray them every 6 months depending on ...


4

The photo you have added is not of Chrome rims. Chrome rims are a lot harder and can be cleaned with what you've suggested. Aluminium rims are a lot softer and easily get stains though they don't get the actual rust(mostly). I have similar stains on my Ford and was able to get rid of it after 2-3 iterations of Armour-All Wheel cleaner. I think any decent ...


4

Remove the rust! Paint won't do much good on top of rust, and it won't last either. There are some chemicals you can spray on rusted surfaces, but I think sanding is generally best. I just tackled this project with my car. For small areas, sandpaper will work for removing rust. For larger areas (which I had), a flap wheel sander with a cordless drill was ...


4

It's not required that you replace your brake rotors at the same time you replace your brake pads, but there are many reasons why it's highly recommended. Primarily, it's not the rust you should worry about, there most likely always going to be some rust around the edges, that's not at all out of the ordinary. The main problem is that your rotors are most ...


4

One time-honored method is to rub the chromed parts vigorously with alumin(i)um foil. That results in the transfer of alumin(i)um ions to the steel surface, further protecting the surface. WD-40 is a lousy, horrible corrosion prevention agent. If you can get it to last for longer than about 24 hours, you're doing well. It does do some jobs very very well... ...


3

I believe that you can do that, but you're probably better off buying a properly formulated anti-rust product such as 'Waxoil' or similar. These can either be sprayed or brushed onto the underside of the car depending on the product in question.


3

I've had very good results with Nevr-Dull - Magic Wadding Polish. It will take a bit more work to clean your wheels than CLR (or some other corrosive) but is probably safer for the wheels, and avoids the potential damage that steel wool might cause.


3

This Automotive Touch Up Video demonstrates how you can take care of scratches in your paint. In addition, I've had good luck with Napa's Rust Permatex Treatment. It turns rust into a gray primer, which might look a little ugly but not as much as a rusted-out car. You could use the Napa Rust Treatment to get rid of the rust and then try the techniques ...


3

I decided to go ahead trying to repair it, and I'm happy with the results. After bending the rusted metal back into shape, I started out using 40-grit sandpaper and a Dremel with a rust removal brush to remove paint and the brittle rust. Then I applied rust converter to what remained to prevent it from spreading. For reconstructing the rusted-out part of ...


3

Do not put your bare hand over the tailpipe, it will get burnt. If you cannot hear an exhaust leak, puff puffing, you can pressurise the exhaust system with a rag over the tailpipe to make an exhaust leak more pronounced and tracible. The downside to this is that you can destroy the catalytic converter, so it is really not a good idea to do it. The way ...


3

Sadly, I have a lot of experience with this exactly situation. We're not quite as deep into the Salt Belt as PA but still.... Will be removing at least some heat shielding ... For this part of the task, the most important tool that you need is replacement bolts. Those little heat shield bolts are the absolute worst: they're cheap metal holding other ...


3

Rotor replacement is normally done when the rotor can no longer be resurfaced and still fall within the acceptable thickness range. The acceptable thickness range is based on stock brake pads though, so if you're using more aggressive aftermarket pads you may have to do replacement rotors sooner than is specified. That rust on the edge doesn't concern me ...


3

If you want the job done right, then yes: grinding, filling, sanding, priming, and spraying are your best option. There are alternatives out there. Duplicolor makes color matched kits which allows you to paint in the smaller chips (it has an abrasive, color paint brush, then a clear coat to go over the top). I haven't used them, but the product looks like a ...


2

I would be hesitant to make a raised platform using wood. Keep in mind even a very light car is around 3000 lbs, the last thing you really want to do is park your car and have the front wheels go right through that platform. The wood wouldn't be a bad idea to help kill the weeds (though weed killer would have worked pretty well also). I'm in the same ...


2

That looks pretty bad - typically when I've seen ones get this corroded, they need to be sandblasted clear of rust, properly filled and then repainted. You should be able to keep sanding until all the rust is gone - if that leaves holes, you're better off knowing about them rather than having them hidden under rust. If the holes are too big, you can always ...



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