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4

Part of the projector design requires a specific bulb shape and type to work effectively (and legally - most countries require the beam pattern to meet regulations!) Using a D4S in an adapter would not give you the correct pattern, so I would definitely not recommend doing it! I did look online to see if I could find adapters, just in case someone was ...


4

I answered this same question here: Kia Soul aftermarket headlights bottom line: HID retrofit = bad idea unless your projectors are made for them. You WILL blind oncoming drivers. If HID is an option from the factory for the Sebring, I would get those housings rather than retrofitting your existing halogen setup. Here is a good (though exhaustive) read ...


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Similarly to NoCarrier, I answered a similar question on Upgrading a Jeep Wrangler to HID lights. In my experience, those HID lights that "blind you" are the ones done aftermarket and I don't believe they're legal. If your friend has a factory kit, you will likely notice that the lights have a very strong cut-off point, they really only illuminate the road ...


3

If the injectors are fired electrically(which they most likely are), you could wire in a voltage-switch to the injectors, so that it is closed when the injector is fired. This would allow you to measure the time spent open, and do a little math based on the flow-rate of the injector to get a calculated measurement of the fuel injected into the system. If ...


2

It is possible, but it needs a lot of work and probably has to be done by a professional. First, you need to get the automatic panel with the LED screen. Then you need to change lots of wirings and stuff. The most difficult part is changing the air outlets. On the manual models the air outlets (the ones you use to let the air from outside in you car) are ...


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If you have a complete donor car, it is by far easier to swap it out than to retrofit. If the donor car doesn't have an engine in it, level of difficulty goes up exponentially. This is due to not knowing where everything is/was/should be. Also, you'll be on an expedition in parts finding. You'd need to find the right AC compressor, lines, & pulleys which ...


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If there is an Agila model with aircon, chances are most of the fittings are in place already (it's cheaper to have one common platform). It's quite a job actually though. Plus you'll need to install a new pulley belt. It's not impossible, but if you have the money and don't care about the learning experience, have someone else do it.


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Typically if the car you drive was available with ABS and you are able to locate a car otherwise identical to yours at a scrap yard then the cost will be considerably less than ordering the parts new. However, only if you have the tools available, somewhere to do the work and the skills needed would you be able to make the conversion economically viable. ...


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Not sure if this helps, but for BMW Z3s they made a kit that allowed for you to just basically plug it in. I installed one once, and remember the kit costing like a couple of hundred bucks. I recommend going to dealership, get estimate, and then see if it has a part number you can cross reference for the kit to see if there are cheaper options online, or ...



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