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10

This is the sort of thing where one should let common sense prevail¹. Based on my experience, a thorough job will keep track of the following aspects: storage - ensuring that the part isn't misplaced when it's time to put everything back together location - where that screw/bolt/nut/washer/grommet/O-ring is supposed to go sequence - the order of ...


7

One trick I've used before is to draw an outline of the part on a sheet of paper, then push the screws/bolts through the paper in the right places - this does both the association with the part and with the location, useful for things with different length bolts... Another trick, as per Zaid's comment, is to use sandwich bags, which can be labelled as to ...


4

If they say it is unnecessary, I'd put them in the complete idiot category. Will the car run? Most probably, but it has a large propensity to cause issues down the road. With that said, there are some caveats we could talk about. Was the car prepped to stand that long? If the car was filled to the gills with gas, then had 2x Stabil put into the tank ...


4

From Hot Rod magazine: Mini-tubbing is the act of widening a car's rear wheelwells, moving the inner halves inboard to the location of the stock frame-rails to achieve maximum tire clearance without major frame hacking. It's a mod that dates back to the early '60s and has mostly been used for drag racing... More here: http://www.hotrod.com/how-to/paint-...


2

It's more than likely the clear coat, and not rust. Here's why. Temperature change is one factor. The clear coat can sometimes expand differently than the base coat. Areas where snow get piled on can be a factor, as well as sections that get heated frequently, ie. hood. Acid rain can breakdown the chemical bonds, and the above separation can occur. "...


1

i prefer the IKEA way. you may have tons of screws but the actual number of screw types will be far less (to keep manufacturing costs as low as possible). Number the types, group the screws by type and stick numbered label on every single screw hole. The other method for very small screws: draw a sketch of the parts on paper and stick the screws on the ...


1

A quick and dirty way to avoid tracking every fastener individually is to mark the common fasteners & locations with a paint pen. 1/4"-20 x 1-1/2" (Let's say this is common in your case) bolts get a dab of paint and IN the hole for identification later. Other uncommon fasteners should be more obvious. If the job is particularly complex, blend this ...



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