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30

If you have one available, use a trickle-charger to bring the battery back up slowly, instead of jump-starting it. Check the tires. They are probably pretty low at this point. See if they are dry rotted (all cracked and ready to wear quickly). Check all of the fluids in the typical way. Note that it's okay if the oil shows a little low since it's not warm ...


16

As has already been noted, anything rubber will have perished and will need replacing, as will all the fluids and any other normal perishable items (brakes, battery, filters etc). The brakes will have siezed on, and depending how dry the garage was, the interior may have mould and the bodyshell may have gone rusty... The biggest risk, however, is that the ...


10

This is the sort of thing where one should let common sense prevail¹. Based on my experience, a thorough job will keep track of the following aspects: storage - ensuring that the part isn't misplaced when it's time to put everything back together location - where that screw/bolt/nut/washer/grommet/O-ring is supposed to go sequence - the order of ...


8

If the gas didn't wasn't treated, then it will be broken down. That means a gummy varnish substance everywhere, but most critically in the carburetor/fuel injector. That may stop the engine from starting, or at least make it run badly. If you can get the engine to start, you can use a product like Sea Foam (http://www.seafoamsales.com/). Their instructions ...


8

My dad actually brought back a truck (big type semi) from a condition like this - it had a manual transmission but we did the maintenance stuff, replace belts, oil, lubricants etc. THEN we hooked up a chain, put it in gear and proceeded to drag it (tow) (in gear) for a while (a half hour to an hour?) at a slow speed - this allowed the engine to be fully ...


8

I'd say there are many pros and cons for newer and older as a starter (I went older, 84 Nissan 300ZX Turbo). Newer (lets say 15 years or newer so we are talking about 1996+ which should have ODB2) Pros OEM Parts Availability More Cars in Junk Yard to pull parts from (dependent on production numbers, but still more than older models) Less wear and tear ...


7

One trick I've used before is to draw an outline of the part on a sheet of paper, then push the screws/bolts through the paper in the right places - this does both the association with the part and with the location, useful for things with different length bolts... Another trick, as per Zaid's comment, is to use sandwich bags, which can be labelled as to ...


7

If you are in a high humidity area, I would: Coat the part in WD-40 (at least pieces which are made of or have exposed metal pieces). Put them into a large Zip Lock Style Vacuum Storage bag along with ~six oxygen absorbers Vacuum out the storage bag Place bag on the shelf and leave it alone. You may want to put something around the part so any sharp ...


7

You are looking for a mask to filter particulates, an N95 HEPA mask or should be sufficient, they are usually pink or purple in color. You are correct that a dust mask is insufficient. If you have a beard, or as I do just think these are more comfortable then you can use a PAPR (pronounced papper) or Powered Air Purifying Respirator. Here are some examples ...


5

Hi to those starting engines which have been sitting "idle" for more than three months. We recently started a 190e Benz which had not been started for more than 6 months. First step was to check condition and level of all fluids ( engine oil, trans fluid, coolant, power steering, brake fluid and battery acid ). We then checked drive belts and battery ...


5

I want to open with, I'm not really a car guy. I want to add, I haven't worked in a shop in over 25 years. With my lack of qualifications I will submit my opinion. Flat Rate Background Rant Typically, from my experience, flat rate rules the day. Dealerships, shops large and small, use a flat rate methodology to be profitable. This construct is an ...


4

If they say it is unnecessary, I'd put them in the complete idiot category. Will the car run? Most probably, but it has a large propensity to cause issues down the road. With that said, there are some caveats we could talk about. Was the car prepped to stand that long? If the car was filled to the gills with gas, then had 2x Stabil put into the tank ...


4

From Hot Rod magazine: Mini-tubbing is the act of widening a car's rear wheelwells, moving the inner halves inboard to the location of the stock frame-rails to achieve maximum tire clearance without major frame hacking. It's a mod that dates back to the early '60s and has mostly been used for drag racing... More here: ...


4

Firstly, I'm going to asume the bodyshell is sound, as there is no point doing anything if it is rotten (and Volvos of that age can rot very badly) - You'd end up spending hundreds on getting it welded back together... I'll give an idea of prices in Sterling, obviously costs vary depending on where you are... Suspension Creaks and groans are often a ...


4

If you planned on driving this more than once, I would replace all fluids in the car (oil, transmission/clutch, brake, coolant, power steering, etc.) I would then look over all rubber belts and tubes to make sure they are all still in decent condition, if not, replace. Vacuum lines need to be in decent shape also. Once you know your brake system is in ...


3

You'll need to check/replace for all rubber hoses(brakes, power steering, radiator, vacuum,...) as they could have dried and may break under load. Check wiring, they could have corroded or dried and can cause shortcut. Grease parts (Drifeshafts, steering, ...). Get a factory service manual for your specific vehicule and check the maintenance items, they ...


3

To add on to Mikes answer: Next you'll probably find that the carb is full of varnish. (a thick sludge left behind when gasoline sits in a puddle for a long time). You'll probably end up having to disassemble and clean it out, you may need to by a carburetor rebuild kit. (probably) Next, there's a good chance that the rodents have damaged the wiring. ...


3

Remove the spark plug. Squirt some oil into the cylinder,you can use regular motor oil but Liquid Wrench or equivilent would be better. Let it soak overnight.With the bike in neutral see if the motor will spin over using the kickstarter. If it won't turnover the motor is seized. At this point it is not worth repairing but could be a valuble learning tool. ...


3

You've got the right idea. Get an older common car, parts will be cheaper and there will be communities of people to help you. They're easier to work on and learn, no scan tools, not a lot of electronics. As for your grease conversion, I'm not sure that's a good place to start, especially on that car. You need good basic knowledge and experience before ...


3

Let me also suggest that the backfire issue is related to ignition, not the valves. Check your timing, which you said you did statically, and also check to be sure the plug wires are in the proper place on the distributor. Easy to mess that up and it will cause a major odd firing of the engine. the above comments about fluids and tires is also on the money, ...


2

I learned much of what I know on a 1994 Acura Integra when it wasn't new but definitely was less than 10 years old. My advice would be: Start simple: most maintenance tasks are dead boring. Changing oil is not exciting but is very valuable. Know the costs of your mistakes. If I fail to tighten down my oil filter properly, I'm going to have a mess in ...


2

Try these sites, I have done research on several sites and these two kept coming up and they also have video on youtube to show you how to do it. http://superiorrestoration.com/categories/graphics http://www.classicdyeproducts.com/custom_button_graphics They help me repair my 05 Escalade buttons for my Steering Wheel, A/C Control Unit, and Navigation/Radio ...


2

If this is only due to aesthetics, you can use a Scotch-brite pad to remove the excess without chemicals. I take it the engine has not been running yet? If so, the paint is probably not fully cured, so shouldn't be that hard to get off. I would think using chemicals is a bit of overkill for removal. Scotch-brite will take a little bit of elbow-grease, but ...


2

It's more than likely the clear coat, and not rust. Here's why. Temperature change is one factor. The clear coat can sometimes expand differently than the base coat. Areas where snow get piled on can be a factor, as well as sections that get heated frequently, ie. hood. Acid rain can breakdown the chemical bonds, and the above separation can occur. ...


1

i prefer the IKEA way. you may have tons of screws but the actual number of screw types will be far less (to keep manufacturing costs as low as possible). Number the types, group the screws by type and stick numbered label on every single screw hole. The other method for very small screws: draw a sketch of the parts on paper and stick the screws on the ...


1

A quick and dirty way to avoid tracking every fastener individually is to mark the common fasteners & locations with a paint pen. 1/4"-20 x 1-1/2" (Let's say this is common in your case) bolts get a dab of paint and IN the hole for identification later. Other uncommon fasteners should be more obvious. If the job is particularly complex, blend this ...


1

I don't think I'd be very concerned about the "sealing wipe" not drying. As Juann pointed out, your conditions seem to be good for drying, so either it's as dry as it'll get or else something's interfering with it drying. For future reference, you can use ordinary car wax after wet-sanding with 2000-grit sandpaper. The car wax MUST be a "100% carnauba" ...


1

Make sure you have completed all the routine maintenance specified by your owners manual or a repair manual. Specifically Replacing: Belts Spark Plugs, Plug Wires, Distributor, etc. Filters (Air, Fuel, Oil, Transmission Fluid) Drain and fill your Transmission Fluid and Coolant Additionally: When your coolant has been drained, check and possibly ...


1

I've bought a Toyota Land Cruiser 87 with a diesel a couple of month back. I wanted to learn how to wrench. My criteria were: Simple, no electronics Room to work around, I didn't want something too crowded Good online/offline communities(Forums,clubs, vendors) Parts prices and availability The only thing I didn't really follow was the parts price, I ...



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