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29

The decision to replace is largely based on the thickness. The repair manual should tell you the minimum thickness, below which you should replace the rotors when doing the repair. Use a pair of calipers and measure the rotor thickness, if you're below this number you need to replace the rotors. You may also wish to replace the rotors if you have ...


10

There are three cases that cause brake rotors to need to be resurfaced/turned and/or replaced. Gouging of the rotor by the brake pad holding mechanism (the pad were rubbed completely away and the metal holding the pad start digging into the rotor) Warping of the rotor from extreme use (rotor gets too hot and warps upon cooling) The rotor itself wears down ...


7

Wow, I'm in the minority here. It is my firm belief that you should have your rotors turned with every brake pad/shoe replacement! If you do not do this everything will work perfectly fine, until you apply the brakes then if your brake rotors/drums were glazed, heavily scored or worn out of parallel to the new brake pad your will stopping distance WILL be ...


7

A simple test that you can perform in your own driveway is: For each corner of the car, push down hard several times (the car should be bouncing visibly up and down) When pushed down, release and watch The car should bounce upwards (above the normal resting point) and then immediately settle at the resting point. Additional bouncing indicates worn or ...


7

At least in the United States you are not required to use the dealer for service,parts or repairs to maintain your warranty. You will be required to have the warranty work done at the dealer except in extenuating circumstances,(like the nearest dealer is 150 miles away) but you must still contact them first. If they deny a warranty claim on the basis of non ...


7

Let's see if I understand your situation correctly: All of your tires have well over 40000 miles on them. I've never sold a car with brand new tires on it so I'd suspect that those tires are quite old indeed. One of your tires is a Douglas Xtra Trac. It's telling that tire-rack.com doesn't even list this brand for me to refer to its rated mileage. So, ...


5

As Bob says, formal servicing should always follow the manufacturer's schedule - Make sure to take into account any variations suggested for your location/climate/usage pattern. This should include routine things like oil and filter changes, as well as more major, but less frequent things such as timing belts. In terms of more general checks and ...


5

The "fun" part is going to be getting the original bushing out - you might have to cut or burn out the rubber, then cut through the outer metal ring without damaging the arm. You'll also need to build a makeshift tool you can use to press in the new bushing - at the very least, use a socket that matches the out diameter of the bushing and use a vise to ...


5

You can by an engine from the dealer. Call around the price can very dramatically from dealer to dealer. Some of the high volume (parts sales) dealers will sell over the counter for less than a normal dealer would pay for the engine from GM. One of the dealers in my area sells hundreds if not thousands of engines a year. It was cheaper for my dealer to buy ...


5

The Mercedes M103 engine in your 300CE is a proven design, old enough to demonstrate its longevity—lots of them are running around still with 300,000+ miles on them. The head gaskets are pretty much the only serious weak point. If the engine was not burning excessive oil (more than a quart every 5,000 miles) or showing other signs of extreme wear before ...


5

The salvage yard will use an interchange manual. At one time it was a large series of books but is now a computer program. Each major and some not so major component of a vehicle was given a number. The number is then cataloged and all vehicles that use the same part are listed. When I have doubts I'll check several on line sources of parts. If one source ...


4

In my experience, Polyurethane bushes last longer than standard rubber ones, as the plastic doesn't perish in the same way that rubber does. As you mention, there is a price to this, as they are generally harder than the equavalent OEM bushes, however many manufacturers offer a variety of stiffnesses, depending on the intended use - some of the softest ones ...


4

It depends specifically on what's wrong with the starter. Sometimes you hear a clicking sound when you turn the key but the starter motor gears don't actually turn. This could actually be due to a weak battery, but if you know the battery has a full charge, then it could be the starter gears actually failing to turn. You may hear a whining sound, ...


4

If it runs out of fluid it will need to be replaced, because it will destroy itself rapidly (probably preceded by a loud grinding noise). In the meantime, as long as there is sufficient gear oil to wet the gears it will be fine. As for severity, it is common for differentials to develop a "seep" around the front seal where the drive-shaft connects, or the ...


4

The short answer is that you should always be guided by the maintenance schedule by the calendar set forth in your owner's manual. It will have a detailed calendar based on your usage profile and setting forth major items based on miles or dates, depending on what's most appropriate. Using my car as an example, there's a moderately major service required ...


4

I'd like to preface my answer by saying that I think the OP has asked an interesting theoretical question that deserves a theoretical/hypothetical discussion. In no way should the following be taken as an indication that removing/installing batteries carries low risk of explosion. Take precautions when working around vehicle batteries. The risk of hydrogen ...


4

The piece I believe you are talking about the linkage. Many times the bushings will wear out and the linkage will pop off of the arm or motor. Here's a drawing which depicts a typical linkage connection: EDIT: I just noticed in this picture, it looks as though the Right Hand Link attaches at the wiper arm ... it really doesn't. It fits on the ball which ...


3

The tools to do it yourself can all be rented. The job can be difficult and even hazardous depending on the route you take to do it. You can do full strut/spring changes by buying the "quick change" strut assemblies. Or, you can disassemble the strut assembly to only replace the bad parts (commonly the strut and the bearing/top plates). That requires ...


3

I doubt your sensor requires soldering. I would recommend always going with OEM parts, as they ensure the values the sensor sends are accurate. Next, verify which sensor it is as some cars have 4 and are divided into banks (sides). The code should say which side you are looking at. The sensor itself might need a special socket, but that is not necessarily ...


3

Batteries give off the most hydrogen while charging or discharging so an idle disconnected battery probably isn't in danger of exploding. If you are connecting a battery to a vehicle the risk is pretty low because the battery shouldn't be producing hydrogen. If you are connecting jumpers to another vehicle's battery there is a higher risk because there could ...


3

I'll preface this by saying I have never changed this bulb in a Camry before ... with that said, the replacement bulb should be a 194 or 168 or 2825 (different numbers for same basic bulb). It looks something like this: Here are the steps I found at this site: 1) First you want to remove base from roof liner. There are 2 clips in the rear...2 in ...


2

I don't believe in turning rotors anymore. If they're too thin, replace. Warped, replace (probably warped from heat, and if you warped them before, they're going to warp even faster as they get thinner). Grooves, as long as they're not deep, the pads and rotor will come to agree with each other pretty quick. Deep grooves, replace the rotor.


2

O.K as a mechanic for over 35 yrs. I strongly reccomend resuracing.even if the rotors look fine It's a matter of cost. if they are the "slip over hub"type the cost of new rotors are relitivly cheaplike 28 bucks each with that said peace of mind for under 100 is well worth it. New pads are ceramic and much tougher than metalic to "break in"


2

Along with the already mentioned and more common reasons of Gouges, Warped or being too thin there is another reason for getting them turned/resurfaced. When using some higher quality brake pads, they will tell you if you are changing from one pad compound to another (either changing brands or product lines) to use new or re-surfaced rotors. This comes ...


2

Parts stores take a deposit when you don't have the old part, and refund you the deposit when you return the core. Since you didn't give them a deposit, I doubt very seriously they will give you any money for it. You may want to try an axle re-builder in your area, CV axles are easy to rebuild and a lot of cites have local re-builders, they may be willing to ...


2

I am showing that vehicle to already take these halogen bulbs. If you have sealed beams and you want to upgrade the lights you can try for example Hella Lights.


2

Panels like that are usually removed after removing the head unit. I'm guessing from the picture that it is an aftermarket unit, so you should be able to get an appropriate removal tool (these vary according to the make of the head unit) from your local car accessories shop. Use the tool(s) to remove the head unit, and you'll find a metal cage behind it, ...


2

I've search for an online procedure, without success. But looking how the lamp is built, it's looks like you have 2 bracket on each side of the lamp. Unless you can access it from behind the bumper (which I doubt), you'll need to remove the bumper. If unsure, maybe take some pictures of your setup and update your original post with them. Here's one image of ...


2

Just did the front struts on wife's '95 Camry (V-6). Bought the quick-strut combo (Springs, struts, mounting plates, bushings, etc., no spring-compressing required) for $80 ea. on ebay. After you get the wheel off there's two bolts at the bottom (22 mm), and three nuts on top (easy to see with the hood up), and a bolt for the brake line. Piece of cake. ...


2

tl;dr: If you haven't done this sort of work before, I would NOT recommend that you try this on your own. I'm specifically wondering if these amounts sound reasonable (about $455 to $600); if anyone has ideas on how to get a better price on the job; and whether with a standard set of tools (the kind that a very casual handyman would have) and ...



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