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0

Not with the methods you mention. Drilling holes in it either side of a split and using cable ties is a good way to repair it. Leave at least an inch of distance from the split so there is enough plastic for strength. Glue/epoxy/etc won't last 5 minutes.


2

Fill the area with foamy shaving cream. Do all your gasket work, etc, and then vacuum out the area with a shop vac. wipe off any areas the shop vac can't get to. Rinse away any residue with fresh motor oil. The tiny bit of shaving cream residue going into the oil return passages will not be a big deal. I would change the oil and filter soon after such a ...


6

Yes, debris will cause damage, however the valves cover gasket doesn't stick that hard and if it is the original, they come with some kind of rubber material, very easy to take out even in one piece almost always. Some gaskets are made of cork material, those would break but still won't generate much debris neither. The tip is: take time, warm up the engine ...


3

Any debris will cause abrasive damage: the bigger the debris, the bigger and quicker the damage will be. Other than being careful, you can always cover up the engine if you are working in a dirty, dusty or drafty area. Changing the motor oil after your post-repair test drive is one way to mitigate the dust-sized debris.


1

Worst case scenario: Very carefully grind the bolt head off then slide the head up the bolt. Once the head is out of the way, remove with a stud remover or weld a new nut to it. To do this, first make the head as accessible as possible. You can rotate the cams a bit carefully if a lobe is in the way, just be sure you don't have valve interference (...


21

You take 2 nuts and put them on the same set of threads. Then lock them against each other by loosening the lower nut and tightening the upper nut. Then use the upper nut with your torque wrench to install the stud.


2

You need a clutch basket removal tool This tool will allow the inner and outer clutch basket to become locked together in order for you to remove the bolt that is affixed to your transmission primary shaft. This is a relatively cheap tool. I recommend you use an air impact to remove the bolt. Upon tightening you will want to use a torque wrench and ...


0

The best way I know of to remove a bolt like this is to use a ratchet with (preferably) an impact 6 point socket. Put it on the bolt and hit the ratchet with a large hammer. One or two good solid hits will often times break it loose. You can also hit the head of the bolt with the hammer, just a couple of taps, not hard swings can also help loosen it. Do NOT ...


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This is the kind of question that is hard to answer, there are so many possibilities and they depend on the amount and type of sludge and the specific alternator and the phase of the moon and how long the sludge has been there and on and on. If the source who suggested cleaning it seems credible, then your odds are better… It is possible that the alternator ...


2

I used the 2-part putty stick to repair the leaking tank on my 1968 Firebird, while it was actively leaking. I backed into a parking stop and bumped the tank, when it shifted a bit it caused pinholes where the support strap was contacting the tank. I was young and broke, so I never had a chance to replace the tank. The putty repair lasted 1 1/2 years until I ...



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