Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

The short answer is that yes, you can change your differential to optimize fuel efficiency. CAVEAT: it is almost certainly not worth it. Here's a very high level discussion of why there are better ways to achieve the same goal (better fuel efficiency): Think about how the air-fuel mixture in the engine is managed: for each revolution of the engine, a unit ...


5

If it runs out of fluid it will need to be replaced, because it will destroy itself rapidly (probably preceded by a loud grinding noise). In the meantime, as long as there is sufficient gear oil to wet the gears it will be fine. As for severity, it is common for differentials to develop a "seep" around the front seal where the drive-shaft connects, or the ...


3

If you look at the side of the differential housing you will find a plug fitting.The fitting looks similar to an allenhead bolt but it has a four sided hole that a 1/2 ratchet extension will fit into.Remove the plug insert your finger straight in the hole.If it has oil in it the level is ok.If you can't feel any oil you need to fill it to the level of the ...


2

You should use what your manual specifically says, not the guy at the auto parts store. Nick C's answer in most situations will probably be correct, that it is just more expensive with more stuff in it that won't apply to your diff and not hurt anything. However, depending on your specific differential, those additional items could cause problems. As a ...


2

First, as a fellow NA MX5 owner I would simply replace the diff with a Torsen LSD out of an NA 1.8 MX5 and be done with it. It's the most cost effective swap I'm aware of if you actually do need an LSD. Plus it's a fairly strong LSD anyway so unless you're planning to put silly power through it, it should last. That said, the difference between the LSD ...


2

As far as I remember, rear diffs and the viscous centre diff are known problem areas on the Freelander. If you remove the rear diff, the viscous centre diff will attempt to compensate for what it believes is a permanent no-grip condition at the rear wheels. Chances are that you'll blow up the centre diff in very short order if you do that. So no, I wouldn't ...


2

You need to find the RPO (Regular Production Options) list on the Service Parts Identification label. Similar to what is pictured below. It will likely be on the spare tire cover or the glove box, but may also be in the door jam or under some other compartment lid. Each on of those three digit number/letters indicates an option the car is equipped with on ...


2

If you have any doubt at all that the RPO code sticker is accurate (like, maybe someone swapped the rear differential), you can tell an ordinary open diff from an LSD by jacking up the rear end of the car, releasing the parking brake, and turning each rear wheel in turn, leaving the other one free to turn by itself. With an open differential, the opposite ...


1

As Larry said, look for the RPO codes. The code you are looking for the Limited Slip option is G80. Look here for a list of RPO codes specific to your CTS.


1

With most vehicles of the rear wheel or four wheel type this would invole crawling under the vehicle or raising it onto service ramps/jackstands.The plug would be removed and an object inserted in the hole (a little finger works well for this)to see if the differential fluid is even with the bottom of the plug hole,if oil gets on your finger the level is ...


1

Detroit lockers aren't the most streetable differentials, but they should be a little easier to deal with than what you're describing. Two things: 1- That's a lot of play in your driveshaft and it sounds like too much to be incorrectly set backlash in the ring and pinion gear. Are your u-joints and carrier bearing (if you have one) ok? While you're checking ...


1

If your limited slip differential has started to mis-behave then you really should take remedial action, it has become dangerous by virtue of being unpredictable, and it can only get worse. Depending on age and mileage you are looking at a replacement unit. You pays your money and you take your choice of which one. Overhauling a high mileage unit piecemeal ...


1

It could be any part of the driveline. A dry U joint may be binding. Have you noticed a squeek at very low speeds or when shifting from forward to reverse? Most differentials are pretty robust. If the differential came with posi-traction a fluid change may ease some of the symptoms. I believe these differentials didnot come with a drain you have to remove ...


1

If you car is well used in harsh climates, the catalytic converter may be hard to remove. Are the bolts all rusty? Try loosening one--will it budge easily? Exhaust parts tend to be annoying to remove if the car is old enough. Otherwise, if it's clean and comes off easily there's no other risk in messing with the cat. This is not unheard of on front wheel ...


1

I have used GL-5 in my rear differential for the past ten years and driven over 100,000 miles. I just did a R&R with new GL-5 as recommended by manufacturer. When I examined the old GL-5 , I found no metal flakes in the old as far as I can tell. I recommend following manufacturer recommnedation. No need to try new stuff.


1

From what I can tell, Limslip oil is designed for vehicles with limited slip differentials, and thus has extra additives over a normal hypoid gear oil. Hypoid oils have additives to help them cope under extreme pressure, but as limited slip diffs still have hypoid gears in, I would assume limslip oil also has the same additives. I suspect, therefore, that ...


1

The pinion seal is most likely bad. Assuming this is a Ford 9" rear end... You'll need to remove the driveshaft yoke to replace it (the piece your driveshaft bolts to on the third member). You shouldn't have to remove the third member to replace the seal either. Just remember when you reinstall the nut adjusts the preload on the pinion, so you can't ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible