New answers tagged

1

Optimal engine temperature is about 190-210. Running cold leads to higher fuel consumption and increased wear. You want the engine temperature to be at least 165* F (~74* C). Rather than having the fan run 100% of the time, it would be better to have it connected to a switch inside the cabin. This way you can turn it on once the temperature starts to get ...


1

I concur with Ducatikillers answer. But would suggest a pressure test of your cooling system. Check with auto part stores , they may be able to test your system, or possibly loan a pressure tester.


6

They may not have bled your cooling system properly As a possibility, if you had air trapped in your cooling system it would expand as the engine approached operating temperature. It would eventually, hopefully, make it's way into your radiator where the air would get released into the overflow tank by a valve that opens with higher pressures. As the ...


3

A bit of inspiration can be had from either the Yamaha or Kawasaki side by sides. If you have the time and inclination, go to your neighborhood Yamaha or Kawie dealership (they might be the same one), and speak to someone in the service department. In all reality, your coolant system needs to maintain a certain pressure, a pressure tester can be used. ...


1

This can be caused by being low on refrigerant. Before the refrigerant enters the expansion valve next to the evaporator, the refrigerant needs to be in liquid form so that it can expand and perform its cooling function. There needs to be a continuous supply of liquid from the condenser to ensure that refrigerant in gas form does not reach the evaporator. ...


3

There are two answers to this question: Theoretically, radiators are completely optional on engines. Air cooled engines have existed for a very long time. The function of the radiator on these engines is replaced by cooling fins to extract the heat and release it into the air, and they also have oil coolers as well to carry out the heat. However, if your ...


3

I would check the water pump, it sounds like the blades may have corroded away. From your description it certainly sounds like the water isn't circulating.


3

I'm in general agreement with Ben. Cooling fan not working. The description of high vehicle speed = okay and low speed not means your fan isn't working for you. This could be a problem with fan controller, fan motor or temp sender used to turn on fan. Note, the fan shrouds matter big! Ensure they are sealed off to radiator correctly. Please check the ...


0

The question I could do myself would be if that oil on radiator could'nt be the consequence of a damaged head gasket which pours oil from lubrication system to the cooling one (then, the guys could have improvised along the way any bad or worse excuse). Of course, I've purchased 4 2nd hand cars, and I would have rejected any candidate which had oid in the ...


1

As oil has a higher viscosity than water, I think it could damage the water pump because it would put more stress on it. Also, the oil would flow slower than water and this could lead to overheating of the engine.


1

Have into account two factors: oil viscosity may be much or very much higher than the antifreeze fluid (glicol-polipropylene derivates) normally used: the radiator grille has capilare-thickness tubes and an hydraulic circuit (pump, filter, reservoir...) prepared for much less viscosity. Furthermore, the oil will becoming more and more viscose while the ...


3

Strange - engine coolant is antifreeze diluted with water. So the seller is claiming he had oil but not water? I would not buy that car. For the seller, a coolant system flush would in order, both forwards and reverse, and then refill with antifreeze and clean water. If engine oil still appears in the coolant water then the oil is moving from the oil ...


10

Yes, it's possible some of the seals designed to withstand water and glycol could get damaged I am thinking you are creating a fictitious scenario here, so I'll roll with it. If you filled your radiator with oil and started your car and let it run for awhile I would be most concerned with damage to seals that were designed to withstand water and glycol. ...


1

I consider it quite more likely that it was the engine that had been putting oil into the coolant. Of course, it may also be that the seller poured some obvious additional oil on top in order to mask the defective motor seal, a very expensive defect to fix.


21

The seller should not be selling the vehicle with oil in the cooling system. That supposed "quick fix" should have been rectified at the earliest opportunity. Have him flush the cooling system and put another few tens of kilometers on the odometer before you even consider such a vehicle. If the seller is topping off the radiator with oil instead of water, ...


22

I would be more concerned about whether engine oil is actually finding its way into the radiator from the engine. If it is, this would be indicative of a compromised head gasket, warped cylinder head, or damaged oil cooler (if the car uses radiator coolant for cooling the oil). The first two items are not trivial to replace or fix. The third one isn't far ...


2

I run an enormous race radiator with high flow spal fans, an oil cooler and an oil cooler fan and it keeps the coolant and oil at exactly 180-185F around town or on the highway, regardless of ambient temperature, even if I run the fans unnecessarily. Why doesn't it overcool? Thermostats. It 100 percent doesn't matter how much radiator you run so long as ...


2

Only based on your question. The answer is yes. You can run an engine without radiator. You just need to find an alternative way of keeping it coolor you will end breaking it. It's not immediate, but once the engine warms too much it will break. There are many engines that were develop specifically with this purpose in mind and only use the air flow to keep ...


8

It can absolutely be started without a radiator. You will not cause any damage as long as the engine does not overheat. If you don't run it long enough for the engine to get too hot, it's not an issue. To give you an example of how it could be beneficial: I used to own a 94 Camaro Z28. The engine in it was a Gen-II LT1 350. This engine has what's called an ...


10

An engine is a very large thermal mass. When the engine is cold it takes time to warm up. If you only run the engine for 15 to 30 seconds from cold there should be no problem. Running the engine any longer than that may cause the engine to overheat.



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