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18

If the thermostat is operating properly the radiator will only come into play when the thermostat opens, when the engine is at normal operating temperature (around 190 degrees, give or take). Adding a gigantic radiator won't make a bit of difference because if the engine gets too cold, the thermostat will close, causing the engine to heat up again. In the ...


14

In the case where you run it too hot, you could start messing up your head gasket or warping the head itself. If you have to, in a warm climate, use distilled water or just keep replacing the antifreeze until you can get it somewhere, after which you'll have to have the whole system flushed. If you live in a cold climate your engine block could freeze and ...


13

Lets start with the fact that Ford doesn't make anti-freeze, they buy it in. It will have certain specs of course but so does all anti-freeze. It will also be made by one of the major producers of the product. If you can find the Ford specs you could compare it to other brands. Alternatively, contact the makers of different brands of anti-freeze and ask them ...


7

I doubt the fluid is overflowing. You most likely have a leak somewhere. Common locations: The plastic container that you top off has a leak. (Check underneath it for puddles, also make sure the hose between it and the radiator is not leaking). Radiator (Look on the bottom for drips, it is typically behind the grill in front of the engine) Water Pump ...


6

The thinner radiator might make it easier for the cold air to flow through the engine compartment. (The radiator itself wont cool an already cool engine at all if the thermostat is intact.) In cold environments it is often necessary to use a grille cover to limit cold air flow to the engine. Grille covers are especially necessary with small diesel engines ...


6

It depends on how much you are leaking. I've had a leak in a radiator and had to take it somewhere a few times, here's what I usually do. Fill the radiator completely full of water. If you can get it loaded, and it takes more than a few minutes to drain, you can proceed to step two. Drive slower than normal to your destination. Keep a spare gallon of water ...


6

First thing I'd try to figure out is how quickly it leaks - run it, stick your head underneath it as check if there is any visible leaking. If there is, chances are that it's not going to make it for 30 miles. I'd also check for any evidence of oil and water mixing. If there is, don't drive it. If it's not leaking that badly I'd be tempted to top it up with ...


6

Yes, it will. However, your biggest concern is going to be getting enough air flowing over it. Do yourself a favour and go look at the engine bay of a 200x model Subary Impreza WRX. The intercooler is mounted flat on the top of the engine and the characteristic scoop forces air onto it to cool the intake air. The same type of thing might work for your ...


5

Antifreeze is a blend of several different ingredients: the antifreeze/coolant active ingredient, (mostly) water, corrosion inhibitors to prevent the water from rusting away the inside of your engine, and a secret blend of herbs and spices that's particular to each manufacturer. There are several different choices for the active ingredient (ethylene ...


5

The main thing the higher pressure cap will do is to increase the boiling point of the coolant slightly. 3psi isn't going to make a huge difference, but it will make some difference. If your cooling system is in good shape, the higher pressure unlikely to cause problems. If your cooling system is already on the way out, well, then it'll be on the way out a ...


5

I agree with Timo - if it is a big enough leak that you can see it clearly, then getting the car transported is much safer. In general, using water as coolant is OK for a short time or as a "get you home" alternative, but it does not have the anti-freeze and corrosion inhibiting properties of a proper coolant mix, so should not be left in the engine for ...


4

You can see the corrosion on the pipe around the clip - even if Radweld or similar is able to temporarily stop the leak, I doubt that it'll last very long. At the rate that it's leaking, there is bound to be a bunch of fairly sizeable holes corroded into the pipe. For that reason alone I would change out the pipe as soon as I could. If that breaks (worst ...


4

Normally, I would ask first in a comment but that seems to be a privilege not available to new users, so here goes: Are you sure it was the radiator cap and not the overflow bottle? The radiator is usually full and getting 100ml in would be a struggle, not to mention that the green coolant would be staring you in the face. If you radiator wasn't full then ...


4

You need to drain the coolant and replace it. You should follow the instructions in your owners manual. If you don't have one handy, the ehow page is a fairly general set of instructions but it'll get you into the right general location for the coolant drain. Keep in mind, engine coolant is toxic and should be disposed of properly. This is a perfectly ...


4

I can't speak for GM, but one reason they may be doing it is that they have a reputation for overheating under heavy use (heavy towing on the trucks and track days for the cars) amongst motorsports enthusiasts. Bumping it up a few psi is relatively safe for the cars and may well be enough to help keep the overheating under control.


4

With the improvements in modern antifreeze I rarely see radiator failures. Not that they don't happen, just no where near as often they did years ago. I think the crimped seal is more resistant to fatigue failure then the older brazed tanks were. Since aluminum can be expensive to shape and weld I am sure the reason for the change was a cost savings issue. ...


3

Firstly, you don't mention what car you have, which can help with diagnosis as we may be able to point you towards known issues with certain models. Bent or missing fins will cause the radiator to work less efficiently than normal, but that sounds like a fairly small area, so shouldn't be causing you a major problem. It is probably worth flushing the ...


3

Hopefully your mechanic would pressure test the water pump before replacing it to determine if it's really bad. Having no heat is usually a symptom of a stuck open thermostat, but if that was the case, your temp gauge would not indicate hot...maybe a clogged heater core? Did your heater core get flushed? That wouldn't explain the temp gauge reading hot, ...


3

Here's a thread from honda-tech.com. Sounds like you should have one from the factory, but it's possible an aftermarket thermostat housing was installed minus the valve. If you really have no bleeder, you could install a thermostat housing that has one, or pull yours and install one yourself. Otherwise, you're on the right track, though you might try ...


3

As long as you don't mix the two coolants together you should not have any problem. I run "green" coolant in my GM that came with Dexcool, and have been for more than 5 years. You do want to check the ratio of coolant and water as straight coolant (or too much compared to water) will not cool as well. To answer your question I wouldn't bother switching, if ...


3

It's likely non-repairable, unless the vehicle is 15 years + old. The new style radiators are not cost effective to repair. A leak between the tank and the core, can usually be repaired, a leaking tank can usually be replaced. Core repair is difficult if possible, they are made so thin now it's next to impossible to repair. Check with a radiator repair shop ...


3

Late model Taurus do use a special coolant (usually orangish) which, unlike the standard biennial flush and change, is only serviced at around 90,000 miles or the kilometric equivalent. Use of common antifreezes (green and blue) will do damage. Use the recommended Ford coolant in the Taurus. You might have been advised to go to Ford for the obvious reason ...


3

Without a wind tunnel the only way to tell is by monitoring the temperature gauge. Air flow/cooling capacity can get complex as there are many variables. Thing to consider are engine size, radiator capacity/effiency, fan size and direction of airflow all of which are influenced by each other and air flow over and around the vehicle at different speeds. If ...


3

My garage found a small amount of dried coolant on my radiator and block heater and tell me that I needed to replace my radiator, block heater, and hose urgently, as it could leak at any moment. In order for there to be coolant residue on the outside of places that it should inside that is clear indication that there is or was a leak. Also, seeing the ...


3

The bigger question here is, what are you actually gaining? The dimensions of the Envoy radiator is only marginally bigger than the current one. Your question, "Will it work?" is rather irrelevant. The pertinent question here should be, "Will it work better?" ... The answer to this is most probably No. You need to find another radiator which is the same ...


2

The piece missed from your question - you seem to have assumed the reason the mechanic told you to go to a Ford dealer was because of the antifreeze. A possible alternative is that only the Ford dealership is licenced to drain and refill your radiator - there may be warranties. (I know, it doesn't answer the headline question, but may still be the correct ...


2

I wouldn't use additives to plug a leak unless it's an emergency. That stuff migrates all through your cooling system gunking up everything it can in the process - including radiator tubes with a partial flow restriction... If you are fortunate enough to possess a brass radiator - take it to a rad shop to have the leak soldered. At the same time, get it ...


2

The overheating is likely caused by a non-working fan. When you are speeding, the air you run into cools it, but in traffic the radiator experiences no flow. As far as the coolant, you can have it flushed with the DexCool again, but personally I run BMWs blue coolant in my S10... So the coolants all work the same, and Chevrolet just prefers the red. ...


2

Turns out it doesn't have a radiator drain plug. To flush the coolant you have to remove the bottom radiator hose. As for the plastic bolts on the splash guard, if you mangle them enough you can slip the splash-guard off of one of them and then pivot it around the second and out of the way. I used a flat-head screwdriver to pry one of the bolts slightly ...


2

The overflow is a possibility if you are overheating or do not have the proper mixture of antifreeze and water causing the fluid to boil creating excessive pressure and evacuating the system. Water alone has a boiling point of 100C/212F. The addition of antifreeze to the mixture alters this boiling point (and lowers the freezing point, hence the name ...



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