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Your window motor and/or regulator is going out. What happens is, the window motors have a thermal trip which tells them to stop when they get too hot. As a vehicle gets older, the window regulator and slides don't slide/move as well, so creates a lot more friction. The window motor starts wearing out because of this and more heat is produced, thus shutting ...


2

What I've found in several of these is that the motor itself is fine, but it's internal thermal fuse goes bad (becomes higher resistance giving less voltage to the motor). I've even replaced the thermal fuse for a couple bucks and the motors then work like new. I wouldn't recommend doing this unless you are familiar with soldering and electronics.


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You can apply car wax to the top/side weatherstrip - frost won't stick to wax. I don't like the fact that it automatically energizes the window, though; I've seen an awful lot of window bottom weatherstrips destroyed when heavily frosted windows were rolled down further than about 1/8". You live in a climate very similar to my own, too. You may be forced to ...


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I got it worked out. I hadn't realized there were pins sticking out of the bottom of the window into the lift plate - window had to be moved laterally (and pretty forcefully), not just up. A mechanic in my area took 5 minutes to come out and help me in his parking lot and figured it out. Props to Auto Doctor in Crofton, MD, for anyone in this area.


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Side windows are tempered glass. They are made to shatter into a million pieces (as you just found out). All it takes is pressure in the right place in the right direction to have it shatter. Can it being off track cause this? I would assume there was just enough stress in the right place and that's all she wrote. I had shut a car door once with the window ...


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Put some WD-40 onto a rag and wipe the seal area with it. The "WD" stands for water displacement. When applied, it will keep the moisture off of the seal so there will be nothing there to freeze to the window.


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First, I'd like to try to clarify this whole situation a little. Your car has two keys, correct? An ignition key and an antitheft key that fits a special keyhole in the shifter, which manually permits the shifter to be shifted out of (P)ark without using the ignition key? As you drove home, you noticed a loss of power to the dash lights and power windows, ...


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It sounds like your ignition switch is bad, and needs to be replaced. This is a common failure on Civics of that age, particularly on higher mileage cars. A replacement switch is around $70 from a local parts store, and can take a couple of hours to replace, depending on experience and familiarity with the portions of the car that need to be removed to ...


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Many vehicles equipped with remote keys have a "hidden" feature in which the windows roll down when the unlock button is pressed for a few seconds. It may be that the unlock button is stuck and causes your windows to roll down. If this is the case, the windows should not roll down if you use a different, working remote or if the suspect remote is far away ...


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The cheapest, easiest thing you can try is to disconnect your battery for 30 minutes (check your owner's manual for the proper way of doing this). When you connect the battery again, your electric windows would have reset their soft limits (so called because the SOFTware learns what "fully open" and "fully closed" "feels" like). You'll notice that your ...



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