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6

If the open one is still on the track, it may stay up if you can get it get back up and pull the fuse the windows are on. If it's partially off the track (one of the rollers has popped out) or the mechanism and / or motor are really shot, you might have to pull off the door panel and rig something up to keep it in place until you can fix it or have it ...


4

If there was a weakness or chip, the slight bending placed on a pane of glass by turning could be enough to shatter it. When you turn a corner in any car there is flex in the chassis - usually this wouldn't be enough to cause any problems though, as there is rubber holding the window in place and this should flex enough, so I can only assume something had ...


4

Based on your wiring diagram, the relay is inside the switch, and based on that it's not serviceable. Based on the picture you posted here That black square box on the switch (tyco) is the relay. Here is are the specs (PDF) Here is a where you can buy it Based on that I would say it's replaceable, with some soldering required. It would take some ...


4

If you have checked another working window, your best bet is to use a multimeter to see which wire carries what voltage for the up and down signals (this is not specific to your cart but relevant for any). Then check first to see whether the voltage is present at the motor end of the wire. If so, the connection to the motor may be faulty. If no voltage ...


4

I have had the same issue three times with two different vehicles. Check out www.shimjim.com for a temporary fix. It is a rubber wedge that inserts between the window and the inside window trim. James


4

In this case, as the reset procedure requires the motor to turn freely through between 6 and 10 revolutions - without being connected to the window mechanism etc. you prehaps don't need to remove it from the door, but you will need to ensure it is disconnected from the mechanism, and this could be easiest if it is removed entirely. You will also be able to ...


4

Your window motor and/or regulator is going out. What happens is, the window motors have a thermal trip which tells them to stop when they get too hot. As a vehicle gets older, the window regulator and slides don't slide/move as well, so creates a lot more friction. The window motor starts wearing out because of this and more heat is produced, thus shutting ...


3

How old is the car? I think it's worth checking the fault codes, as sometimes a fault code can prevent an action like that. Clearing the fault codes can really improve a car if it hasn't had a computer connected in a while. Any faults which are persistent will come back and can then be worked on.


3

Can you post a picture of how it has cracked? It is hard to propose how to repair without seeing the specific damage. As for taking the door apart. Taking an inner door panel off isn't a very difficult or time consuming task in most vehicles it may take 30minutes if you are new to it. It shouldn't be required usually power window switches can be accessed by ...


3

Look in the underhood fuse box, it may be a maxi-fuse, or a circuit breaker. However they are not fused separately so if the other windows work it's not the fuse. The most common cause is the motor. One thing you can do is sitting in the car with the dome light on push the window button up and down and see if you notice the dome light get a little dimmer ...


3

You never know where used parts come from, unless you remove them, and even then you never know their state. I would suggest a new one, and hopefully from a reputable manufacturer. Also, I rarely saw motors go bad, as it was usually the window regulator that failed and would seize the window. The labor is usually around the same, but motors are about 3 times ...


2

This is what the mechanism should look like. You'll have to find a way to get at the three gold screws that hold the motor to the rest of the assembly. This will allow you to disengage the motor, so the rest of the assembly can move freely. Be careful: once you disengage the motor the window could drop and break. You'll want to get somebody to hold it, ...


2

Well according to my Haynes repair manual for a Nissan Armada 2005-2010 year model the power windows are protected by fuses and a circuit breaker. The fuses are located in the fuse panel and each motor is equipped with an internal circuit breaker, this prevents one stuck window from disabling the whole system.


2

Most of the stuff in the cabin of your car (power windows, radio, etc.) are commonly grouped together on the fuse labeled 'ACC'. This fuse is located in the fusebox under the hood or in a seperate fusebox located inside the cabin. Please consult your manual for the location of the fusebox(es) and a diagram of all the fuses. However, when one window doesn't ...


2

Sounds like the power window motors are dying. It's actually a fairly rare situation though, usually switches fail first. Might be worth pulling the switches and checking/cleaning them just to make sure you're not actually having some sort of weird intermittent switch connection that's making the motor appear to be weak.


2

It's probably the switches. The contacts do degrade over time. They can usually be cleaned if you know what you are doing, but most people would recommend just replacing them. Also if the windows have limit switches, these could also be sticking.


2

Intermittent open / short / bad ground in the wiring, flaky motors, or bad switches. You could pull a door panel and get busy with a multimeter when one is misbehaving. Assuming the circuit is fused, which it should be, you could probe at the fuse block and maybe localize a wiring fault to one side of the fuse. You could always take the shotgun ...


2

It's very likely the switch: I've had to disassemble and clean the contacts (using a small wire brush and spray contact-cleaner) the window switch on 4 of my Volvos that are of similar age. That's just my experience, but it's definitely where I'd start.


2

http://www.lmctruck.com/icatalog/cc/full.aspx?Page=16c lmc truck parts has it listed for 39.95


1

First, I'd like to try to clarify this whole situation a little. Your car has two keys, correct? An ignition key and an antitheft key that fits a special keyhole in the shifter, which manually permits the shifter to be shifted out of (P)ark without using the ignition key? As you drove home, you noticed a loss of power to the dash lights and power windows, ...


1

It sounds like your ignition switch is bad, and needs to be replaced. This is a common failure on Civics of that age, particularly on higher mileage cars. A replacement switch is around $70 from a local parts store, and can take a couple of hours to replace, depending on experience and familiarity with the portions of the car that need to be removed to ...


1

Since the only thing that changed between the time it worked and the time it didn't work was the passenger door, I'd be willing to bet that's your problem. Since there is no way to diagnose the specific electrical malfunction with this site, I suggest removing all the connections from the passenger door, and verifying that everything works as it should (car ...


1

I would suggest your best bet is to either speak to a mechanic you trust about it or get down to your nearest breakers yard and show them the part. Also Googling the part number can sometimes give some good results. To answer your question directly, if you don't get the part from a car that matches your cars specification then there is a high chance ...


1

Before investing in new switches, you might consider testing the wiring as well. Run your own, known-good wires from the switches to the window motor (this will require removing the interior trim from the door), and see what happens. While you have the door apart, you could also try lubricating the window mechanism. It might just be sticking.


1

Unfortunately there were no useful fault codes internally, but the fault was resolved to being the actuator switch for that window. A replacement was the only course of action. Update - got the full diagnostics. Turns out the switch had a fault which damaged part of the motor, so both were replaced!


1

I might be wrong, but have you looked through the switch circuitry? Sometimes those modules come all in one, and you have to replace it.


1

I had this on an old beat-up Chrysler. The temporary solution was to wedge a pair of vice grips between the window and the door frame (on the inside). The vice grips served a dual purpose: for holding the window up when it was raining and for grabbing the top of the window so I could pull it up, after I needed to let it slide down for any reason.


1

I had this happen many years ago with an old Volkswagen, just before a 700 mile drive. Duct tape is simple - tape the glass to the door frame, both inside and outside. And (as we learned very quickly) - if it is raining also duct tape all around the window!


1

Ever try rolling a power window up when it is already up? It tries, but it doesn't go anywhere--and nothing breaks. The answer is no; it does not matter where the output shaft/gear of the motor meshes with the driven gear.


1

Do you have any sort of loosing oil, like WD40? The glass might simply be stuck to the rubber seals that keep it from cracking in the clamps. If you can't see any other clamps, and it is still stuck; spray some WD40(or whatever) in there and gently separate the glass from rubber. I had this problem happen a couple of times on older BMWs while replacing ...



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