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Ahh yes, STOP thinking!!!, I have the answer!!! This is a trick question. "while in town use public transport". I contend that gearboxes for DMF will work fine with SMF, the gearbox failures maybe more likely due to design and after x Km they are failing or failure caused from the replaced worn DMF. If an exchange DMF to SMF is not available, it is an ...


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Most of my answer will be closely related to this answer: BSFC (Brake Specific Fuel Consumption) - How is this a beneficial measurement? Q1. The force in each stroke is directly related to the torque. There is less force in each stroke as the torque is decreasing. Power will increase with RPM to a certain point as power is a function of force over time. ...


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Torque is a rotational force. It is a measurement of how hard it is applying force that causes the crankshaft to rotate. Torque is not a very good unit of measurement for an engine because it does not take into consideration how fast the output shaft rotates. For example, given an engine with 100 lb-ft. of torque, if you put that output through a 10:1 ...


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Dual Mass Flywheels absorb the harmonic torsional vibration caused by low rpm in few cylinder engines ie 4 cyl at under 1500 rpm, worst under load. That is when the DMF will be working and wearing most and at a time that you can reduce wear, but low rpm is where the economy is and this is why the DMF is used, to take advantage of the low rpm economy without ...


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If you are looking for a cheap non-permanent modification with enough HP that you can feel... One solution would be a propane and nitrous spray before the air filter. The propane acts as extra fuel to burn, which will increase power up to the point that all oxygen gets consumed. Past that point the exhaust will start getting really smoky. Then you add ...


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Unfortunately, there isn't a whole lot you can do with a 1.3CDTi - as the others have said, make sure it's in the best condition you can, but you're not going to get the 'kick' you desire. I'm assuming you're fairly young, and in the UK (as you link to a UK site for the specs) - you'll almost certainly find that any modification will cause your insurance to ...


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I'd say the only realistic option with a 1.3 liter turbodiesel besides an engine swap is chiptuning/remapping. And even then I'd research the potential of this engine, you'll be shortening it's life considerably. Many performance oriented modifications will work, but in my opinion are simply not worth the investment with this engine, as the gains will be ...


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Increasing engine performance is going to fall into a couple different categories - tuning, increase air flow, reduce losses. Before you do anything, make sure your engine is in good working order. Change the fluids, change the spark plugs, make sure brakes and suspension are in good order. You may be able to look around online and find a performance ecu ...


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In the worst case, using an expired tyre can be fatal - as the rubber ages, it perishes (dries out), and becomes weaker and brittle. At speed, it heats up and the pressure increases (as the air inside also heats up). This can lead to a blowout - there is a well known case in the UK where a classic car owner had 25 year old 'new' (i.e. previously unused) ...


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Short answer: Yes, yes and yes. BUT: A tire doesn't have an expiry date. The reason for all three points is that the rubber gets harder over time and looses its grip / traction, especially on wet ground. Keep in mind grip is not only important for acceleration and braking, but it also keeps the car on the street in curves. Rubber not only gets harder, but ...


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Steel rims are cheaper to replace than alloy wheels. Alloy wheels tend get damaged by the salt and can develop air leaks around the tire beads. Steel rims you can paint with tremclad type of paint to deal with the rust prior to mounting tires. Steel rims are also full rims which help protect the brakes from ice,snow and salt. Alloy rims don't offer the same ...



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