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11

tl;dr: No. This sort of vehicle dynamics question best addressed by Racing Car Vehicle Dynamics What follows is a basic discussion at the high school physics level. As you will see from the reference text, high school physics is insufficient to statically model the complete vehicle system. A dynamic model is required to agree with easily obtainable ...


3

Doing incremental upgrades is a very wise move - not only does it spread the costs, but it also gives you a much better idea of the effect of each change you make. For mountain driving (and, in fact, for any situation), the first things I would look at are the brakes and tyres. The tyres are vital, as they're the only things keeping you on the road! The ...


2

The obvious (though not necessarily right) answer is no, the rules don't make the cars safer if ballast is allowed. But I would add that that doesn't mean the guys at Red Bull will deliberately make a car unsafe. If they kill their star driver, they won't win any more races. Materials are lighter than ever and engineers have the benefit of experience, but ...


2

Bob cross makes some good points, however, I would offer the following opinions: Winter tires don't have the dry grip that summer tires do. Your "high performance" handling will be limited with your winter tires on. Therefore, I wouldn't be too concerned about the incremental difference in handling due to the difference in unsprung weight between steel and ...


2

Is there a noticeable difference in handling due to the added weight of steel wheels? (seems to be 5-10 lbs more per wheel, ignore the salt and potholes for now) (scaling safety and performance) Yes. Assuming that your steel wheels are heavier than your alloy wheels (which might or might not be true), you'll be facing an increase in unsprung weight ...


2

Before you go fast, you need to be able to slow down. That means better brakes and tires and possibly uprated suspension components (springs and shocks). And strut braces if you don't mind shortening the life of your tires. With that out of the way, as far as making the car go faster, I always work from back to front, meaning I make sure that the things ...


2

The Ford will definitely be cheaper to run. Partly because, as you say, it is a more common car, and so parts are more readily available, but also because the Subaru has the flat-four 'boxer' engine, which is commonly known for being a pig to work on, as almost everything is inaccessible with the engine in the car... The Subaru will also cost more in fuel ...


2

Preface I ended up doing a fair bit of thinking and research on this, so I figure I may as well write up what I found. Thanks all those who responded, particularly BobCross. In the end though, I wanted an answer that went beyond calling a car a mystery box on balloons - I asked this question because I actually want to understand it. Intro - Tires Given ...


2

Speaking to the asker: From page 158 of the 2005 Crossfire Owner's Manual: "DaimlerChrysler Corporation requires the use of 91 octane or higher premium fuel to minimize the potential for engine damage." Spend the extra $4 per fill-up and get the 91 octane. Speaking to the question itself: Without specifics, and without defining "high" and "high ...


2

You have a lot of big questions here, so will try to answer them for you, but be ready for the diatribe of the century ;-) There is a simple rule when talking about power/torque output which goes: There is no replacement for displacement. If you increase the size of the four cylinder (through whatever method) to match the size of the six cylinder, you will ...


1

From Wikipedia: Brake horsepower (bhp) is the measure of an engine's horsepower before the loss in power caused by the gearbox, alternator, differential, water pump, and other auxiliary components such as power steering pump, muffled exhaust system, etc. Brake refers to a device which was used to load an engine and hold it at a desired rotational speed. ...


1

Your torque convertor has a convertor lock-up clutch. When reaching a nominal speed and engine RPM the convertor comes on and locks the convertor forming a slip free drive. When you use kick-down or near full throttle acceleration, the convertor clutch unlocks. This allows the stator in the convertor to allow torque multiplication and give the vehicle its ...


1

Id say something is wrong with the transmission from the fluid flush, it is not the easiest thing to flush transmission fluid, and in doing so with certain transmissions you can actually do more damage than good if not done right. What it sounds like is its not in the correct gear and shifting at the incorrect points, this would be caused by many things but ...


1

Working at drag strip has taught me one thing. That 1500 horsepower cars can and quite often run on pump 93oct. So does it. not really for street. Yet if you have I'd say 10.1 or higher compression with say 500 horses or more yeah but be careful timing is important. Most modern engines auto correct their timing by advancing or retarding ignition. If lower ...


1

If it were my money, I'd spend it on another Astra or even the 1.6 Turbo Corsa. But it's NOT my money, so I reckon the Ford is the better option economy-wise. I believe it will also provide greater sporty characteristics. I know that sounds counter-intuitive, but the Impreza 1.5R is actually a bit of a dog with all that extra weight thanks to the AWD system. ...



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