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10

You have severe case of corrosion. The part is called the lower control arm. Its function is to maintain the tire in the correct position. Do not attempt to drive the vehicle. In the best case scenario you will cause more damage, the tire could hit the fender, the axle could separate or you can bend something else. In the worst case you kill someone when ...


7

I'm not positive, but it looks like a vent actuator. In most older vehicles there were manual vents down in the foot well area of the passenger cabin. You'd have to reach down to actuate it by pulling/pushing a knob. Since Buick's were a little more on the "high end" of the car food chain, they would have such controls at easier access to the driver ...


5

That is the anti lock brake module or ABS. While it is in you engine compartment it has nothing to do with the engine. The reason it has a 4x4 sticker on it is that ABS for 4x4 vehicles is slightly different than the ABS on regular two wheel drive vehicles.


4

This is your Heater Control Valve But I am going to explain what it does. First of all the "wire" you see is actually a vacuum line, it's a hollow (hopefully) air-tight tube that passes vacuum to the Heater Control Valve. The heater control valve is a vacuum actuated valve that in the open position allows fluid to pass through and in the closed position ...


4

It really depends on what the piece is you are talking about. Some vehicles have an air dam on the bottom of the car which forces air to flow through the radiator while the vehicle is running down the road. This piece would (in its normal position) extend directly down under neath the radiator core. You'd also have a space just in front of the piece where ...


3

A confidential vehicle identification is just a VIN in a hidden place that is only known by the manufacturer and law enforcement. It is used to thwart car cloning. Examples of this would be a VIN stamped into the wheel arch liner, ashtray, on the floor under the spare tyre , etc - i.e. a non-obvious location.


3

Yes, Wikipedia. That isn't a joke. That list will actually get you a fair ways towards being able to tell a mechanic something useful. For example, sometimes it's not immediately obvious if you're looking at a catalytic converter or a resonator. However, given that vocabulary list, you'd at least be able to say "this part is rattling" and when the mechanic ...


3

Lol, I had forgot about this post :-) I figured out finally what connector I needed: Z03FBR manufactured by Mitsubishi. I was able to find them in Japan at this seller: http://www.best-sys.com/products/detail.php?product_id=92 The website is only in Japanese so knowing little bit of kanji would help :-) So I bought the parts separately (the female, the ...


2

From the picture I would say a "lower control arm". It is also referred to as an "A" arm. The usual reasons for needing to change it are a worn ball joint if it is integrated into the arm and worn bushings, again if they are integrated into the assembly.


2

Well, here are the two which I believe they are for ... looks about as close as you are going to get: top hubcap and bottom hubcap if that helps. Yes, they look as though they have been painted over. I would bet Henry would have had a fit had these come off the assembly line looking like that ;-)


2

I was thinking on this and what could be done. I don't know exactly what the space is called, but I have another idea for you. Take some larger (whatever size you need for the main hole) nuts, align them, then weld them together. You can put how many ever you need together to make them the right width. You can also grind the ends down to make them exactly ...


2

Rip it off if you want. It isn't directing air into a radiator. It isn't acting as an air dam (keeping airflow from under the car to keep it from lifting at speed). It is most likely a valance/splash guard/splash shield. Yank it off or hold it up with a zip tie. They were usually not held on with bolts but a plastic trim fastener that looked somewhat ...


2

Here is the part number for your carb. This is for an OEM Yamaha carb. 3HN-14101-00-00


2

I could not get any junkyard to reply to my inquiry. I contacted the parts department directly at the dealership and they were able to order it at a reasonable price.


1

The same parts often have vendor-specific names. I can't help but thinking that internal threading is optional, if you have room for a nut and lock washer on the far side. If this is the case, a trip to the plumbing store and a hacksaw will complete your needs.


1

This is line for Fuel evaporation regeneration system.


1

I had the same problem with my Civic. It was actually an intake mount, one little bracket causing all the shaking. I just decided to let the motor rest on it and didn't bolt it back together until later. I bent mine pushing and shoving up and down on the intake getting it out. Apparently motors and how they are mounted are very balanced pieces of machinery. ...



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