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23

If you have one available, use a trickle-charger to bring the battery back up slowly, instead of jump-starting it. Check the tires. They are probably pretty low at this point. See if they are dry rotted (all cracked and ready to wear quickly). Check all of the fluids in the typical way. Note that it's okay if the oil shows a little low since it's not warm ...


16

The reason is that motorcycles traditionally have the fuel tank higher than the carburetor, and the fuel feeds with gravity alone. What risks does this introduce that necessitates a manual shutoff? Without the shutoff, if the carburetor float failed to close the valve tightly enough to stop the fuel flow, then gas would continue to trickle into the carb, ...


7

If the gas didn't wasn't treated, then it will be broken down. That means a gummy varnish substance everywhere, but most critically in the carburetor/fuel injector. That may stop the engine from starting, or at least make it run badly. If you can get the engine to start, you can use a product like Sea Foam (http://www.seafoamsales.com/). Their instructions ...


7

My dad actually brought back a truck (big type semi) from a condition like this - it had a manual transmission but we did the maintenance stuff, replace belts, oil, lubricants etc. THEN we hooked up a chain, put it in gear and proceeded to drag it (tow) (in gear) for a while (a half hour to an hour?) at a slow speed - this allowed the engine to be fully ...


4

How serious are you about this? Some pressure treated 2" x 12" planks under the tires will protect them from ground rot. Sun will age your paint job and rubber. You'd be doing your car a favor to put some kind of cover over it that will shade the car and deflect rain. I have seen canvas "garages" for $200 that would do the trick, although keeping air ...


4

The primary reason for shutting off the fuel is safety. On a motorcycle the fuel tank is directly above the engine. If fuel were to leak it would drip directly on the hot engine. This along with the fact that most motorcycles use a rubber supply hose that is exposed to the engine heat and the resulting decomposition. On an automobile the fuel is usually ...


3

My suggestion is always park with the transmission in gear and the park brake on. Along with curbing the wheels. Gear selection (forward or reverse) on flat ground, I choose reverse. My reasoning is that a vehicle parked curbside is more likely to be struck from the rear. Even a nudge from a careless driver can push the vehicle if it is only held by the park ...


3

I would get a reversing camera instead. You can get the type that is mounted on the license plate and then you can either get a radio/headunit which supports backup cams or get a rearview mirror which has a backup display. Personally I would try to get a rearview mirror one. I think you can get the mirror for about ~$500 with the camera but I don't remember ...


3

My worry about the electromagnetic one is that while it is good at picking up metal objects that you may hit, they aren't so good at organic objects. Ultrasonic reversing sensors are good at detecting solid objects, but not so good at soft objects. As solid objects are important to identify, whether or not they are metal, the ultrasonic sensors are, in my ...


3

In an automatic, Park should only be for parking. It will probably say this in the user manual. Applying neutral and the handbrake are recommended by bodies such as the Institute of Advanced Motorists as being safest in the event of a collision, and least likely to dazzle whoever is behind, as @NickC said.


2

I would be hesitant to make a raised platform using wood. Keep in mind even a very light car is around 3000 lbs, the last thing you really want to do is park your car and have the front wheels go right through that platform. The wood wouldn't be a bad idea to help kill the weeds (though weed killer would have worked pretty well also). I'm in the same ...


2

Considerations: The engine spins faster in park... You put more wear and tear on the auto trans linkage assembly by using it more In park though there is probably a bit less stress on the torque converter in the transmission. My opinion ... no difference either way.


2

Using bricks as you describe will not cause this type of tire damage/issues. It seems to me you have a defective tire or you hit something while car was traveling at speed (I doubt this though, as you'd probably see damage to the wheel as well). On a side note, using the bricks as bump stops in the garage is a pretty good idea, in my book.


1

The schools teach you to park in neutral to prevent you from causing the car to jerk forward the next time you start it and forget to step on the clutch first. So here goes: If you don't want to have a minor accident while starting your car because you forgot to step on the clutch, leave it in neutral. If you want the extra protection of having your front ...


1

The best solution is to shift into neutral and apply the handbrake. Shifting into park is fairly pointless imho (unless you're actually parking, obviously!), but you should never hold the car on the footbrake when stationary, as this keeps your brake lights on and so dazzles the driver behind you.


1

When you put an automatic transmission into park it is applying a brake on the transmission (I don't know the details of this because I only drive manuals so I try to learn as little as I can about automatics :) ). I've observed on automatics though that once you go into park and let go of your brake pedal, it shifts slightly until it "catches the ...



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