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6

Honda's and Accuras are famous for using wear indicators that are shaped/oriented a specific way that causes them to grind only when you reverse. In all likelihood you have a worn brake pad and probably some rotors that need to be replaced at the same time.


6

If the light was shut off after pumping the foot brakes the issue was not the parking brake. The problem is in the regular braking system you use to stop the car, as such it needs immediate attention. It may have been caused by something as simple as low brake fluid level. If the level is low either the system has a leak or the brake pads are worn to the ...


5

Most cars use the same light to let you know there is a problem with the brakes, or the fluid level. While watching the light push down and release the emergency brake see if you see the light flicker. If you do it's not the emergency brake that is turning the light on, if not check the switch on the emergency brake usually on the e-brake handle or pedal. ...


3

My suggestion is always park with the transmission in gear and the park brake on. Along with curbing the wheels. Gear selection (forward or reverse) on flat ground, I choose reverse. My reasoning is that a vehicle parked curbside is more likely to be struck from the rear. Even a nudge from a careless driver can push the vehicle if it is only held by the park ...


3

I had a similar problem a couple of years ago which turned out to be the handbrake cable being loose - at the rest position it was slightly slack which enabled the lever to 'bounce' slightly, which made the warning light come on. It was solved by disconnecting and refitting the cable, then re-tensioning it. If you can get at the switch on the lever, try ...


2

You have either stretched the cable(s) or pulled them out of alignment, both of which can usually be solved by re-adjusting them. The adjuster can be found at the point the cables reach the lever, but depending on the design it may be inside the car (under some trim between the seats) or underneath - Your workshop manual should tell you which it is, and ...


2

Toyotas (and presumably Scions as well) are VERY sensitive to brake fluid level. You can be well within the "acceptable" range, yet when under braking the fluid will move enough to just barely trip the sensor. I keep mine topped right up to the "full" mark to avoid the light flickering under braking. Then, when installing new brakes, I bleed some fluid ...


2

How humid is it outside when this happens? It could just be surface rust getting scraped away. This usually isn't very loud, but kind of a low metal on metal slushing/grinding sound. It may also be that your brakes are "resonating", which is a term I just invented to describe the somewhat loud, low reverberations that are caused by the brakes quickly ...


2

Check to ensure you have enough fluid in the brake master cylinder. A lot of vehicles have the sensor which detects the level of the fluid in on the same circuit as the parking brake. If you find this low, you may want to check the condition of your brake pads. If the brake pads are thin, there is more fluid residing in your calipers which would in turn give ...


1

The schools teach you to park in neutral to prevent you from causing the car to jerk forward the next time you start it and forget to step on the clutch first. So here goes: If you don't want to have a minor accident while starting your car because you forgot to step on the clutch, leave it in neutral. If you want the extra protection of having your front ...


1

The quick lube place isn't thinking quite right. 1500 RPM means different amounts of power with different engines. Most American V8 engines tend to have a lot of low-end torque. On my 2.5L V4 car, cruising speed is ~2,700 RPM. On a former 5.7L V8 pickup, it was 1500 rpm -- enough power to move a loaded truck and 16 foot trailer at highway speed. Parking ...


1

There are two kinds of friction, static and dynamic (kinetic). Static is always higher than dynamic, and I think that's why you can't test the brakes at a sustained higher RPM, as once you passed the static point, it drops a bit. This makes the car easier to move under load. So your assessment is right, and a sustained 1500 RPM will likely get your car ...



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