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11

For most practical purposes, it's done for cosmetic reasons. One might prefer to use black over silver for better heat dissipation but the motivation is almost always going to be to enhance appearance. In cast iron blocks, the paint can act as a means of rust prevention.


7

It is mainly for aesthetics. Something else it can do for you is to allow you to see when you have a leak. I've seen blocks painted white for this reason. Something you didn't mention was whether you are talking about painting the outside or the inside of the engine. If done right, painting the inside of the engine can result in oil returning faster to ...


7

Bodywork is something that cannot be rushed. While others are suggesting chemicals that may be suited for this application, it is not necessarily going to be a solution to your problem. The most important part of bodywork/painting is preparation and cleanliness. I cannot stress this enough. When applying bondo, fibreglass, spot putty, primer, paint, ...


6

You can use this method to pull certain types of dents. Here is one method to resolve the dent issue. Dent Pulling glue these plastic ding tabs to the center of the dent. You can find them by googling "plastic ding tab" You will use a hot glue gun and hot glue them to your dent. Use a dent puller slide hammer. The tip should screw into the plastic ...


4

A photograph of the scratches would help immensely here are light scratches and damage in the paint can be removed with just abrasives such as T-Cut or Rubbing Compound. The bumper will only rust if it's metal and most modern cars use plastic bumpers. If you were to get the panel professionally painted, the painter would not simply paint over the scratches ...


4

You can get it covered with epoxy primer. If you have many pits and cavities, it would be best to go over the areas with a wire brush and then shoot your primer. I recommend a wire brush for the pitted areas vs a typical sanding block as it will not penetrate areas with depth. If moisture is trapped in there, expect it to corrode through. It is best to ...


4

Yes, you should try to remove it as soon as possible. When a bug is smashed into the front of your car all of its guts are allowed to mix together. Most bugs will result in an acidic goop that sticks to your car. You can see it on your windshield, but you won't see it very well on your front grille until the damage starts to accumulate. This acid will etch ...


3

Is this only a cosmetic problem, or is it more serious? (For instance, is it likely to lead to rusting of the sheet metal, or any structural problem?) Currently it appears to be a cosmetic issue. Untreated, exposed to the elements, it will eventually create a greater perimeter around your vehicle and rust will occur. Others may not agree with me but I ...


3

Depending on the bolt hole tolerances you start out with, the paint may prevent the bolt from screwing into the bolt hole. It's not that difficult to avoid the problem - plug in a rag, tissue paper or something that acts as a barrier to the paint. Once the paint is dry, pull it out to leave thread that is unscathed.


3

The paintwork looks like it's suffering from orange peel. It may be that you need more or thicker coats on it. To get a nice shiny finish from what you have you effectively need to flatten out the outer surface of the paint finish. There are a few ways to do this. As stated previously, cutting paste can be quite effective but may take quite a long time. ...


3

If I were you, I'd just do it right and be done with it. Don't feel bad about the peeling paint as all of the Dodge/Chrysler products of the era did the same thing (GM had a phase of this as well ... I would bet Ford had its problems in this area to boot). The problem was (from my understanding) when manufacturers were required to go to water based paint to ...


3

Use some WD-40 and a little elbow grease and it should come right off. Spray the WD-40 right onto the glue residue, then wipe off with a soft cloth. This will destroy the cloth in the process by having the glue residue build up on it, but the glue will be off your vehicle. When you have cleaned the entire area, ensure you wash the vehicle, as what's left of ...


3

The key to understanding the differences lies in how car detailing and paint restoration works. The key word here is aggression, referring to the "rate of cut" of the pad. Here are the pads rated from most aggressive to least aggressive based on the information provided by 3M. 1. Compounding pad Compounding refers to the process of "levelling" defects ...


3

I am a Pilot Car driver and have taped my sign on my pick up several times. When I remove it and the glue is left I use WD-40 and it removes the glue. It alse removes tar from your vehicle too.


2

Bodywork can be really fun or it can make you cry. There are some general rules to adhere to. Rule 1 - Don't use anything over 400 grit on the plastic bodywork like the front bumper. It will scar it up. Rule 2 - Put the power tools away when you are dealing with the flexible plastic, unless it's a sander (not a grinder) with 400 grit or finer SP. Rule 3 ...


2

The orbital sander would work fine. Use paint stripper only on metal body parts because it would dissolve plastic parts. Strip any area of paint that you intend to work on. Body filler won't hold well on a smooth paint surface. Start with about 180 grit to strip the paint. Sand a reasonable area around the ding as well, 2 or 3 inches is fine. Make sure you ...


2

I think you may be overthinking this. Parallax means the appearance will vary depending on the distance and angle between the viewer and the truck, so unless there's some ISO standard reference point for racing stripe viewing, whatever shape looks right at (say) six feet will look off from 40' away in the opposite lane, and vice versa. I'd base any line ...


2

Yes, as long as there isn't any damage to it, you can do this. You don't even need to get it painted by the dealer. Most body shops (if their worth their mettle) can color match to your car. You'll need to allow them to pull the color code off of the car, then you're golden. It is easier to get a clean, unpainted one for the body shop to paint, but they ...


2

Paulster2 has covered the painting angle, so I would like to take a look at other alternatives. The only way to get the exact original look, with the same finish as on the other car panels is through a professional paint job. If doing a DIY job, this is just about impossible to get - so let's go wild and aim for something totally different. One option are ...


2

I'm not a paint & body guy, but every one I have talked to suggested to me you put down one layer, then let it dry until it gets tacky (about 10 minutes or so), then lay down your next layer. I guess since you sanded between layers you should have good adhesion, but ... I would suggest that cutting then buffing are in your future. Right now I'm guessing ...


2

It's not the application technique, but the material being applied. Chrome plating is a process where actual molecules of chrome metal are attracted to a surface using electrical current. It covers the surface of the parts with a layer of real metal. Of course metal is very hard, and will be difficult to scratch. The strength of paint will be limited to ...


2

I appreciate the Sherwin-Willaims Automotive Paint Troubleshooting Guide (PDF) for this. It is a very thorough guide that gives descriptions of what is going wrong, why, and how to avoid/fix it. Here's a rundown of various problems with sample pictures of common names for problems. You can use the names as a starting point for further research. I'll be ...


2

This looks like textbook cracking. This is a failure that can be caused by a myriad of sources, from chemical incompatability of paint and clearcoat to improperly applied paint. Your friend's inexperience with painting might be the root cause. Four years is a long time for a poorly applied clearcoat job to start showing issues, it could be something else. ...


1

If the car is covered in superficial scratches then a good polishing job will work wonders. Take it to a reputable shop and behold how sexy you car has become. You can do it yourself if you have a polishing machine, it will be a huge chore without it. Note that it won't help against deeper scratches, it is hard to tell from the photo how deep they are in ...


1

You can use a fine grit rubbing compound and a buffing wheel to smooth out the clear coat, which actually has the scratches. Part of the process of painting many vehicles is to buff out the clear coat once the paint job is complete. The clear coat provides a clear protective layer for the paint and can be scratched lightly and repaired over time by using ...


1

Go to a paint shop. They can look up the color codes for your vehicle.


1

If the paint is metallic, then the top coat will be a clear lacquer. Other than not looking very nice, it shouldn't be a problem just leaving it. You could carefully flatten the lacquer with some fine wet and dry paper to remove the dull area where it is peeling off, then spray some clear lacquer on. Be careful not to rub through the paint, however.


1

I apologize for such a long answer. Your question is not simple. Most higher quality coating for metal require a hardener, etc. This makes things more complicated. I would get someone more experience to do your paint job for you unless you plan to do a lot of painting in the future, then watch a lot of you tube videos or take some classes. There are two ...


1

While painting a bumper at home is always possible, you would need to: Prepare the surface correctly: clean off the products used to de-mold the plastic, sand the part if there is a granular relief motive. Apply the appropriate primer. Specific primers may be used for the paint to stick to the plastic correctly, and even better primers that have some flex ...



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