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11

For most practical purposes, it's done for cosmetic reasons. One might prefer to use black over silver for better heat dissipation but the motivation is almost always going to be to enhance appearance. In cast iron blocks, the paint can act as a means of rust prevention.


7

It is mainly for aesthetics. Something else it can do for you is to allow you to see when you have a leak. I've seen blocks painted white for this reason. Something you didn't mention was whether you are talking about painting the outside or the inside of the engine. If done right, painting the inside of the engine can result in oil returning faster to ...


3

I am a Pilot Car driver and have taped my sign on my pick up several times. When I remove it and the glue is left I use WD-40 and it removes the glue. It alse removes tar from your vehicle too.


3

The paintwork looks like it's suffering from orange peel. It may be that you need more or thicker coats on it. To get a nice shiny finish from what you have you effectively need to flatten out the outer surface of the paint finish. There are a few ways to do this. As stated previously, cutting paste can be quite effective but may take quite a long time. ...


3

If you want the job done right, then yes: grinding, filling, sanding, priming, and spraying are your best option. There are alternatives out there. Duplicolor makes color matched kits which allows you to paint in the smaller chips (it has an abrasive, color paint brush, then a clear coat to go over the top). I haven't used them, but the product looks like a ...


3

It's not going to take more work than it would have if the paint was faded or spotty or had teardrops (running paint because it was applied too thick). It's just lots of sanding and filling in imperfections.


3

If I were you, I'd just do it right and be done with it. Don't feel bad about the peeling paint as all of the Dodge/Chrysler products of the era did the same thing (GM had a phase of this as well ... I would bet Ford had its problems in this area to boot). The problem was (from my understanding) when manufacturers were required to go to water based paint to ...


3

Use some WD-40 and a little elbow grease and it should come right off. Spray the WD-40 right onto the glue residue, then wipe off with a soft cloth. This will destroy the cloth in the process by having the glue residue build up on it, but the glue will be off your vehicle. When you have cleaned the entire area, ensure you wash the vehicle, as what's left of ...


3

The key to understanding the differences lies in how car detailing and paint restoration works. The key word here is aggression, referring to the "rate of cut" of the pad. Here are the pads rated from most aggressive to least aggressive based on the information provided by 3M. 1. Compounding pad Compounding refers to the process of "levelling" defects ...


2

Paulster2 has covered the painting angle, so I would like to take a look at other alternatives. The only way to get the exact original look, with the same finish as on the other car panels is through a professional paint job. If doing a DIY job, this is just about impossible to get - so let's go wild and aim for something totally different. One option are ...


2

Bodywork can be really fun or it can make you cry. There are some general rules to adhere to. Rule 1 - Don't use anything over 400 grit on the plastic bodywork like the front bumper. It will scar it up. Rule 2 - Put the power tools away when you are dealing with the flexible plastic, unless it's a sander (not a grinder) with 400 grit or finer SP. Rule 3 ...


2

The orbital sander would work fine. Use paint stripper only on metal body parts because it would dissolve plastic parts. Strip any area of paint that you intend to work on. Body filler won't hold well on a smooth paint surface. Start with about 180 grit to strip the paint. Sand a reasonable area around the ding as well, 2 or 3 inches is fine. Make sure you ...


2

The main problem with using a cleaner like this is, while it removes all of the dirt and debris from the paint, it also removes any protection the paint might have on it, leaving it exposed to the elements and to UV rays which can cause faiding, oxidization, cracking, and pealing. Remember, glass is very resilliant stuff. It can withstand harsh chemicals (if ...


2

You need to use a flexible body filler specifically intended for polyurethane bumpers. It looks like the filler you used has detached from the substrate due to flexing (which could be solely due to temperature and not impact). The filler you used was for small dent repair on non-flexible metal panels. Also, I don't know how big of an area you filled but the ...


2

Yeah you can add a flex agent if you think that's the case or you can make sure it's sanded rough and then do like 3 or 4 layers of paint. You could also sand it down further, and cover it with fiberglass or epoxy resin, then sand that and paint it.


2

By "maintain" I'm going to assume you are asking if it will provide enough air flow to do the work you need to do. If this is right, we'd need to know if your spray gun is a High Volume Low Pressure (HVLP) type spray gun. If so, the compressor should do you just fine. I would bet, though, if you are going to be doing a lot of painting with this, even with ...


2

I think you may be overthinking this. Parallax means the appearance will vary depending on the distance and angle between the viewer and the truck, so unless there's some ISO standard reference point for racing stripe viewing, whatever shape looks right at (say) six feet will look off from 40' away in the opposite lane, and vice versa. I'd base any line ...


2

I'm not a paint & body guy, but every one I have talked to suggested to me you put down one layer, then let it dry until it gets tacky (about 10 minutes or so), then lay down your next layer. I guess since you sanded between layers you should have good adhesion, but ... I would suggest that cutting then buffing are in your future. Right now I'm guessing ...


2

Yes, as long as there isn't any damage to it, you can do this. You don't even need to get it painted by the dealer. Most body shops (if their worth their mettle) can color match to your car. You'll need to allow them to pull the color code off of the car, then you're golden. It is easier to get a clean, unpainted one for the body shop to paint, but they ...


1

When looking at the car (and I think you have most of it already covered in your question): The leading edges are the most susceptible ... this would include any part of the front fascia The A-pillar and maybe the leading edge of the roof Any part of the side which when looking at it, dips in, then comes back out ... the part which comes back out is ...


1

I apologize for such a long answer. Your question is not simple. Most higher quality coating for metal require a hardener, etc. This makes things more complicated. I would get someone more experience to do your paint job for you unless you plan to do a lot of painting in the future, then watch a lot of you tube videos or take some classes. There are two ...


1

While painting a bumper at home is always possible, you would need to: Prepare the surface correctly: clean off the products used to de-mold the plastic, sand the part if there is a granular relief motive. Apply the appropriate primer. Specific primers may be used for the paint to stick to the plastic correctly, and even better primers that have some flex ...


1

I'd agree with Juann Strauss' comment. Try drawing the shape of the stripes out on the car with masking tape, then adjusting until they look right to you. Once you've got a shape you're happy with, run a new strip of tape along the outside of the ones you've just drawn, and peel off the original (so you've now got the paint you're keeping masked instead of ...


1

The first thing that I usually try in situations like this is some cleaner wax (e.g., some Zymol - it's cheap, cheerful and smells nice): I'm pretty pleased with the procedure that I outlined in the attached "door ding" answer. The most important point, though, is that patience is key. You're almost certainly super annoyed at this situation (I'm annoyed ...



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