Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

For most practical purposes, it's done for cosmetic reasons. One might prefer to use black over silver for better heat dissipation but the motivation is almost always going to be to enhance appearance. In cast iron blocks, the paint can act as a means of rust prevention.


5

It is mainly for aesthetics. Something else it can do for you is to allow you to see when you have a leak. I've seen blocks painted white for this reason. Something you didn't mention was whether you are talking about painting the outside or the inside of the engine. If done right, painting the inside of the engine can result in oil returning faster to ...


3

The paintwork looks like it's suffering from orange peel. It may be that you need more or thicker coats on it. To get a nice shiny finish from what you have you effectively need to flatten out the outer surface of the paint finish. There are a few ways to do this. As stated previously, cutting paste can be quite effective but may take quite a long time. ...


2

If I were you, I'd just do it right and be done with it. Don't feel bad about the peeling paint as all of the Dodge/Chrysler products of the era did the same thing (GM had a phase of this as well ... I would bet Ford had its problems in this area to boot). The problem was (from my understanding) when manufacturers were required to go to water based paint to ...


2

Yes, as long as there isn't any damage to it, you can do this. You don't even need to get it painted by the dealer. Most body shops (if their worth their mettle) can color match to your car. You'll need to allow them to pull the color code off of the car, then you're golden. It is easier to get a clean, unpainted one for the body shop to paint, but they ...


2

I'm not a paint & body guy, but every one I have talked to suggested to me you put down one layer, then let it dry until it gets tacky (about 10 minutes or so), then lay down your next layer. I guess since you sanded between layers you should have good adhesion, but ... I would suggest that cutting then buffing are in your future. Right now I'm guessing ...


1

I apologize for such a long answer. Your question is not simple. Most higher quality coating for metal require a hardener, etc. This makes things more complicated. I would get someone more experience to do your paint job for you unless you plan to do a lot of painting in the future, then watch a lot of you tube videos or take some classes. There are two ...


1

While painting a bumper at home is always possible, you would need to: Prepare the surface correctly: clean off the products used to de-mold the plastic, sand the part if there is a granular relief motive. Apply the appropriate primer. Specific primers may be used for the paint to stick to the plastic correctly, and even better primers that have some flex ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible