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15

If its deep enough that merely wiping it doesn't remove it, the scuff is deeper than just the very top surface of your paint. First, try Meguiars Scratch-x with a microfiber cloth. Rub it in. Try two or three passes to see if this removes the scuff mark. Doing so by hand won't remove any of your paint unless its been compromised (cracked, flaking, ...


10

tl;dr: Even if you only use spray wax after a wash, it's better than nothing. It depends on where you live, what kind of driving you do and how you generally maintain your car. The short answer is that waxing a car puts a sacrificial layer on top of the clear coat which sits on top of the paint (assuming that you have a generally standard paint job). ...


8

Clean the stickers and the immediate surroundings using a strong solution of car all purpose cleaner and water or car shampoo (without wax!) and water. Warm the sticker with a hairdryer or a hot air gun to about 30 degrees Celcius. Start peeling of the sticker gently, you might want to use some thing plastic tool like a plastic putty knife of an ATM card or ...


7

Most dealers offer these coatings and protectants and they are little more than wax (if anything). I always tell the dealer that I don't want any of these coatings and I won't pay for them. They always take the charge off. There's nothing out there that will keep your finish looking great except regular maintainence. I spent 8 years in the auto body ...


7

Before you do anything else, try some goo-gone. This should remove any paint from the other vehicle, without affecting the paint on your car. (If you're really concerned about it affecting your paint, you could try it in a small, inconspicuous area, but I've done this on a number of cars with no ill effects). If after removing the paint, you can still see ...


6

If you've exposed bare metal, then your vehicle could start to accumulate rust, which can, over time, destroy your vehicle and be costly to fix. This Automotive Touch Up Video demonstrates how you can take care of small dings in the paint yourself. The video is 11 minutes long and uses inexpensive tools to repair the damage. If rust has started to form, ...


6

With any paint, there will be a degree of fading and yellowing from the UV radiation present in sunlight. If you look at old cars which have been left in the sun, they look uneven in colour and often quite faded. This is normally repaired by cutting away the "dead" and faded layer of paint. With modern paints this effect is reduced compared to older ...


6

The manufacture provides a warranty on the paint and corrosion, and what they're selling you usually doesn't extend that. All of the dealers I have worked at sold some kind of paint protection and rust protection. The paint protection was a wax job, a good one no less, but a wax job that you could get at a high quality detail shop for about $150, but they ...


5

Yes, they do work for what they're intended (removing contamination on the paint, overspray etc) and no, as far as I know they're not the same as pottery clay but have some other ingredients in them. Rubbing pottery clay on your car will more or less give you the same result as rubbing sand on it... Keep in mind that using a clay bar only make sense as part ...


5

You could try auto detailing clay (aka clay bar). It is a slightly abrasive clay material that is used to remove surface contaminants. This is the most gentle (non-chemical) solution you can try. Admittedly, it may be too gentle for this. If that doesn't work, you may have to step up to liquid polish. You can technically use a fine grained sandpaper on ...


5

You are looking for a mask to filter particulates, an N95 HEPA mask or should be sufficient, they are usually pink or purple in color. You are correct that a dust mask is insufficient. If you have a beard, or as I do just think these are more comfortable then you can use a PAPR (pronounced papper) or Powered Air Purifying Respirator. Here are some examples ...


4

In conjunction with @Bob's answer, for next time, prevention is even better than cure: If you can't park undercover, our use a cover on your car, invest some time and money in applying a good polish and wax when you wash your car. Turtle wax will help mess slide off, even after baking in the sun.


4

This is a very nice summary of a straight-forward procedure: Take a clean microfiber polishing cloth, fold it four ways to create a thick, plush wiping cloth. Next, spray one side with your favorite spray detailer, the idea is to hyper-lubricate the entire face of one side. Next place it onto the dried bird dropping. Wet the cloth with ...


4

Paint does more than look nice; it also protects the underlying metal (or other material) from the elements. If there is still some paint under the peeled-away layers, then the matter is only cosmetic for now. If and when the primer is exposed — or worse, bare metal — then the car will begin to rust.


4

Try to remove as much rust as possible with either a die grinder or other rotary device with a wire wheel. Then just use some rust paint to spray over them. You don't even have to take them off the car if you don't want to. Honestly you could even skip the wire wheel if you are feeling really lazy but you may have to respray them every 6 months depending on ...


4

This looks like a badly oxidized clearcoat. The state the paint looks to be in pretty much means that the only cure is a respray. To make matters a bit more interesting, the paint looks like a silver metallic which is much harder to match than a plain colour and will require additional blending in into the surrounding areas like front wings. If you have ...


4

tl;dr: It depends on the ding. Try some cleaner wax, though: it won't make the problem worse. Did you scratch down to the primer or just leave some paint behind? If all you did was trade some paint between cars, you're going to need to polish it off. That said, if you're not comfortable with power polishing tools or abrasive polishes, I would counsel a ...


3

The type of filter you need will depend on the type of paint you will be using. Consult the paint manufacturers web site. Look at the MSDS (material safety data sheet). A section of the form contains what is required for PPE (personal protective equipment). You then need to consult the 3M website to match a filter for the paint and the mask that you will be ...


3

You're off to a good start - research, research, research. 1.) I would add being able to lift car off the ground, and having movable platforms, as to keep your work at a comfortable level as much as possible. The more light you can get on the job, the better - however, it would be safer to have the fixtures outside the plastic/paint area. Just like all of ...


3

I would suggest you try something like Turtle Wax Bug & Tar Remover. Not knowing exactly what the substance is on your finish, I'd start light and go stronger from there. The Bug & Tar stuff will do it's thing without damaging your paint finish. As you get more involved in what you are trying to do to remove the substance, the greater risk you'll ...


2

A wire brush is the best option for removing surface rust, but I wouldn't try the brush you have in any of the tools you've got! In terms of painting, you can just use normal primer, but I would go for a rust inhibiting one (e.g. those sold by Bilt Hamber, Hammerite and others) - If it has started rusting there, there is a reason for it (usually ...


2

If you have a well ventilated area and you have a little time on your hands (a day total with waiting for paint to dry). Then you should just do it right so you're not upset with how they wheels look in a week. Pick yourself up some of my favorite product for stripping painted / rusted parts back down to bare metal. Aircraft Paint Removal (APR) This ...


2

If your lazy, get black rustolium and just spray over everything. Then follow up with a black gloss wheel paint. It will look perfectly fine. EDIT: Try Plastidip! Just get a can and remove the wheel, spray a few good coats, let it dry. There are many, many tutorials on YouTube.


2

Try these sites, I have done research on several sites and these two kept coming up and they also have video on youtube to show you how to do it. http://superiorrestoration.com/categories/graphics http://www.classicdyeproducts.com/custom_button_graphics They help me repair my 05 Escalade buttons for my Steering Wheel, A/C Control Unit, and Navigation/Radio ...


2

Yes, you can sand back to the primer everywhere, but I wouldn't make that the goal. The goal is to provide a smooth (but not too smooth!), level surface that the new paint can adhere to (and of course that adheres to the metal). In some places, that might require sanding back to the existing primer, or even bare metal if you need to do body work. Be ...


2

If you have the undercoat layer intact you should be fine, as it should prevent rust - but be very careful when you take it this far back. My recommendation would be to strip it back and then re-coat the primer/undercoat. That way you are protecting against areas where the moisture can get to bare metal. If you are in the UK you may have problems doing this ...


2

I have tried it many years ago on an Imron paint job. The finish felt smoother than before and the sliding rag test was better. I didn't see any visual difference. In after thought I wondered about the grit that the clay is picking up. Since you reuse the clay wouldn't the clay hold the grit and eventually act as an abrasive? It appeared to do no harm but I ...


2

This is the answer for part (1) : http://www.ehow.com/how_7809103_repair-peeling-clear-coat.html or http://www.ehow.com/how_5028554_fix-peeling-clear-coat-car.html This is the answer for part (2) : http://www.ehow.com/how_2136091_fix-minor-scratch-car.html or http://www.ehow.com/how_5309590_fix-scratches-car.html or ...


2

It might be okay for awhile, but that stuff eventually might start flaking off. I had a Monte Carlo where this stuff started coming off. The paint under it was flat and dull and it looked pretty bad. Here is a thread similar to this question with people that claim that you don't need the coating.


2

Light scratches can be polished and buffed out. I won't detail how to do it here, you can find many tutorials online, but be careful - you CAN burn paint by polishing too hard or staying in one spot too long. Deep scratches can only be repaired by painting. Your local dealership will be able to sell you a paint bottle that matches your factory color ...



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