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68

Physical safety Modern cars are amazingly more safe than classic cars. Guys that are into classic cars frequently throw around phrases like "They don't make them like they use to!" or "This is built like a tank with real American Steel!", but when you look at a classic car in an accident, the results are pretty obvious. In 2009 this crash test was done ...


36

Stop trying to crank it and start beginning to disassemble it. Something is seriously wrong with it and forcing it will only break more stuff that might not already be broken. Especially if you have no idea what caused it to seize in the first place. The only thing more annoying than a seized engine is a seized engine with a sheared off bolt in the nose of ...


24

It isn't something restricted to old vehicles; my Lumina has fans like this, though not as irregular as the picture shown in the question. As far as I can recall, the chief reason cited for this by the manufacturer is noise reduction. You'll notice the additional weight on some of the blades to ensure that rotational balance is maintained despite the ...


24

No, they are not safe Safety standards dating back to before now were not as stringent as they are now. The further in time you go back the less safe they become. Safety has been driven by governments and as regulations have become more stringent over time car manufacturers have had the responsibility to conform to the compliance stack of the time. ...


20

You've already seen the safety comparisons. With that being said, classic cars are for fun. If you're looking for safety, a classic car isn't for you. If you're looking to have fun, go for it. Like most things in life, there's a balance that you have to evaluate. No one can answer that for you. You have to do it for yourself. Are you willing to take ...


16

You're asking two different questions - are they safe, and are they as safe as a modern car. For the second question - No. An older car without all the modern safety features will not protect you, your passengers, or pedestrians as well as a modern car will in the event of a crash - You don't have airbags, crumple zones, ABS, NCAP ratings and so on. For ...


15

Given the assertion that most car accidents occur at speeds of 12MPH or less, most classic cars should be considered safe. Your odds of surviving a crash at parking-lot speeds are very good. However, your chances of walking away with only some bruises are much lower than with a modern car. In even a walking-speed collision, a classic car is going to transfer ...


14

Classic cars are significantly less safe than modern cars. In a classic car, it is both harder to avoid a crash and more likely that you will sustain serious or fatal injuries in the event of a crash. It's the former point I'd like to emphasize in this answer. First, a classic car will not have features like ABS, traction control, or stability control. This ...


13

In the event of an accident, how does a classic vehicle compare to a modern machine? Badly. Are safety features on new vehicles really a life saver? Yes. Can anything be done to improve the safety of classic vehicles? There are certainly safety improvements that can be made. You can fit better brakes and tyres. You can sometimes retrofit ...


10

If Sea Foam and transmission fluid did not work, I would stop trying to crank the engine. If you force the engine you will likely damage it. If I had to guess, there is rust built up on the cylinder wall around the rings. Forcing the pistons past these rust rings will likely score the cylinder wall or ruin the rings. My suggestion is not to risk it; tear ...


10

As others have said, your asking different questions so I will address them separately. Classic cars are safe to drive Classic cars are simply older cars. They were driven successful by people of the time who didn't die in them and nothing has fundamentally altered the safety of the car since that time. If you drive a classic in the same way as you drive a ...


9

Safety in crashes (protecting you): Improvements are visible on a decadal scale and the tend to aggregate over time. (this is somewhat backed up by the plot with the dips discussed above) 2016: Cars commonly come with lane centering, adaptive cruise control, devices to keep the driver awake, and automatic stop features. 2010: Pretty much every car comes ...


8

I think the canonical answer to this question is probably a Honda Civic, anything up to late 90s. My reasons for this recommendation are: The parts are widely available and cheap. There's an abundance of online information about doing repairs and maintenance. The engine is 4-cylinder inline and everything on the engine that needs regular service is easily ...


7

Do not use any product like SeaFoam. I have heard of it doing more harm than good on older cars. It breaks apart the dirt that is holding the seals together! If you are leaking oil, try using a thicker oil or adding something to it, there are many add-ins that work in different situations Take care of it, and don't drive it unnecessarily hard. That ...


7

I'm not positive, but it looks like a vent actuator. In most older vehicles there were manual vents down in the foot well area of the passenger cabin. You'd have to reach down to actuate it by pulling/pushing a knob. Since Buick's were a little more on the "high end" of the car food chain, they would have such controls at easier access to the driver (...


7

This question and answer from @BobCross is very illuminating and may help you in your decision making process. Have a look.


6

I suspect you have a leaking head gasket, you don't have to see the coolant leak because it can leak into the combustion chamber and exit your vehicle in the form of vapor from the tail pipe. It can also leak into the oil so make sure to check the oil for contamination. It could also be as simple as a bad radiator cap, you can test them with specialized ...


6

No car is safe! It can (and does) hurt and kill much more than anything most of us do frequently. Best safety equipment is the operator of the vehicle....NOTHING can replace an alert, smart, and knowledgeable driver! Anyone with knowledge of their vehicle and its limitations can be a safe and courteous fellow driver. With that stated, the advancements in ...


5

To determine if the tires are valuable in your area (depending on location the value can vary wildly) call a couple places that buy back used tires and see what the average payment is for them. In my area used tires cost to buy a used tire is from $25 (USD) and up per tire. If the car is going to the recyclers why would it matter if the car had any ...


5

Can anything be done to improve the safety of classic vehicles? You can attach & use safety equipment like a racing seat & harness, helmet, even a roll cage: This article about Racing Safety Equipment has lots of info, including a warning about roll cages and helmets (especially when putting steel bars near your head): An accident ...


4

Yes there is a way of taking them off though it's not an easy job. First wind the backrest of the seat forwards and push the whole seat forwards on the rails. At the bottom of the fabric you'll see a plastic strip which with a bit of force (flat bladed screwdriver) will first slide from side to side but it should come apart. lying on the back seat wriggle ...


4

Try to get something that is rear wheel drive, a forward facing engine and transmission is simpler and easier to work on then a trans-axle plus it gives you more room to work. Look for something you see a lot of so that the parts and knowledge is easy to acquire, but also get something that you actually want to drive. Older two door pickups work rather well.


4

Firstly, I'm going to asume the bodyshell is sound, as there is no point doing anything if it is rotten (and Volvos of that age can rot very badly) - You'd end up spending hundreds on getting it welded back together... I'll give an idea of prices in Sterling, obviously costs vary depending on where you are... Suspension Creaks and groans are often a ...


4

It has been my experience that a battery has what I call a "rebound". After a large draw is put on it, such as the lights for a period of time, it loses some of it's peak power. Then when the draw is taken off and left to sit, it rebounds and regains some of its energy. This may have given you enough juice to get your car started. I don't have a scientific ...


4

In most cases, using an impact gun will be less likely to cause the fastener to fail. Here is my reasoning: Impact guns provide high torque for very short periods of time. This jarring action or "impact" is going to be more likely to free the fastener. A breaker bar has a continuous torque applied to it. This will be less likely to break it free and will be ...


4

Tl;dr: it might be better for noise, vibration and harshness than for handling. Once upon a time, I had a Fox body mustang. I remembered it being chock full of rattles and squeaks. It was definitely a source of sideways looks from the WifeUnit back in the we have no money days. After doing a little research, it appears that the greatest measurable ...


4

in response to the original question: "are modern cars safer then classic cars" (firefighter here) simple answer: Yes. A lot. why? The structure is much more stable and deforms pretty much less in an accident (for example, cutting the struts of an old car takes 2-3 secs, a modern BMW about 15 secs). Airbags. A lot more, also on the side etc. Belt-...


4

I have been involved in several aspects of the old car world since the early 70's. This subject has come up more and more in the last maybe, ten years and I have spent alot of time pondering it and my involvement in historic racing has given me additional perspective on the subject I think. The basic answer is no, older cars are not safe as newer stuff for a ...


3

Looks like a Rover P5, see the Rover P5 Wikipedia article for further pictures.


3

Another use case for similar structure: Could be used to increase intercooler air circulation with turbocharged vehicles: Intercooling is a method used to compensate for heating caused by supercharging source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intercooler In this case it does not have anything to do with engine air intake (other than cooling down ...



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