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As far as the numbers, use what your vehicle manufacturer recommends. There is a reason your manufacturer recommends a viscosity, the main reason is, the engine is built a certain way and needs that viscosity. If you put a heavier weight oil in the engine than what is called for, your engine will not get the oil in a quantity it needs, nor in places it needs ...


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Your problem is probably with the oil cooler. The LT1 can have an oil cooler which pushes coolant through a housing at the oil filter. It cools the oil as it enters and exits the oil filter. Here is a diagram of the system: You'd be looking at #4 where the heat exchange occurs. If this housing were to crack or have an issue, you'd be pumping oil into the ...


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My 91 Toyota has 170k, and doesn't burn any oil, between changes. Yet. I use m1 . Stay away from the corner lubes, they use Pennzoil, its garbage.


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The 93 Ford 3.8 engine utilizes Torque-to-Yield head bolts. If you didn't replace the head bolts and torque/turn them correctly, you've most likely caused the same problem over you were trying to fix. Plus, if you don't do the sequence properly, you'll have issues again. Here is the installation process for the heads: Clean the cylinder head bolt hole ...


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Part of the reason is that you don't want the oil pan plug to be the first part in the system that hits a bump, tall rock or road debris. Oil pans are pretty durable: if they hit a bump, they'll likely dent. A bolt can be easily knocked askew, off thread or ripped completely out of its hole. I've seen that last one happen right in front of me: tragic. ...


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EDIT based on comments: It's a little hard to tell exactly how much oil we're talking about. The dipstick isn't necessarily a linear measurement: being halfway down the stick doesn't necessarily mean that you have exactly 1/2 your normal allotment of oil. Reminder: as always, this is your car and you have to make the call. Given that and based on the ...



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