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10

In a word: No. To add more to it: Absolutely Not. There is one huge thing which you have not taken into account. That being carbon which deposits from the air/fuel mixture burning process. Where does it go? Right into the oil (among other places). A small amount of blow by occurs which also forces this mixture down into the crank case. Now you have it in ...


8

If you want to know what to use for your car, follow what your vehicle manufacturer has stated. If you would like to better understand what all the gobble-de-gook means, continue reading --- Oil Originally there was crude oil. Black gold. Texas Tea. As crude oil, it is fairly much useless. It's the distillates which make up the usable parts. Crude oil is ...


6

Personally I'm not seeing an issue with replacing the washer. This is a $.05 part. For my '08 Hyundai Azera, it comes with the filter I get from my Hyundai dealer. Does it really need replaced? Probably not, but the one time when it does need changed and you don't do it may be the difference between a $.05 part and a $2500 overhaul/engine replacement. To me ...


5

If you are suggesting there was oil inside the head where the valves/cam(s) are located, this would be perfectly normal. If you are saying the oil puddles are outside of the valve/cam area, this isn't normal, but should be taken care of by you putting a new valve cover gasket on the engine. I would say, clean up the entire work area, complete the replacement ...


4

To answer your questions, if there is a real leak, then yes, there is a problem. The oil will cause the belt to deteriorate and possibly slip. When it does, it is catastrophic. Pistons slam against valves and the head is toast (in most cases). This does happen suddenly. Get a different shop to look at it. If the belt appears dry, I would bet there isn't an ...


4

To add a little bit to Paulster2's answer the upper and lower Explosive Limits of Gasoline is 7.6% and 1.4% respectively. This means that a concentration outside of those limits will either be to rich or lean to burn. And since Gasoline's Flash point is -45 °F (-43 °C) it's pretty much always putting off vapors, which would push any air out of the tank. It's ...


4

It sounds very much like you've blown a head gasket. Even with a new vehicle such as yours, this is not unheard of. There are only two ways you'll get white smoke that I'm aware of, those being a blown head gasket or it sucking up automatic transmission fluid. A head gasket is much more common. I'm sure this thing is still under warranty, so get it down to ...


4

It is very definitely vehicle specific. Every manufacturer is going to or can do it differently, and they do. Think of how many liters your Subie holds for a fresh oil change and for that in a semi-truck. We are talking the difference of quarts to gallons in total. To answer your question, this is basically a trial and error way to do business. You put an ...


4

It may not be apparent right away but may cause issues later on. The Limited Slip Differential contains clutches. They require oil with an additive that allows the clutches to operate correctly. Check the container that the oil came in, it should say Limited Slip/ Posi-trac compatible. It may be in small print on the back of the bottle. If it doesn't, you ...


4

You said "valve gaskets" but I'm going to assume you actually mean the valve seals. Since you are seeing a small puff of smoke sometimes during startup and when you are accelerating, these are usually caused by two separate issues, both of which you are mentioning. Start-up puff of smoke can usually be attributed to bad valve seals. This is because oil ...


3

I pulled this from the talk side of Wikipedia page on electric fuel pumps, which I think explains it pretty well: I am an auto mechanic who also has a chemistry background. The reason electric, tank- mounted fuel pumps do not cause explosions is that the concentration of fuel vapors is too high to allow an explosive mixture. The volatile (which in this ...


3

COULD be worn rings, COULD be bad valve stem seals, COULD be blown head gasket. They all require removing the head, which is easier to do if the engine's sitting on the shop floor. Rings require that the engine be pulled all the way apart. Did your mechanic run a compression test? That'll tell more about this problem than anything else will. Worn ...


3

You need to drain the oil (let it drain as completely as possible) and put new oil inane run the engine. If you see it come back as a "chocolate milk" looking mixture, you need to change the oil again. This may take several tries (two or three) to get it all out. You need to change the filter with each attempt as well. The reason this is important is because ...


3

Obviously you have an oil leak. Where it's at you won't know until you (or your trusted mechanic) tears into it to figure it out. You could test your oil cooler theory by bypassing the cooler (I'm assuming your cooler is inside of the radiator?). Your problem, like you said, could be the cooler, a head gasket leak, or a crack somewhere ... I would put them ...


3

I use it, blended with diesel and kerosene, for undercoating. I'm rural, though - you probably couldn't do that in a city. You can also superfilter it (toilet-paper filter), then heat it above 100*C (to boil off any contained water), and reuse it as motor oil in less-than-critical engines (lawn mowers, etc) or as two-stroke oil for chainsaws. After ...


3

Your logic is way off. You should change your oil and filter at the manufacturers recommended intervals, with an oil of the manufacturers specification. The manufacturers cover many many miles under many differant conditions to decide a specification and in most circumstances the specification cannot be bettered for the intended use of the vehicle.


3

Towards the diagnosis end of things, there are some general guidelines to follow: If you are seeing smoke coming from your exhaust, what color is the smoke? If it's blue, then it's oil If it's black, it means you are running rich (too much fuel). If it's white, the car may be burning antifreeze or (quite rare) auto-trans fluid. Since it's blue smoke ...


3

It is actually normal for brand new and modern cars to consume oil. There is no set number, but as a rule of thumb, it's often agreed that up to about 1 quart or 1 litre of oil per 1000 miles (e.g. out of 6L of oil from the oil pan) is considered to be an entirely normal oil consumption rate; on the other hand, more than 1L per 1000 km is probably too much ...


3

Bottom line is, if your vehicle is running good with 5w30, why would you want to change it? If it's the weight which is specified for it to run/behave properly, this is what you should be using. Engines are made with certain clearances to utilize certain oils. When you start messing with this, you are introducing a possible problem for your engine. Besides, ...


3

I'm taking it the oil level is where the Blue/Red arrow is at? If so, it should be down between the two green lines. If it is this high, I'd have some drained out. I'm not sure how much this would equate to, but would suggest it's in the arena of around 1/2 quart or liter. While many would think it's not a bad thing to have a little too much oil, it can ...


3

The culprit is usually shot piston rings. They act as a buffer between the combustion chamber and the bottom half of the engine. If they go, oil can seep into the combustion chamber and get burned up along with the fuel. To fix this, they'd have to take the entire engine apart to get at the bottom of the pistons. It's not a cheap procedure. Or maybe you're ...


3

As far as the numbers, use what your vehicle manufacturer recommends. There is a reason your manufacturer recommends a viscosity, the main reason is, the engine is built a certain way and needs that viscosity. If you put a heavier weight oil in the engine than what is called for, your engine will not get the oil in a quantity it needs, nor in places it needs ...


2

80W90 is a multiviscosity version of the single-viscosity 90 gear oil; it's the same concept as 10W30 motor oil being the multiviscosity version of single-viscosity 30-weight motor oil. The "W" is a "winter" rating, meaning that the oil in question is designed to be usable in winter months in cold climates. 80W90 oil is perfectly satisfactory for your ...


2

Replacing the washer depends on what the washer material is made out of. Most OEM parts are rubber based, so are both cheap and designed to be one use only. There are also crush washers, which need to be replaced after every use. There are a number of aftermarket (usually magnetic) sump plugs and washers - a large number of these have hard, flat, washers ...


2

Servicing cars almost every day I would recommend replacing at least the sump plug washer every time you change the oil. I actually replace the sump plug as well where possible so the next person has a fresh head on the bolt to take off. Certain sump plugs have allen key heads which can become problematic over time. The local company I get my parts ...


2

If you want to use an o-ring, what you are looking for is an O-ring splicing kit. The kit allows you to form whatever size "O" you need. This kit from Permatex has different sizes (same as most of the kits out there) of cord so you can fill the gap as needed. You'd just need to provide a way to keep the o-ring in place. I would suggest running some kind of ...


2

Think I might be stupid. Should have checked around more. Checked around online, as I had before, but this time found a yahoo answer I had not seen before. "'98-'03 ML320 which would make it a gasoline engine and it uses 8 L or 8.5 quarts. ". Looks like I far underestimated how much oil this beast uses. Guess I'll oil it up some more and hope for the best.


2

To answer your question you put back in the same amount that came out when you evacuated the system. If none came out I usually add 1 to 2 oz depending on the size of the system. To address another part of your question why would you dispose of the old refrigerant? Most recovery machines also recycle the old refrigerant, by that I mean that they remove any ...


2

Actually, the C-3 you are talking about is an ACEA rating. The two major rating agencies for oils are the American Petrolium Institute (API) and The European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA). As was said on this website, these two bodies are trying to bring order to chaos in the world of oil. You are correct that the SN is the most current oil you ...


2

There should never be oil on the plug, neither on the "inside part" nor the "outside part". If oil is on the "inside part" of the plug, then the problem is likely a head gasket, valve stem seals, or worn rings. If oil is on the "outside part" then the problem is likely the valve cover gasket, which you mention that you have replaced. Oil under the valve ...



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