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10

In a word: No. To add more to it: Absolutely Not. There is one huge thing which you have not taken into account. That being carbon which deposits from the air/fuel mixture burning process. Where does it go? Right into the oil (among other places). A small amount of blow by occurs which also forces this mixture down into the crank case. Now you have it in ...


8

If you want to know what to use for your car, follow what your vehicle manufacturer has stated. If you would like to better understand what all the gobble-de-gook means, continue reading --- Oil Originally there was crude oil. Black gold. Texas Tea. As crude oil, it is fairly much useless. It's the distillates which make up the usable parts. Crude oil is ...


8

The below are very easy checks you can do while buying a used car.(from anywhere for that matter of fact) Engine This is the most complicated/expensive part to maintain/replace. Head Gasket check: Open the oil filler cap or the dip stick for any milky white substance , like mayoneese ,if it is present then stay away , it means the head gasket is ...


7

As @dodgethesteamroller stated, there is nothing wrong with reusing the engine oil. There are two caveats and one concern I'd like to mention with this. First, use a clean container to store the oil in while you are doing your engine work. Your normal engine drain pan will probably not give you the cleanliness you are looking for. You DO NOT want to have ...


7

Tyre depth gauges look something like this (amazon link) - you can buy them in any automotive store. You press the green bit against the tyre and push the middle bit into the tread groove. The slidy bit at the top will then tell you the depth. Buy one and have a play, it's easier to see than to explain! You should be able to see the 'wear bars' - raised ...


6

Towards the diagnosis end of things, there are some general guidelines to follow: If you are seeing smoke coming from your exhaust, what color is the smoke? If it's blue, then it's oil If it's black, it means you are running rich (too much fuel). If it's white, the car may be burning antifreeze or (quite rare) auto-trans fluid. Since it's blue smoke ...


6

Nothing wrong with doing this at all. Just make sure that you keep the oil clean and put back in as much as you take out! Usually you don't think about keeping oil clean as it drains since you're going to dispose of it anyway, so take precautions: use only new or thoroughly cleaned funnels and drain pans, wear clean rubber gloves as you unscrew the drain ...


6

It's not a good idea to run the engine dry like that because the bearings on the crankshaft need oil pressure for lubrication. Having said that, some engines can run without oil for a short amount of time thanks to whatever residual oil is trapped between the bearing surfaces. I don't think you would spin a bearing with a limited amount of cranking, but you ...


5

It may not be apparent right away but may cause issues later on. The Limited Slip Differential contains clutches. They require oil with an additive that allows the clutches to operate correctly. Check the container that the oil came in, it should say Limited Slip/ Posi-trac compatible. It may be in small print on the back of the bottle. If it doesn't, you ...


5

I have also prefilled my oil filters when I can. There is a notable difference in the amount of time it takes for the gauge to register when comparing prefilled to not prefilled. The difference is still fairly small though, I guess about 2-3 seconds. Although it seems like a life time while you watch the gauge. I believe this is insignificant though. If you ...


4

An engine that burns oil not only wastes oil but can damage spark plugs, cause the ignition to misfire and eventually affect the catalytic converter. The burning oil can also cause higher emissions, resulting in failed emissions tests due to excess hydrocarbon production REASONS FOR ENGINE OIL BURNS 1.Worn Valve Guides Over time, the valves wear down the ...


4

It sounds very much like you've blown a head gasket. Even with a new vehicle such as yours, this is not unheard of. There are only two ways you'll get white smoke that I'm aware of, those being a blown head gasket or it sucking up automatic transmission fluid. A head gasket is much more common. I'm sure this thing is still under warranty, so get it down to ...


4

It is very definitely vehicle specific. Every manufacturer is going to or can do it differently, and they do. Think of how many liters your Subie holds for a fresh oil change and for that in a semi-truck. We are talking the difference of quarts to gallons in total. To answer your question, this is basically a trial and error way to do business. You put an ...


4

You said "valve gaskets" but I'm going to assume you actually mean the valve seals. Since you are seeing a small puff of smoke sometimes during startup and when you are accelerating, these are usually caused by two separate issues, both of which you are mentioning. Start-up puff of smoke can usually be attributed to bad valve seals. This is because oil ...


4

I'm told that the bulk of the break-in is done in the first few minutes of running and that no synthetic of any kind should be used. You're in "test pilot" land now, all bets are off... If it was me (a person not afraid of blowing up an engine), I'd switch to conventional and do a lot of WOT/decel runs to try to beat in the last of the break-in that I could ...


4

If there was no oil leak before the oil change, then there is a possibility of wrong repair done at the workshop. Generally, for changing oil, the oil pan need not be touched at all, except for the oil drain plug. If the vehicle underbody is checked on a two post lift, then the leaking area could be spotted. Taking the vehicle to another mechanic is a good ...


4

Unfortunately, oil consumption in these engines can be quite large. GM has put out service bulletins which says that engine use up to 1 quart per 2000 miles is perfectly normal. I found some information on the bulletin: (NOTE: - I was unable to find the actual bulletin, but the following is an excerpt from it, which was copied into the forum link I provided ...


4

Judging by your other questions on the site your motorcycle is a '12 Yamaha R6. If so, you have an oil filter, which should pick up the metal flakes and any other debris. A new oil filter and fresh oil should be sufficient to clean out the unwanted debris. It is unlikely that the metal flakes are responsible for a performance degradation if the oil filter ...


4

I wanted to get my comments compiled into a full answer, to make sure we are thorough. Draining oil through the filter connection by running the starting motor to pump the oil brings a few concerns to mind: There is the possibility that fuel will flood the cylinders as you turn the engine over without a spark to burn the fuel. As you said, the ATV started ...


3

The first thing I think of when I hear 'watery oil' is a bad head gasket. That could cause a lot of the issues you are experiencing. we have escaped like noise from the motor Can you explain what that means? I wonder if it could be something simple like an oil change, all fluids or maybe even needs more water. It might be a good idea to change ...


3

Your logic is way off. You should change your oil and filter at the manufacturers recommended intervals, with an oil of the manufacturers specification. The manufacturers cover many many miles under many differant conditions to decide a specification and in most circumstances the specification cannot be bettered for the intended use of the vehicle.


3

It is actually normal for brand new and modern cars to consume oil. There is no set number, but as a rule of thumb, it's often agreed that up to about 1 quart or 1 litre of oil per 1000 miles (e.g. out of 6L of oil from the oil pan) is considered to be an entirely normal oil consumption rate; on the other hand, more than 1L per 1000 km is probably too much ...


3

Bottom line is, if your vehicle is running good with 5w30, why would you want to change it? If it's the weight which is specified for it to run/behave properly, this is what you should be using. Engines are made with certain clearances to utilize certain oils. When you start messing with this, you are introducing a possible problem for your engine. Besides, ...


3

I'm taking it the oil level is where the Blue/Red arrow is at? If so, it should be down between the two green lines. If it is this high, I'd have some drained out. I'm not sure how much this would equate to, but would suggest it's in the arena of around 1/2 quart or liter. While many would think it's not a bad thing to have a little too much oil, it can ...


3

The culprit is usually shot piston rings. They act as a buffer between the combustion chamber and the bottom half of the engine. If they go, oil can seep into the combustion chamber and get burned up along with the fuel. To fix this, they'd have to take the entire engine apart to get at the bottom of the pistons. It's not a cheap procedure. Or maybe you're ...


3

As far as the numbers, use what your vehicle manufacturer recommends. There is a reason your manufacturer recommends a viscosity, the main reason is, the engine is built a certain way and needs that viscosity. If you put a heavier weight oil in the engine than what is called for, your engine will not get the oil in a quantity it needs, nor in places it needs ...


3

Odds are they did a shady job and are now trying to rip you off. No reason why it should be like that unless if they did that by accident or (worse) intentionally. If you can, take a look underneath and see where its leaking from. Likely to be from one of 3 places: 1. The drain plug. Maybe it just needs to be tightened. Or maybe the drain plug has its own ...


3

Not necessarily a presoak, but if you use a product like original Gojo: It will clean the grease/oil really well. You may want to run the stuff through a second time with regular washer detergent to ensure the washer is clean after use. The alternative way would be to take them to a laundromat and use their washer. Only needs to be run through once that ...


2

I agree with Gary's assessment about the Manifold gaskets. The Olds 3800 is a "workhorse" engine as is the 3.3, only you don't see much of the 3.3's on the shelf or in the shop. As this is an older piece of iron it stands to reason that the gaskets may need replacing. If you have a tuned ear you can hear a leak or at least hear the approximate location of ...


2

What I see missing here is the fact that the PCV system does far more than just retain EPA compliance, the blow-by contains dozens of damaging compounds that must be removed as soon as they enter the crankcase by fresh air entering one bank, and the foul nasty vapors evacuated or "sucked" out the opposite bank while still in a gaseous state. If you do NOT ...



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