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6

It's not a good idea to run the engine dry like that because the bearings on the crankshaft need oil pressure for lubrication. Having said that, some engines can run without oil for a short amount of time thanks to whatever residual oil is trapped between the bearing surfaces. I don't think you would spin a bearing with a limited amount of cranking, but you ...


5

I have also prefilled my oil filters when I can. There is a notable difference in the amount of time it takes for the gauge to register when comparing prefilled to not prefilled. The difference is still fairly small though, I guess about 2-3 seconds. Although it seems like a life time while you watch the gauge. I believe this is insignificant though. If you ...


4

I wanted to get my comments compiled into a full answer, to make sure we are thorough. Draining oil through the filter connection by running the starting motor to pump the oil brings a few concerns to mind: There is the possibility that fuel will flood the cylinders as you turn the engine over without a spark to burn the fuel. As you said, the ATV started ...


4

I'm told that the bulk of the break-in is done in the first few minutes of running and that no synthetic of any kind should be used. You're in "test pilot" land now, all bets are off... If it was me (a person not afraid of blowing up an engine), I'd switch to conventional and do a lot of WOT/decel runs to try to beat in the last of the break-in that I could ...


2

I have the same car and I really hate having to check the oil level. The dipstick is on the front/underside of the engine close to the oil filter. It bright yellow, but since it's so well hidden it's easily missed. Here's a photo for clarification:


2

I agree with Gary's assessment about the Manifold gaskets. The Olds 3800 is a "workhorse" engine as is the 3.3, only you don't see much of the 3.3's on the shelf or in the shop. As this is an older piece of iron it stands to reason that the gaskets may need replacing. If you have a tuned ear you can hear a leak or at least hear the approximate location of ...


2

If milk-like oil ends up in the radiator despite replacing the head gasket, it is likely that the head itself has warped due to overheating, allowing oil to leak into the coolant channels. While there is a remote possibility to salvage the cylinder head by having it skimmed by a professional machinist, in all probability it will need to be replaced.


2

Is it likely the extra oil messed up the oxygen sensors? I don't think so; not in a few days' worth of driving if the O2's were healthy to begin with. It is true that if engine oil has been overfilled, more of it will make its way to the exhaust where it will encounter the O2 sensors, causing them to foul, but the abuse would have to be over a longer ...


2

As @Zaid stated in his comment, brake cleaner is volatile and leaves little to no residue behind ... it's how it's designed to work. The only fear I'd have is if the brake cleaner might degrade the siphon tube over time, but then oil itself may have a caustic affect on the tube as well, depending on what it's made out of. In my approximation, if you have no ...


1

A few points worth mentioning when checking oil level: Never rely on the first reading, especially when the engine has just been run Always take out the dipstick and wipe it clean with a rag before reinserting the dipstick to check the level. Never take readings with the engine running The dipstick level markings are supposed to be used with the engine ...


1

Many dip sticks will have lines on one side for cold and the other for hot, and occasionally both will be on the same side. If the different marks are not available, refer to owners' manual for the temperature being indicated. Regardless, check your oil with the engine off. When the engine is running, oil fills galleys, pumps, etc. and is moving around in ...


1

Keep in mind that oil pan gaskets are 20 bucks stuff and they're easy to change at home by yourself.. It'll take you 30 minutes at most.. Jack up the car and do it yourself and save $$$


1

As mentioned in the answers in the linked question, the various additives in the oil break down over time, so the limit isn't just the number of miles done. Quite often your service interval will be listed as "X miles or Y time, whichever is the soonest" for this exact reason. In your case, I think I'd do it once a year, but that's just my opinion without ...


1

Not that it helps you now, but... I'm assuming you did this because the oil was over-full. An easier way to fix this in the future is to remove the oil filler cap and place the hose of a running vacuum cleaner or shop vac over it. This creates lower pressure in the crankcase, allowing you to remove the drain plug and have little/no oil come out. Then remove ...


1

This oil leak is common to the Taurus/Sable, Fusion/Milan, Jaguar S, Lincoln LS, and Mazda 6 models with the 3.0 Duratec V6 along with the Escape/MPV. As a mechanic I can't see doing what is involved to remove the timing chain cover on these vehicles as it would cost a good portion of what many of these now older cars that have the leak are worth. They ...



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