Hot answers tagged

34

Engine oil does much more for an engine than lubricate. It provides cooling, cleaning, and a bunch of other chores. You already know engine function is degraded when you run out of oil. Let's see if we can run it down to make more sense for you how it happens. Let's say, for lack of argument, your engine is running with very little to no oil. The engine ...


22

I would be more concerned about whether engine oil is actually finding its way into the radiator from the engine. If it is, this would be indicative of a compromised head gasket, warped cylinder head, or damaged oil cooler (if the car uses radiator coolant for cooling the oil). The first two items are not trivial to replace or fix. The third one isn't far ...


21

The seller should not be selling the vehicle with oil in the cooling system. That supposed "quick fix" should have been rectified at the earliest opportunity. Have him flush the cooling system and put another few tens of kilometers on the odometer before you even consider such a vehicle. If the seller is topping off the radiator with oil instead of water, ...


13

You Asked What are the benefits of a dry sump? Simply put a wet sump crankcase has oil sitting in the bottom of the crankcase. It's affected by various forces as the car or motorcycle is driven. At times it is possible, during hard braking or cornering, that the oil pickup is not in oil, resulting in a low or no oil pressure condition that could ...


10

tl dr - Have no fear of Vaseline and o-rings O-rings are made out of many different materials. I would suggest that those o-rings which are made to work in the automotive realm are made to be resistant to things such as oil, gasoline, and other petroleum products. This would include Vaseline. While Vaseline and other petroleum products may degrade real ...


10

In most engines, when you fill the oil, it drains into a reservoir on the bottom of the engine known as the oil pan. The tube for the dipstick goes right down into this reservoir to measure the level of the oil. The other important item located in this reservoir is the pick-up tube for the oil pump. As long as the pick-up tube for the pump stays under the ...


10

Yes, it's possible some of the seals designed to withstand water and glycol could get damaged I am thinking you are creating a fictitious scenario here, so I'll roll with it. If you filled your radiator with oil and started your car and let it run for awhile I would be most concerned with damage to seals that were designed to withstand water and glycol. ...


9

Depending on the car model and the technology used, not all fluids I mention here do exist. Here is list of all that I know of: fuel (some cars use two typed of fuel, e.g., petrol and gas, so they have two fuel tanks) engine oil two-stroke oil (in some systems the oil is separated and only combined in the injection) gear oil Automatic Transmission fluid ...


9

An addition to the previous answers: A limiting factor in car construction is the engine height. Using a dry sump setup the engine gets smaller in height and can be located lower. This lowers the car's center of gravity resulting in a better track performance.


9

In very cold climates there are electric heaters that replace the dip stick. They are plugged into an AC outlet and because they reach the oil pan they can apply heat directly to the oil. That way the oil doesn't get cold to the point where it totally looses it's ability to keep your engine protected at start up. It's plugging in that electric heater that ...


8

Dry sump oiling systems are primarily used in racing situations. The main purpose is it will provide oil pressure under any type of hi-G maneuvers, to include cornering, braking, and acceleration. A dry sump oiling system is made up of several parts. The reason why it is called a "dry sump" is because the sump, where in a normal engine is the reservoir for ...


7

No. As far as I can tell, there is no reason that Vaseline might gradually degrade the rubber O-ring on which it has been applied. O-rings that are manufactured for automotive purposes do tend to be made in a rather durable fashion so as to be able to withstand whatever sort of fluids that might accidentally get spilt during car maintenance. If you are ...


5

Disclaimer: I work with an older 202 straight 6 Holden engine in a landrover, so my perspective is somewhat vintage. However the basic underlying concepts are the same. Cause: Low oil in the oil pan, at the very bottom of the engine. Normally the oil should read right on the Full line on a dipstick, when the vehicle is level and the motor is cold and has ...


5

With way too much engine oil in the engine, the problem is that the crankshaft can hit the oil in the bottom of the crankcase when the engine is running. Since the crankshaft is spinning fast, even at idle, each time it slaps the surface of the oil, it will create some bubbles in the oil as the air just behind the spinning crankshaft lobe gets dragged under ...


5

There are quite a lot of different fluids inside a modern car. I tried to group them by purpose. Hydraulic Fluids General use: Hydraulic fluids are used to transfer power from one point to another Brake Fluid - Based on glycole-ether, mineral oil or silicone oil. Brake fluids are designed to have high boiling points because the brake system is subject to ...


5

Per Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_sump A dry sump offers many advantages.[1] The most obvious are increased oil capacity afforded by the remote reservoir, and the capability to mount the engine lower in the vehicle because of the lower sump profile—lowering the overall center of gravity. The external reservoir can also be relocated to ...


4

Oil pumps are always mechanical pumps as they are cheaper to produce than electrical pumps and more reliable as they are driven directly by the crankshaft. A running engine needs sufficient lubrication. By using a directly connected mechanical pump only a few possibilities of a pump failure remain. However, some cars are equipped with an additional electric ...


4

Simple And Technical Definition Of Coolant From a technician's standpoint "engine coolant" would be referring to the 50/50 mix of ethylene/polypropylene glycol and water. From an engineers standpoint engine coolant would TECHNICALLY be anything that assists the system in the cooling process. So, in this case you could refer to the fans, oil, and Anti-freeze ...


4

I can answer this because it has happened to me a few times. There are several different possibilities depending on the ambient temperature and how old the engine is. Here are three real scenarios that have happened with my 1996 Volvo 850: (1) When the oil gets low the first thing you might notice is more noise. Oil muffles the engine, so when oil gets low ...


3

The entire lubrication system for the engine fails, leading to scratching of the cylinders and the barrels, after which point they dont run smoothly and degrade much faster. the pistons are made of aluminium and the cylinders have a special tough glassy coating so they screatch very easily and when the engine is too hot the aluminium deforms and heats in a ...


3

If an engine is that full, it will pump oil through the PCV system into the intake manifold. Piston rings, even in a fresh engine, always have at least a minimal amount of blow-by from combustion. Normally these combustion products pressurize the crankcase slightly and then vent through the PCV (Positive Crankcase Ventilation) system into the intake. ...


3

You asked What actually happens inside the engine to cause it to function incorrectly at higher temperatures? Response One of the many ways that engines fail due to high temperature is the increased diameter of a piston due to the heat. As you have noted heat will make things get bigger. In a situation where an engine seizes due to heat the OD ...


3

Strange - engine coolant is antifreeze diluted with water. So the seller is claiming he had oil but not water? I would not buy that car. For the seller, a coolant system flush would in order, both forwards and reverse, and then refill with antifreeze and clean water. If engine oil still appears in the coolant water then the oil is moving from the oil ...


2

Another issue is that also as the temperature increases, the metal components also slightly increase in size. How much this effects the ability to function I'm not sure, as the increase is still small while the temperature increase is small. My understanding is that the temperature warning doesn't so much warn you that things are too hot, but rather that ...


2

Your piston rings are worn. This is allowing oil into the combustion chamber so it's being burnt off... Typically accompanied by a sweetish smelling exhaust and heavy gas smell in oil itself. And the reason you didn't need to step on the gas when the compression was checked is because the spark plugs shouldn't of been working... This it wouldn't have helped ...


2

The engine will likely seize up. This happened to me with a lawnmower once. I tried to mow the lawn after dad drained the oil, but before he filled it. It ran for a few minutes, then stopped as if the blade had hit something hard, but without the sound of the blade hitting something. We got very lucky, and were able to start it up after adding oil and ...


1

I consider it quite more likely that it was the engine that had been putting oil into the coolant. Of course, it may also be that the seller poured some obvious additional oil on top in order to mask the defective motor seal, a very expensive defect to fix.


1

The real answer is- it depends. An extra couple of quarts? Probably no real effect. If you put in enough that the crank is sloshing the oil around, you probably will get a foam of oil all around the underside of the pistons, but besides robbing a bunch of horsepower due to windage and maybe causing some oil burning issues (at a certain point your oil rings ...


1

It's not good. The little oil you have left will overheat & degrade as others have explained better. With your oil level really low like that, as long as the engine isn't overheating yet, you might be able to get the car to lug itself 5 or 10 miles to a shop to get more oil w/out problems, but it's already really pretty harsh on the car Basically, your ...


1

Without oil to lubricate, metal on metal surfaces begin to heat up from friction. The extra heat causes the metal to expand. When it expands enough, some part of the engine will try to stop moving, but the other parts may not stop yet because of momentum or power, causing bends and breaks of internal engine parts. When oil is too low, the oil pump might ...



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