Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

COULD be worn rings, COULD be bad valve stem seals, COULD be blown head gasket. They all require removing the head, which is easier to do if the engine's sitting on the shop floor. Rings require that the engine be pulled all the way apart. Did your mechanic run a compression test? That'll tell more about this problem than anything else will. Worn ...


3

You need to drain the oil (let it drain as completely as possible) and put new oil inane run the engine. If you see it come back as a "chocolate milk" looking mixture, you need to change the oil again. This may take several tries (two or three) to get it all out. You need to change the filter with each attempt as well. The reason this is important is because ...


3

To answer your questions, if there is a real leak, then yes, there is a problem. The oil will cause the belt to deteriorate and possibly slip. When it does, it is catastrophic. Pistons slam against valves and the head is toast (in most cases). This does happen suddenly. Get a different shop to look at it. If the belt appears dry, I would bet there isn't an ...


2

Actually, the C-3 you are talking about is an ACEA rating. The two major rating agencies for oils are the American Petrolium Institute (API) and The European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA). As was said on this website, these two bodies are trying to bring order to chaos in the world of oil. You are correct that the SN is the most current oil you ...


2

80W90 is a multiviscosity version of the single-viscosity 90 gear oil; it's the same concept as 10W30 motor oil being the multiviscosity version of single-viscosity 30-weight motor oil. The "W" is a "winter" rating, meaning that the oil in question is designed to be usable in winter months in cold climates. 80W90 oil is perfectly satisfactory for your ...


1

A compression test is part and parcel of this sort of complaint. But dont forget the good old cylinder leakage test. This will pin point areas a lone compression test wil not do. There are cases of this sort of high oil consumption, and in a lot of these cases using a cheaper oil of the wrong viscosity and grade leads to the piston rings becoming gummed up ...


1

I can't believe that you're leaking fluid from a spark plug hole. Like Paulster2 above, I'd like to see what happens when that area of the motor is cleaned thoroughly so we can start looking at this thing fresh. On the opposite end of the spark plug is a cylinder full of fire and very high pressure. If anything leaks into that cylinder (say during idle time ...


1

Have you done a compression and leakdown test on that cylinder? If it is oil, and it is coming through the spark plug socket, you've got a couple of problems. 1) Oil is probably getting into the combustion chamber. Remove the plug, check if it has oil on the electrode, or if it's clean. Check the hole for oil on the threads. Perform a compression and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible