Hot answers tagged

42

You haven't wrecked the car but you should get the oil down to the appropriate level. If the oil isn't hot, almost any sort of plastic tubing can be used for siphoning. It's easiest to go in via the dip stick. Remember not to use the "suck start" siphoning method as you don't want a mouthful of oil. If you have a long enough piece of tubing, you can ...


41

Engine oil does much more for an engine than lubricate. It provides cooling, cleaning, and a bunch of other chores. You already know engine function is degraded when you run out of oil. Let's see if we can run it down to make more sense for you how it happens. Let's say, for lack of argument, your engine is running with very little to no oil. The engine ...


33

The oil is most likely being burned by the engine. You should change your oil more often, it's not just new oil you are putting in, when you change your oil, it takes the old oil and contaminates suspended in that oil out. So by added 2 new quarts every so often is not nearly the same as changing the oil. Also I would recommend checking the oil level on a ...


22

I would be more concerned about whether engine oil is actually finding its way into the radiator from the engine. If it is, this would be indicative of a compromised head gasket, warped cylinder head, or damaged oil cooler (if the car uses radiator coolant for cooling the oil). The first two items are not trivial to replace or fix. The third one isn't far ...


21

The seller should not be selling the vehicle with oil in the cooling system. That supposed "quick fix" should have been rectified at the earliest opportunity. Have him flush the cooling system and put another few tens of kilometers on the odometer before you even consider such a vehicle. If the seller is topping off the radiator with oil instead of water, ...


21

If it is burning it's oil, the oil is getting somewhere it shouldn't do - and changing the plugs and coil will make no difference to that! As the oil smoke is coming out of the exhaust, that suggests to me that the oil is getting into the cylinders - the most likely causes for this are a blown headgasket, failed valve stem seals, or failed piston rings. A ...


20

I would not start an engine that has the oil overfilled by a gallon. You can cause permanent engine damage by significantly overfilling the engine with oil. If the crankshaft and connecting rods are contacting the oil, they will whip air into it and cause it to foam. This happens when the oil level is too high. Foamy oil may still work as a barrier ...


19

You Asked What are the benefits of a dry sump? Simply put a wet sump crankcase has oil sitting in the bottom of the crankcase. It's affected by various forces as the car or motorcycle is driven. At times it is possible, during hard braking or cornering, that the oil pickup is not in oil, resulting in a low or no oil pressure condition that could ...


17

Look in your owner's manual for the vehicle. It should have a good recommendation on the grade and whether synthetic oil is required. In fact some vehicle mfg. will recommend a brand because that brand meets certain requirements.


17

If you want to know what to use for your car, follow what your vehicle manufacturer has stated. If you would like to better understand what all the gobble-de-gook means, continue reading --- Oil Originally there was crude oil. Black gold. Texas Tea. As crude oil, it is fairly much useless. It's the distillates which make up the usable parts. Crude oil is ...


16

Many things can (and most certainly will) happen, such as: Engine seizure, pistons stuck in cylinders, broken crankshaft, broken conrods (causing holes in the engine block), damaged camshafts, worn out bearings, etc. So, always use the appropriate oil if you care about your car.


15

Wikipedia has a great page on Synthetic Oils, specifically their performance. Pros: Better high and low temperature performance. They act more like a thinner oil at lower temperatures and like a thicker oil at higher temperatures, without the disadvantages of multiviscosity oils like 10W40. Especially useful when initially starting. Reduced problems ...


15

Towards the diagnosis end of things, there are some general guidelines to follow: If you are seeing smoke coming from your exhaust, what color is the smoke? If it's blue, then it's oil If it's black, it means you are running rich (too much fuel). If it's white, the car may be burning antifreeze or (quite rare) auto-trans fluid. Since it's blue smoke ...


14

Check with your dealer or manufacturer to see if synthetic is usable in your car first of all. For example, RX-7s have traditionally recommended against synthetic because they inject some oil into the combustion chamber and synthetic oils don't work as well for sealing the "apex seals" in this application. Beyond that, there is also a theory that synthetic ...


14

A full synthetic oil, as the name states, is "synthesized". By that, they mean it is made in a lab, it is a manufactured product. Organic (Dino) oil is a product of nature. So the big difference is the environment in which the oil is made in. The main selling point on synthetic over organic is because it is manufactured, it is made in a controlled ...


13

Over filling an engine with oil can cause it too "foam" the oil, which reduces it's lubrication properties. If you lower the level to proper amounts you may have added some wear, but it's unlikely that you caused serious damage.


13

It's a Diesel, which means that you usually have a high detergent oil in an engine that dumps combustion by-products like soot into the oil as part of its normal operation. Given the age of the vehicle I'm not surprised that the oil has noticeably darkened after 10 miles - one of the older Diesels I owned a while back did that during the time it took to run ...


13

In a word: No. To add more to it: Absolutely Not. There is one huge thing which you have not taken into account. That being carbon which deposits from the air/fuel mixture burning process. Where does it go? Right into the oil (among other places). A small amount of blow by occurs which also forces this mixture down into the crank case. Now you have it in ...


13

The below are very easy checks you can do while buying a used car.(from anywhere for that matter of fact) Engine This is the most complicated/expensive part to maintain/replace. Head Gasket check: Open the oil filler cap or the dip stick for any milky white substance , like mayoneese ,if it is present then stay away , it means the head gasket is ...


13

It definitely could have worked it's way (the drain bolt) over the three month period from the previous change. The cause would be an improperly torqued oil drain bolt. It wouldn't be the first time. Getting together evidence that it IS their fault is impossible. So, to clearly answer this question What could cause the oil plug to just come out, if ...


12

Simple answer - no, you can never get rid of ALL of the old oil - and you wouldn't want to, as you need to keep a film of oil over all the moving parts all the time. The small amount of residual oil will mix with the new oil quite happily. Oil flows better when it is warmer (as it gets thinner), so the best way to get as much of the sludge and residue out ...


12

In most engines, when you fill the oil, it drains into a reservoir on the bottom of the engine known as the oil pan. The tube for the dipstick goes right down into this reservoir to measure the level of the oil. The other important item located in this reservoir is the pick-up tube for the oil pump. As long as the pick-up tube for the pump stays under the ...


12

tl dr - Have no fear of Vaseline and o-rings O-rings are made out of many different materials. I would suggest that those o-rings which are made to work in the automotive realm are made to be resistant to things such as oil, gasoline, and other petroleum products. This would include Vaseline. While Vaseline and other petroleum products may degrade real ...


12

Number one answer is always Head Gasket. The reason is that there are oil and water passages in close proximity, being separated by a gasket (which might just be flimsy paper or rubber, but is often steel or copper) sandwiched between two pieces of metal with (usually) different thermal expansion rates. This means that any time your engine gets far enough ...


11

I found a reference pdf for GM's Oil Life Monitor System. How does the system work? The GM Oil Life Monitor System is not a mileage counter. It is actually a computer based software algorithm that determines when to change oil based on engine operating conditions. There is no actual oil condition sensor. Rather, the computer continuously monitors ...


11

The most likely source is the head gasket. There are very few other ways (short of catastrophic engine failure - and that would give other symptoms!) of the two mixing. Check for excessive smoke (oil getting into the bores), coolant loss (coolant getting into the bores) and a mayonnaise effect in the oil (coolant getting into the oil) You don't say what ...


11

An addition to the previous answers: A limiting factor in car construction is the engine height. Using a dry sump setup the engine gets smaller in height and can be located lower. This lowers the car's center of gravity resulting in a better track performance.


11

Unless you recently added oil or had it serviced, I would be concerned. I would wonder what is raising the oil level. Do you have any signs of engine oil mixing with coolant? Does the oil have a tan colored foamy appearance? This could be an indication of coolant leaking into the crankcase.


11

I had exactly the same experience with a chain oil change shop. It's one of the reasons I stopped using any outside mechanic for anything short of things I can't handle due to specialized tools or time required. In my case it was also thousands of miles before the problem showed up. I did have droplets of oil on the driveway, but I can easily imagine ...


10

Normally, I would ask first in a comment but that seems to be a privilege not available to new users, so here goes: Are you sure it was the radiator cap and not the overflow bottle? The radiator is usually full and getting 100ml in would be a struggle, not to mention that the green coolant would be staring you in the face. If you radiator wasn't full then ...



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