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28

The oil is most likely being burned by the engine. You should change your oil more often, it's not just new oil you are putting in, when you change your oil, it takes the old oil and contaminates suspended in that oil out. So by added 2 new quarts every so often is not nearly the same as changing the oil. Also I would recommend checking the oil level on a ...


28

You haven't wrecked the car but you should get the oil down to the appropriate level. If the oil isn't hot, almost any sort of plastic tubing can be used for siphoning. It's easiest to go in via the dip stick. Remember not to use the "suck start" siphoning method as you don't want a mouthful of oil. If you have a long enough piece of tubing, you can ...


16

Look in your owner's manual for the vehicle. It should have a good recommendation on the grade and whether synthetic oil is required. In fact some vehicle mfg. will recommend a brand because that brand meets certain requirements.


12

Check with your dealer or manufacturer to see if synthetic is usable in your car first of all. For example, RX-7s have traditionally recommended against synthetic because they inject some oil into the combustion chamber and synthetic oils don't work as well for sealing the "apex seals" in this application. Beyond that, there is also a theory that synthetic ...


10

Many things can (and most certainly will) happen: Engine seizure, pistons stuck in cilinders, broken crankshaft, broken conrods (causing holes in the engine block), damaged camshafts, worn out bearings, etc. So, always use the appropriate oil if you care about your car.


10

Over filling an engine with oil can cause it too "foam" the oil, which reduces it's lubrication properties. If you lower the level to proper amounts you may have added some wear, but it's unlikely that you caused serious damage.


10

I would not start an engine that has the oil overfilled by a gallon. You can cause permanent engine damage by significantly overfilling the engine with oil. If the crankshaft and connecting rods are contacting the oil, they will whip air into it and cause it to foam. This happens when the oil level is too high. Foamy oil may still work as a barrier ...


9

I found a reference pdf for GM's Oil Life Monitor System. How does the system work? The GM Oil Life Monitor System is not a mileage counter. It is actually a computer based software algorithm that determines when to change oil based on engine operating conditions. There is no actual oil condition sensor. Rather, the computer continuously monitors ...


9

It's a Diesel, which means that you usually have a high detergent oil in an engine that dumps combustion by-products like soot into the oil as part of its normal operation. Given the age of the vehicle I'm not surprised that the oil has noticeably darkened after 10 miles - one of the older Diesels I owned a while back did that during the time it took to run ...


8

Wikipedia has a great page on Synthetic Oils, specifically their performance. Pros: Better high and low temperature performance. They act more like a thinner oil at lower temperatures and like a thicker oil at higher temperatures, without the disadvantages of multiviscosity oils like 10W40. Especially useful when initially starting. Reduced problems ...


8

A full synthetic oil, as the name states, is "synthesized". By that, they mean it is made in a lab, it is a manufactured product. Organic (Dino) oil is a product of nature. So the big difference is the environment in which the oil is made in. The main selling point on synthetic over organic is because it is manufactured, it is made in a controlled ...


8

The SAE grade (in this case 10W-40) only specifies the viscosity of the oil - it doesn't say anything specifically about the composition of the oil or any additives it may have. So for a particular viscosity grade, it might petroleum-based or synthetic (or a mixture of the two), and might have any number of additives that affect various properties of the ...


7

If you're looking to change oil at a set mileage interval you should use the maintenance interval set by the vehicle manufacturer. More frequent changes aren't necessary however you may wish to change oil more frequently based on driving conditions (lot's of stop & go, short drives.)


7

Sounds like your oil pressure is dropping at low RPM, which could be one of the following: low oil level, a bad oil pump, low viscosity oil, or worn bearings. First step after checking the oil level is to check the oil pressure with a manual gauge.


7

I echo jzd's answer. The car's owner's manual should tell you what you need. To answer some more of your question: numbers like "5W30" are viscosity ratings. They indicate how viscous ("thick") the oil is. Most oils are "multi-viscosity," quoting a range of weights (e.g., 5W30 instead of 30W) to indicate how they behave at different temperatures. The "W" ...


7

Oil has a couple of places it can go. The ground The radiator The tail pipe It could be a leak that only happens under pressure (IE the engine running) but for that amount the underside of the car would be covered in oil and should be very obvious by looking under the car with a flashlight. If it's going out the tail pipe you would see obvious blue ...


7

The most likely source is the head gasket. There are very few other ways (short of catastrophic engine failure - and that would give other symptoms!) of the two mixing. Check for excessive smoke (oil getting into the bores), coolant loss (coolant getting into the bores) and a mayonnaise effect in the oil (coolant getting into the oil) You don't say what ...


7

Most likely cause is a worn or misadjusted clutch. The clutch disc is slipping meaning that all the engines power is not being transmitted to the transmission. Cost of a clutch replacement is to varied to give an accurate estimate. Clarification Note Energy will always take the path of least resistance. From a clutch's perspective, it is much more ...


6

A few things can happen: The crankshaft could be bent The seals and gaskets could be destroyed Very high crankcase pressure can lead to oil coming out of the crankcase ventilation (which might destroy your pistons if it enters your cylinders through your intake system) Eric Fossum's remark about turning the oil to foam is a very important one. It leads ...


6

The oil in the crankshaft is in contact with air and gasoline fumes. If you used an oil with an ignition point as low as the engine temperature, it would probably start a fire in there. I'm not sure how vigorous the fire would be (that likely depends on the air supply, which probably varies between engines), but it would eventually deplete the oil, cover ...


6

The oil is going somewhere. If your vehicle is not marking its territory (leaking when parked), it's probably burning it.


6

Besides the weight, be sure that you buy oil with one of the "C" codes in the service symbol. The top half of the ring should say "API Service C-something". Update: The Logo looks like this one:


6

If you are looking to improve your cars performance, then I suggest you try something different. Your gains from using a different viscosity oil will be laughable (if there will be any), especially compared to any proper performance-oriented change. Unless, of course, if what you can do with engine is limited by regulations and you are expending last ...


6

My first suggestion would be to ask whoever did the change. If you are seriously in doubt, provide the oil to somebody to redo the change, or simply do it yourself. If you are able to do the change yourself, I would suggest learning to do so (just keep the receipts so you can provide them as maintenance records in the event you wish you sell the vehicle). ...


6

The worst thing that can happen is that you can destroy your vehicle. Your vehicle is designed to use some very specific lubrication, and using something other than what's specified can be detrimental. If the lubricant cannot withstand high temperatures, you could gunk up your engine and require a rebuild.


6

Normally, I would ask first in a comment but that seems to be a privilege not available to new users, so here goes: Are you sure it was the radiator cap and not the overflow bottle? The radiator is usually full and getting 100ml in would be a struggle, not to mention that the green coolant would be staring you in the face. If you radiator wasn't full then ...


6

The very first thing that you should check is whether you actually made a mistake and, if so, which one. A cap that says "ATF oil only" is for automatic transmission fluid. If you're adding engine oil to the transmission, that's going to make your transmission very unhappy. It is fixable: you'll need to drain the transmission fluid and replace it. If ...


6

You might be interested in this question: What are the audible symptoms of a failing starter motor? The diagnosis in that question and answer period was that I probably had an aging starter motor (correct).


5

I take it the car is front wheel drive, being a 90s Toyota? If it is only leaking when parked facing uphill, then (logically) the leak must be to the rear of the engine. I would suggest that the driveshaft oil seals (where the shafts leave the gearbox) is a likely suspect. Where is the oil filter mounted? The seals around them can often be suspect. ...


5

Your oil pan gasket is probably leaking on one side. when you're on an incline, the oil is pooling on that side of the oil pan and subsequently leaking out.



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