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8

For OCD you can place a flat pan below the oil drain and lower the front wheels to get the remaining oil out, then jack it up again. Though I would not worry about couple of ounces in your place. Even if your car is level old oil will still remain in the engine (other cavities, thin film, etc.). For example in my engine that takes 4L of fresh oil, 2 ounces ...


6

Personally I'm not seeing an issue with replacing the washer. This is a $.05 part. For my '08 Hyundai Azera, it comes with the filter I get from my Hyundai dealer. Does it really need replaced? Probably not, but the one time when it does need changed and you don't do it may be the difference between a $.05 part and a $2500 overhaul/engine replacement. To me ...


4

Assuming you're buying the OEM filter from a Subaru dealer, they should be giving you a new washer with each one. It's an aluminum washer that's sort of folded over on itself so that it crushes. I just did an oil change, so here's a picture of the washers (used on the left, new on the right): Notice that the left one is appreciably flattened. My ...


4

I've been changing my own oil since 1975 or so, Daniel, more often than not, several cars at a time (it's been a long long time since I've only had one vehicle). I've never changed a drain plug gasket - I've never seen one that leaked significantly enough to warrant replacement. Do wipe around the drain hole, and wipe the existing gasket, before putting the ...


3

If there was no oil leak before the oil change, then there is a possibility of wrong repair done at the workshop. Generally, for changing oil, the oil pan need not be touched at all, except for the oil drain plug. If the vehicle underbody is checked on a two post lift, then the leaking area could be spotted. Taking the vehicle to another mechanic is a good ...


3

Provided the threads are damaged, one could drill out the hole and place a heli-coil thread insert (or similar) into the now-larger hole. Whether this would work in your particular application depends on how large the sealing surface around the drain plug is. One company markets a threaded bushing to repair oil pan drain plugs that performs a similar ...


3

Was the factory solution not using a gasket? A gasket is usually better than the Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) sealing method since RTV is really messy and hard to clean off during maintenance and is harder to apply which may lead to failure as you have seen. There should be no need to warranty the gasket. If it becomes an issue again it should still ...


3

UPDATE & ANSWER After some research, I discovered that any future engine work will not be guaranteed when an over sized plug is installed - compared to having the factory supplied plug correctly installed. (Some dealerships won't even service vehicle engines with over sized plugs.) In addition, it is much easier for these threads to fail between oil ...


3

I would be satisfied with the repair. I would push for some free service, maybe a couple of free oil changes. Demand a refund for the service you paid for when the damage was discovered I would also demand a letter accepting blame and a promise to replace the oil pan for free if you find the repair unacceptable at a later date due to stripped threads or ...


2

A web search for universal oil drain plugs yielded several results. There are several types. One type is shaped like a mushroom with a wing nut on the top. Insert the stem in the drain hole and tighten the wing nut which expands the stem and seals the hole. Another type has a toggle bolt that is inserted in the drain and an attached rubber cap that covers ...


2

You can get more oil out of the bottom if you take pan off once it's empty. The difficulty of doing this will vary by car, of course. Just be careful if the oil is hot. And you will probably need a new gasket for when you put it back on.


2

Use a pump to remove the oil, and skip the ramps -- unless needed for the filter. I can not imagine it makes any difference-- some oil is left no matter how well you drain. Use better oil or change more often are other answers. The oil gets dirty immediately anyway so I wouldn't want to do anything that could be unsafe like raising all 4 wheels -- just buy ...


2

Replacing the washer depends on what the washer material is made out of. Most OEM parts are rubber based, so are both cheap and designed to be one use only. There are also crush washers, which need to be replaced after every use. There are a number of aftermarket (usually magnetic) sump plugs and washers - a large number of these have hard, flat, washers ...


2

Servicing cars almost every day I would recommend replacing at least the sump plug washer every time you change the oil. I actually replace the sump plug as well where possible so the next person has a fresh head on the bolt to take off. Certain sump plugs have allen key heads which can become problematic over time. The local company I get my parts ...


2

It very well could be the oil pan gasket, but this could be caused from a leaky anything on the engine. Look for where the highest point of where you see the gunk and start looking from that level. You should also be seeing some amount of gunk on the engine as well. If you really want to find it, do a thorough cleaning of the entire engine bay, then start ...


2

This is a pretty common problem. Buy an oversized drain plug tap kit and retap your drain plug threads with the tap. The kit will also usually come with a replacement drain plug that fits the new larger tapped threads.


2

I agree with @knocksAndMisfires - it sounds strange that the oil pan gasket would have to be touched for a routine oil change. If the oil pan/lower sump was removed then this may necessitate a gasket change since they tend to be a single-use item, but this should not be required for a routine oil change. One other thing worth mentioning: $200 for an oil ...


2

Do you have a workshop manual for the car? The torque figures should be listed in there. In the UK Haynes manuals they are at the beginning of the relevant chapter. I'm not aware of a specific order for oil sump bolts, but if there is one it should be listed in the approprate section of said manual. Normally it is only head bolts that need to be tightened ...


1

Odds are they did a shady job and are now trying to rip you off. No reason why it should be like that unless if they did that by accident or (worse) intentionally. If you can, take a look underneath and see where its leaking from. Likely to be from one of 3 places: 1. The drain plug. Maybe it just needs to be tightened. Or maybe the drain plug has its own ...


1

Both of my cars use flat metal washers (and neither one is something the local shops stock). Recommendation (manual) is to replace every time. I've never replaced either one (1991 and 1995 vehicles). Never a single drop of oil from either. If I did leak a few drops I wouldn't get too excited anyways since on the '95 the turbo oil return line has always ...


1

You don't need to worry about draining every last drop of oil. Just make sure that you change the oil and filter regularly every 50,000 miles as I do. My 4 cars perform as new with an average of 165,000 miles, 2 diesel and 2 gasoline.


1

Oil pans don't have a specific bolt sequence like a cylinder head or crankshaft bolts. This link should be helpful: TDIClub Forums - View Single Post - frequently asked torque specs: Use Silicone sealant D 176 404 A2 Removing Remove center, left and right sound insulation trays: Drain engine oil. Remove securing bolts for oil pan. ...



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